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Which clippings match 'Computer Graphics' keyword pg.1 of 4
09 NOVEMBER 2016

The vaporwave aesthetic and the music playing behind an infomercial for public access purgatory

"Vaporwave isn’t just something you listen to either, it’s something you experience, and experiences include visuals. Vaporwave visual art, simply referred to as 'aesthetics,' is varied but tends to honor some core tenets. If you’re looking at something pink and teal with a marble classical bust and a glitchy Windows 95 logo, you’re probably looking at a vaporwave aesthetic. If you’re watching a YouTube video with a title written in a weirdly soothing stretched out font, you’re probably watching a vaporwave aesthetic.

If you haven’t guessed by now, vaporwave is a bit of a joke, or more accurately, an internet meme. Vaporwave’s trippy immediate artistic ancestor 'seapunk' was a running inside joke on Tumblr during 2011 about fashion and art and music inspired by the ocean. The look and sound of a psychedelic club run by a hipster Ariel from The Little Mermaid is a pretty accurate summation. Neon seapunk imagery even found its way into Rihanna’s 2012 Saturday Night Live performance, confounding many viewers with its colorful and stylish but garish, cheap, and seemingly unprofessional grainy green screen look. The exact difference between seapunk and vaporwave is blurry, but as far as I understand vaporwave trades the aquatic focus for a fascination with the emptiness of aging and/or amateur glossy commercialism. It’s the music playing behind an infomercial for public access purgatory."

(Jordan Minor, 03 June 2016)

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1980s retro styleamateur cultural production • amateur glossy commercialism • anti-corporate aesthetic • appropriationcheesy • classical bust • colour schemecolourfulcomputer graphicsconsumption spectacle • cultural aesthetic • digital texts • emptiness • fan art • Floral Shoppe (2011) • inside joke • internet art form • internet cultureInternet memeirony • Japanese funk • Macintosh Plus (musical alias) • manipulating samples • manufactured nostalgia • marble • memenetworked productionnew forms of expression • new sincerity • nostalgic styleoceanparticipatory mediapinkpsychedelic imageryreappropriationremix cultureretro computer graphics • runaway consumerism • seapunk • Sega Genesis • Simpsonwave • Simpsonwave aesthetic • slow jams • stretched out font • teal • tech-fueled nostalgic loop • tech-savvy • The Little Mermaid • The Simpsons (television) • trippy • Tumblrvaporware • vaporwave • vaporwave aesthetic • vaporwave visual art • Vektroid (electronic musician) • video gamesvisual aestheticsWindows 95

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
12 NOVEMBER 2014

Remediation: current media remediates older and newer media

"It would seem, then, that all mediation is remediation. We are not claiming this as an a priori truth, but rather arguing that at this extended historical moment, all current media function as remediators and that remediation offer us a means of interpreting the work of earlier media as well. Our culture conceives of each medium or constellation of media as it responds to, redeploys, competes with, and reforms other media. In the first instance, we may think of something like a historical progression, of newer media remediating older ones and in particular of digital media remediating their predecessors. But ours is a genealogy of affiliations, not a linear history, and in this genealogy, older media can also remediate newer ones.[3] Television can and does refashion itself to resemble the World Wide Web [p.189], and film can and does incorporate and attempt to contain computer graphics within its own linear form. [p.153] No medium, it seems, can now function independently and establish its own separate and purified space of cultural meaning."

(David Bolter and Richard Grusin, 55.p, 2000)

David Bolter and Richard Grusin (2000). Mediation and Remediation. "Remediation: Understanding New Media", The MIT Press.

