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28 OCTOBER 2015

The Free Universal Construction Kit

"Ever wanted to connect your Legos and Tinkertoys together? Now you can — and much more. Announcing the Free Universal Construction Kit: a set of adapters for complete interoperability between 10 popular construction toys.

F.A.T. Lab and Sy-Lab are pleased to present the Free Universal Construction Kit: a matrix of nearly 80 adapter bricks that enable complete interoperability between ten* popular children's construction toys. By allowing any piece to join to any other, the Kit encourages totally new forms of intercourse between otherwise closed systems—enabling radically hybrid constructive play, the creation of previously impossible designs, and ultimately, more creative opportunities for kids. As with other grassroots interoperability remedies, the Free Universal Construction Kit implements proprietary protocols in order to provide a public service unmet—or unmeetable—by corporate interests.

The Free Universal Construction Kit offers adapters between Lego, Duplo, Fischertechnik, Gears! Gears! Gears!, K'Nex, Krinkles (Bristle Blocks), Lincoln Logs, Tinkertoys, Zome, and Zoob. Our adapters can be downloaded from Thingiverse.com and other sharing sites as a set of 3D models in .STL format, suitable for reproduction by personal manufacturing devices like the Makerbot (an inexpensive, open-source 3D printer)."

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20123D printing • adapter brick • adapter bricks • adaptersagency of access and engagementbottom-up innovation • Bristle Blocks • building brick • childhood imagination • connector • construction set • construction system • construction toy • constructions set • disruptive innovationDIY • Duplo • Fischertechnik • freely available • freely downloadable • Gears Gears Gears • Golan Levingrassroots initiativehacktivismhybridityimpurityinteroperabilityinteroperable technologies • KNex • Krinkles • LEGO • Lincoln Logs • Makerbot • mash-upnew hybridityopen systems • personal manufacturing devices • Physibles • proprietary protocols • proprietary technologiesremix culturerethink boundaries • Shawn Sims • STUDIO for Creative Inquiry • Tinkertoys • toy • Universal Construction Kit • Zome • Zoo

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
04 OCTOBER 2015

Connbox: prototyping a physical product for video presence with Google Creative Lab, 2011

"At the beginning of 2011 we started a wide-ranging conversation with Google Creative Lab, discussing near-future experiences of Google and its products. They had already in mind another brief before approaching us, to create a physical product encapsulating Google voice/video chat services. This brief became known as 'Connection Box' or 'Connbox' for short…

There were interaction & product design challenges in making a simpler, self-contained video chat appliance, amplified by the problem of taking the things we take for granted on the desktop or touchscreen: things like the standard UI, windowing, inputs and outputs, that all had to be re-imagined as physical controls.

This is not a simple translation between a software and hardware behaviour, it’s more than just turning software controls into physical switches or levers.

It involves choosing what to discard, what to keep and what to emphasise.

Should the product allow ‘ringing’ or ‘knocking’ to kickstart a conversation, or should it rely on other audio or visual cues? How do we encourage always-on, ambient, background presence with the possibility of spontaneous conversations and ad-hoc, playful exchanges? Existing ‘video calling’ UI is not set up to encourage this, so what is the new model of the interaction?

To do this we explored in abstract some of the product behaviours around communicating through video and audio. "

(Matt Jones, 26 February 2013, Berg Ltd)

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2011 • Apple FaceTime • Berg Ltd • communications interaction interface • computer-mediated interaction • connbox • design prototypedesigning for interaction • development log • Durrell Bishop • experiential proof • form and functionfuture interfacesGolan Levin • Google Creative Lab • Google Hangouts • Google Plus • hardware prototyping • interaction designinteraction styleslive video • Luckybite • material exploration • near-future scenariosOpenFrameworks • physical product • portalproduct design • prototyping brief • research and developmentSkypesoftware prototypingtechnology affordances • teleconference • video calling • video chat • video conferencing • video phone • video presence • video-based communication • videoconferencing

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
17 DECEMBER 2014

An Informal Catalogue of Slit-Scan Video Artworks and Research

"Slitscan imaging techniques are used to create static images of time–based phenomena. In traditional film photography, slit scan images are created by exposing film as it slides past a slit–shaped aperture. In the digital realm, thin slices are extracted from a sequence of video frames, and concatenated into a new image.

Recently I've seen many new–media projects based on slit–scan techniques. They range from student projects, to Java demonstrations on the Processing.org site, to works by recognized pioneers of video and interactive art. My inclination to make lists is irresistible, and so I've put together this catalogue as an aid to researchers and students. My aim is to be as inclusive as possible, rather than attempt to winnow the projects down to just a few ideal exemplars or the most significant historic precursors. Thus not all of the examples are even computational: some of the projects described below use motion–picture film, still photography, or analog video techniques."

(Golan Levin)

Compiled by Golan Levin. Begun: 1 March 2005. Last edit: 17 July 2010.

