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13 SEPTEMBER 2014

About Two squares: In 6 constructions: A Suprematist Tale (Suprematicheskii Skaz Pro Dva Kvadrata v Shesti Postroikakh)

"This short book, intended for children of all ages, is perhaps the best–known work of El Lissitzky (1890–1941). Lissitzky was a Russian artist, architect, designer, typographer, and photographer who was active in the avante garde movement that flourished in Soviet Russia and in Germany, until the dominance of Soviet Realism by 1930 put a stop to its revolutionary activity. He directly influenced the typographical and display advertising innovations of the Bauhaus and 'de Stijl'. This book entirely integrates modern typographical effects, as Lissitzky intended, with his illustrations in the Suprematist style.

The original book About Two Squares was printed by letterpress, even the slanted text and illustrations. It was first produced ('constructed') in 1920 at the Soviet art institute UNOVIS in Vitebsk, and around April 1922 printed by Sycthian Press, Berlin, by Haberland Printers, Leipzig, in paperback, with 50 hardbound copies autographed and numbered, as the copyright page states."

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TAGS

1922 • About 2 Squares (El Lissitzky) • allegory • art books • artistartists booksavant-garde artists • avant-garde movement • black square • Bolshevism • childrens bookDe Stijldesign formalismEl LissitzkyFuturismgeometric abstractiongeometric formsgeometric primitivegraphic designgraphic design historyibiblioJew • Lazar Markovich Lissitzky • letterpress printinglithographymanifestomodernist aesthetics • modernist utopian vision • non-objective art • offset litho • offset printingpaperback • periodical design • picture bookprintingprintmaking • propagandist works • red circle • red square • Russian constructivism • Russian nationalism • sans-serif typeface • Soviet propaganda • Soviet Russiasquare • story of revolution • Suprematism • suprematism movement • suprematist aesthetics • typographical effects • typography • UNOVIS (Affirmers of the New Art) • utilitarianvisual abstraction

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
30 MARCH 2014

Work begins on the world's first 3D-printed house

"At the centre of the process is the KamerMaker, or Room Builder, a scaled–up version of an open–source home 3D–printer, developed with Dutch firm Ultimaker. It uses the same principle of extruding layers of molten plastic, only enlarged about 10 times, from printing desktop trinkets to chunks of buildings up to 2x2x3.5m high.

For a machine–made material, the samples have an intriguingly hand–made finish. In places, it looks like bunches of black spaghetti. There are lumps and bumps, knots and wiggles, seams where the print head appears to have paused or slipped, spurting out more black goo than expected.

'We're still perfecting the technology,' says Heinsman. The current material is a bio–plastic mix, usually used as an industrial adhesive, containing 75% plant oil and reinforced with microfibres. They have also produced tests with a translucent plastic and a wood fibre mix, like a liquid form of MDF that can later be sawn and sanded. 'We will continue to test over the next three years, as the technology evolves,' she says. 'With a second nozzle, you could print multiple materials simultaneously, with structure and insulation side by side.'"

(Oliver Wainwright, 28 March 2014, The Guardian)

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20143D printing • 3D-printed house • Amsterdamarchitecture • biodegradable materials • black spaghetti • brickbuilding process • canal • canal house • computer-controlled gantry • contour crafting • cyberarchitecturedesign futuresdigital fabricationdigital forming • Dus Architects • dwellingfabrication • gable • honeycomb lattice • honeycomb structurehouse • housebuilding • housing • Janjaap Ruijssenaars • KamerMake • lattice • liquorice • machine-made material • made on-demandmanufacturingMDFmobius stripnew crafts • novelty technology • oozingplant oilplastic • plastic facade • print structures • printingrapid manufacturing • Room Builder • synthetic sandstone • technological developmentsThe Guardian • treacle • Ultimaker • wood fibre

CONTRIBUTOR

Linda Carroli
01 MAY 2012

Graphic Design Communication students recreate an ornamental display font through contemporary and traditional processes

"Stage one Graphic Design Communication students have been developing a new ornamental display font with highly Individual characters inspired by drawing digitally and laser cut manufactured to the exacting standards reminiscent of a traditional font foundry.