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2000computer graphics • cultural meaning • current media • David Bolterdigital mediafilm • genealogy of affiliations • historical progression • incorporation • linear form • media • media constellation • media formsmediationmedium • newer media • not a linear history • older media • refashion • remediating older media forms • remediation • remediators • Richard Grusintelevisionworld wide web

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
15 APRIL 2014

Computer simulated evolution of virtual creatures (1994)

"This narrated computer animation shows results from a research project involving simulated Darwinian evolutions of virtual block creatures. A population of several hundred creatures is created within a supercomputer, and each creature is tested for their ability to perform a given task, such the ability to swim in a simulated water environment. The successful survive, and their virtual genes containing coded instructions for their growth, are copied, combined, and mutated to make offspring for a new population. The new creatures are again tested, and some may be improvements on their parents. As this cycle of variation and selection continues, creatures with more and more successful behaviors can emerge.

The creatures shown are results the final products from many independent simulations in which they were selected for swimming, walking, jumping, following, and competing for control of a green cube."

(Karl Sims, Internet Archive)

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1994animal locomotion • artificial evolution • artificial life • coded instructions • competing for control • computer animationcomputer graphicscomputer simulation • evolutionary biology • evolutionary changesevolutionary determinismevolutionary theoryflappinggenetic artgenetic evolutiongeometric formsInternet Archive • Karl Sims • life formlocomotionmechanical beingmutation • natural selection • new forms of life • offspring • organismprimitive logicresearch projectSIGGRAPHsimulated environment • successful behaviours • supercomputer • survival of the fittestswimmingsynthetic biologysynthetic-life • variation and selection • virtual creatures • virtual genes • walking

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
05 APRIL 2014

What is skeuomorphism?

Dan "O'Hara argues that, strictly speaking, the term skeuomorphism refers only to those vestigial elements in nature or artefact that survive from an original form, even though they are no longer required. At its broadest, this definition extends to the levers and dials in a modern aircraft cockpit, for example, which no longer connect to systems directly, but instead are merely inputs and outputs of a computer that actually controls things. Such controls are skeumorphs because they are holdovers from the days before computerised aircraft, and have been left in their original form for the benefit of pilots, who are used to them working in a particular way.

So can a digital depiction of something properly be called a skeuomorph? It is more accurate to refer to it as a visual metaphor that calls to mind a physical skeuomorph without really being one. The iPhone's notification panel, with its imitation linen effect, was not descended from an object that was once made of linen. The switch that, say, allows you to switch an iPhone into Airplane Mode is not an on–screen replacement for what used to be a physical switch. In the early days of graphical user interfaces, designers employed familiar devices, such as folders, trash cans and other objects commonplace in the office. The result was that operating systems ended up being littered with depictions of things that had never existed inside a digital device; the on–screen 'trash' icon is not the vestigial remnant of an actual trash can that was once part of the computer, which is why it is really a metaphor, not a skeumorph. (That said, as computer graphics became more detailed, the original blocky icons gave way to more detailed depictions of trash cans, folders and so forth, which are arguably skeuomorphs of visual metaphors.)"

(Glenn Fleishman, 25 June 2013, The Economist)

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1889 • actual object • Apple • Apple iOS 7 • archaeologyauthenticitycomputer graphicscultural materialism • Dan OHara • digital depiction • familiar devices • faux leather • faux wood panelling • folder • Glenn Fleishman • graphical user interface • holdover • imitation • iOS 7 • metaphor • Microsoft Windows 8 • Microsoft Windows Phone 7 • nostalgiaobsolescence • on-screen replacement • on-screen textures • operating systemornamental designornamental form • physical skeuomorph • romanticism • Scott Forstall • skeumorph • skeuomorphskeuomorphic designskeuomorphismThe Economisttrash can • vestigial remnant • visual depictionvisual metaphor • visual representations • visual simulation • Windows 8 interface • Windows Phone 7 • wood panelling

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
03 MARCH 2014

Motion + Design Centre: an animated history of motion graphics

"Motion Plus Design est un projet qui a pour but de créer un centre d'exposition dédié au Motion Design à Paris. Ce projet vise dans un premier temps à définir le motion design au grand public, le but final étant de réussir à créer un centre physique dédié au motion design à Paris."

(Mattias Peresini, 18 Juin 2012, Mattrunks)

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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