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Adam Finkelstein • Adam MagyarAlexei Shulgin • Allison Klein • Alvaro Cassinelli • Andrew Davidhazy • Andy Polaine • Angus Leadley Brown • Anna Szepesi • Ansen Seale • Aristarkh Chernyshev • Bill Spinhoven • Bjorn Barnekow • Bradford Bohonus • Brendan Dawes • Bryan Mumford • Camille Utterback • Christian Hossner • Christian Kessler • Christian Rohner • chronophotography • Claude Hidber • computational art • Dan Kaminsky • Daniel CrooksDaniel Rozin • Daniel Sauter • Datadouche • David Tinapple • Derek Burnett • Dietmar Offenhuber • Dirk Lusebrink • divisionism • Don Whitaker • Douglas Trumbull • E.J. Gone • Eddie Elliott • Egbert Mittelstadt • epipolar diagram • Eric Lee • Fabian Thommen • Geert Mul • George Silk • Glen Murphy • Golan Levin • Greg Ercolano • Guy Hoffman • HC Gilje • He-Lin Luo • image stretching • Jacques-Henri Lartigue • James Seo • Jean-Michel Jarre • Ji-Hoon Byun • Joachim Sauter • Joe Baldwin • Juanjo Fernandez Rivero • Jussi Angesleva • Keith Lam • Kenji Mase • Kevin Atkinson • Kurt Ralske • Mark Hauenstein • Martin Hilpoltsteiner • Martin Reinhart • Masatoshi Ishikawa • Masayuki Akamatsui • Mateusz Herczka • mechanical technique • Michael Aschauer • Michael Cohen • Michael Naimark • Michael Terry • Mindfukc • Miska Knapek • Mitchell Whitelaw • Mogens Jacobsen • multiperspective panorama • Neil Jenkins • new media aestheticsNHK • Nicolas Horne • NYX • Osman Khan • Paul de Marinis • Paul Harter • Peter-Pike Sloan • Pipilotti Rist • Processing (software) • R Greenberg Associates • Robert Seidel • rolling shutter • Roman Haefeli • Romy Achituv • Ross Cooper • Roy Tanck • Sascha Pohflepp • scanner photography • scanning digital camera • scannography • scanography • Scott Carver • Scott Owsley • Sid Fels • slit-scan cameraslit-scan photography • slit-scan techniques • slit-shaped aperture • space-time correlation • space-time representation • spacio-temporal imaging • spatiotemporal imaging • Steina Vasulka • Stephan Schulz • streak photography • strip photography • Susanne Jaschko • synchroballistic photography • Tamas Waliczky • Tania Ruiz Gutierrez • temporal displacement map • temporal movementtime slicingtime-based art • time-based phenomena • time-motion studiesToshio Iwaivideo and digital art • videogram • Virgil Wildrich • William Larson • Zbig Rybczynski

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
07 DECEMBER 2013

A history of colour organs and visual music

"'The early history of this art was driven by an interest in color. In the eighteenth century, a Jesuit priest, Louis Bertrand Castel, invented the first color organ. Others, including D.D. Jameson, Bainbridge Bishop, and A. Wallace Rimington, created color organs through the next century [2]."

(Maura McDonnell, 2002)

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1730 • 1742 • 18th century • Alexander Scriabin • Alexander Wallace Rimington • amplitudeanalogue correspondence • Arnaldo Ginna • Audiovisual Environment Suite (AVES) • Bainbridge Bishop • Bruno Corra • clavecin oculaire • Clavilux • colourcolour and music • colour and sound • colour light • colour music • colour organ • colour tone • coloured light • coloured notes • compositioncorrelative analogue • D.D. Jameson • experimental instrument • experimental musical instrumentFernand Leger • Fred Callopy • Georg Telemann • GesamtkunstwerkGolan LevinHans Richter • harpsichord • Harry SmithhueinventionJames WhitneyJohn Whitneykeyboard • Lejf Marcussen • Len Lye • Leopold Survage • light organ • Louis Bertrand Castel • Luigi RussoloMan RayMarcel Duchamp • Mary Ellen Bute • Maura McDonnell • music historymusical instrumentNorman McLaren • Ocular Harpsichord • organOskar Fischinger • Paul Friedlander • piano style keyboard • pitch to hue • projected light • Prometheus (mythology) • rhythmiclight • Roy De Maistre • soundStan Brakhagesynaesthesia • synesthesia • Thomas Wilfred • timbre • tone colour • Viking Eggelingvisual music • Wallace Rimington • Walter Ruttmann • Wurlitzer

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
08 FEBRUARY 2010

Decode: Digital Design Sensations

"Decode: Digital Design Sensations showcases the latest developments in digital and interactive design, from small, screen–based, graphics to large–scale interactive installations. The exhibition includes works by established international artists and designers such as Daniel Brown, Golan Levin, Daniel Rozin, Troika and Karsten Schmidt. The exhibition features both existing works and new commissions created especially for the exhibition.

Decode is a collaboration between the V&A and onedotzero, a contemporary arts organisation operating internationally with a remit to promote innovation across all forms of moving image and interactive arts.

The exhibition explores three themes: Code presents pieces that use computer code to create new works and looks at how code can be programmed to create constantly fluid and ever–changing works. Interactivity looks at works that are directly influenced by the viewer. Visitors will be invited to interact with and contribute to the development of the exhibits. Network focuses on works that comment on and utilise the digital traces left behind by everyday communications and looks at how advanced technologies and the internet have enabled new types of social interaction and mediums of self–expression."

(The Victoria and Albert Museum, UK)

Video capture from Recode by Karsten Schmidt for the Decode website, 2009.

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2010abstractioncode • computer code • creative practiceDaniel BrownDaniel Rozindata • Decode • Decode: Digital Design Sensationsdesigndesign formalismdevicediagramdigital art exhibitiondigital culturedigital design • digital traces • exhibitionfluidgenerativeGolan Levininformation aestheticsinstallationinteractioninteractive artsinteractive designinteractivityInternet • Karsten Schmidt • ludicmedia artnetworknew medianotation • onedotzero • pattern • Recode (exhibition) • self-expressionsocial interactionspectacletechnology • The Porter Gallery • Troika • UKVictoria and Albert Museumvisual communicationvisualisation

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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