Level tutor Nigel Bents and Associate Lecturer Paul Oakley will further support students by printing typographic posters at the New North Press."

(Graphic Design Communication at Chelsea College of Art and Design, 16 October 2011)

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TAGS

Adobe Illustratoralphabetbeing smart with technology • Bodoni • Chelsea College of Art and Design • compositor • contemporary font design • craftcraft nostalgiacraft skillscreative practicedesignerdisplay fontdrawing digitallyearly twentieth centuryfont • font design • graphic design communication • hybrid processindividual character • laser cut • laser cuttingmovable typenew crafts • New North Press • new techniques • Nigel Bents • ornamental • ornamental alphabet • ornamental display font • ornamental font • Paul Oakley • posterprintingprinting processrecreationrendered on the screenskillsstudentstechniquetechnology • traditional font foundry • traditional practicestraditional processtype • type founding • typographertypographic postertypographyUKvisual communicationwoodblock printing

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
02 FEBRUARY 2012

Upside Down, Left To Right: A Letterpress Film

"A short documentary film about letterpress and one of the few remaining movable–type printing workshops in the UK, situated at Plymouth University, featuring Paul Collier."

(Danny Cooke)

Fig.1 A film by Danny Cooke dannycooke.co.uk, soundtrack by Tony Higgins tonyhiggins.org.

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TAGS

Adobe Illustrator • alloy • bookscraftcultural technologyDanny Cookedesign processdevicegraphic designhand-crafted typeinkJohannes Gutenbergletteringletterpresslithographymaterialitymechanical • metal • metal type • movable metal • movable typepagesetting • Paul Collier • Plymouth University • press • printingprinting press • printing workshops • processpublishingshort documentaryshort filmtactile • tactile process • technical process • technologytraditiontraditional processtraditional techniquestypetypographyUK

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
25 OCTOBER 2009

Fernand Mourlot lithographe: Le Taureau de Pablo Picasso

"The printing process took fifteen days. On December 5th 1945, one month after his first visit to the rue Chabrol studio, Picasso made a wash drawing of a bull. A wonderful bull, very well rendered, sweet, even. Then we printed the proofs – only two or three, making this first state of the bull an extremely rare. One week later he returned and asked for a fresh stone; he made another wash drawing and quill drawing; then he started again on the 18th. For the third state he changed technique, scraping down to the stone and drawing over to accentuate the contours; the bull became a terrible creature, with terrifying horns and eyes. Well, that wouldn't do – Picasso took the composition to the fourth state, on December 22, and then a fifth on December 24. Each time he simplified the drawing; it bacame more and more geometric, with zones of flat black...

He then made the sixth and seventh states (December 26th and 28th), and then four more between January 5th and 17th – eleven in all. The taureau was reduced to its essential form, rendered in a few perfectly placed lines which symbolized this poor bull with his pinhead and ridiculous horns like antennae. The workers all regretted seeing such a magnificent bull transformed bit by bit into a sort of insect.

It was Célestin who finally expressed it: 'Picasso ended up where normally he should have started.' It's true; but in order to achieve his pure and linear rendering of the bull, he had to pass through all of the intermediary stages. And when you stand before his eleventh bull, it's hard to imagine the work that went into it"

(Fernand Mourlot, Gravés dans ma mémoire, Ed. Robert Laffont, 1979)

1). Pablo Picasso, Les 11 états successifs de la lithographie Le Taureau , 1945.

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TAGS

19451946abstractionartartistbulldrawing • Fernand Mourlot • formalismlithographyPablo Picassoprintingsketchtaureautorrosvisual communicationvisual depictionvisualisation

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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