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Which clippings match 'Constructed Reality' keyword pg.1 of 2
21 JUNE 2013

Photobombing: foregrounding the constructed reality of photographic scenes

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breaking the fourth wallconstructed reality • diminish • distracting attentiondistracting behaviourdistraction • divert attention • extradiegeticfocus • foregrounding constructedness • grab our attentionhuman behaviourhumourintertextuality • non-diegetic • out of the spotlight • photobomb • photobombing • photographic portraitplayfulnessprankreflexive foregroundingreflexivitysnapshotssurprise • the space of the photograph • trivialisationundermine • upstage • upstagingworld of the image

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
03 MARCH 2011

The camera's relation to reality is addressed directly by the documentary filmmaker

"The issue of the camera's relation to reality, which permeates the fiction film, is addressed directly by the documentary filmmaker, who has always aspired toward capturing the sight and sound of life in an unobtrusive and impartial manner. The ambivalent nature of the medium, which excludes the human element as an intermediary but nevertheless implies a subjective viewpoint, gives rise to issues concerning the camera's legitimacy to record the 'obscene' object of reality. Questions about what degrees of faithfulness to the truth establish a film as a documentary, and whether such faithfulness is even possible, have accompanied the history of documentary filmmaking since its origin.

In the meantime, partly due to the technological advancements, documentary underwent a revival, and experimentations with the new technology abounded. The answer of 'direct cinema', which included Richard Leacock, Donn A. Pennebaker and the Maysles brothers as its representatives, was a purist approach in which the impact of the observer on the observed had to be kept to a minimum. Interviews, voice–over commentary and any other forms of interaction with the subject matter were considered to contaminate the result of the observation. Others like, Pierre Perrault, used the new equipment to draw meaning from the seemingly insignificant and the quotidian, attempting to find greater meaning in and unity to the whole by observing and bringing together the small elements of everyday life."

(Barbara Bruni, Senses of Cinema)

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ambivalence • Andre Bazinauthorial intrusion • Chronicle of a Summer • cinema veritecommentaryconstructed realitydirect cinemadocumentarydocumentary filmmakerdocumentary filmmakingdocumentary truthDonn A. Pennebaker • Edgar Morin • ethnographiceveryday lifeexperimentationfiction filmimpartiality • intermediary • interviewJean Rouch • Lightning Over Water • Maysles Brothersmedium • Nicholas Ray • observation • Pierre Perrault • realityRichard LeacockSenses of Cinema (journal)subjective viewpointtechnological advancements • The Human Pyramid • truth • unobtrusive • voice-over • voice-over commentary

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
19 FEBRUARY 2011

Maysles Brothers: Salesman (1968)

"A landmark American documentary, Salesman captures in vivid detail the bygone era of the door–to–door salesman. While laboring to sell a gold–embossed version of the Good Book, Paul Brennan and his colleagues target the beleaguered masses–then face the demands of quotas and the frustrations of life on the road. Following Brennan on his daily rounds, the Maysles discover a real–life Willy Loman, walking the line from hype to despair."

(mubi.com)

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1968Albert Maysles • all-American • American dreamAmerican lifeBiblebygone era • Charles McDevitt • Charlotte Zwerinconstructed realityDavid Maysles • Death of a Salesman • desperationdirect cinemadocumentary filmdocumentary truth • door-to-door salesman • emotive manipulationethicseverydayfilm • Good Book • hype • James Baker • landmarkMaysles Brothers • Paul Brennan • profilmic • Raymond Martos • realreal-lifesales and profitSalesman (1968) • salesmen • salespeoplesocial realismsocial realitytruth • Willy Loman

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
05 JANUARY 2009

The Einstein’s Brain Project: revealing the constructed nature of immersive virtual reality

"If there is a single general expectation of the recent advances in the technologies of virtual reality and hyper–interactive simulation it is that of its capacity to present an ever–increasing realism. The quest for seamlessly reproduced worlds is paramount in the military and institutional development of the simulation technologies. The ideal (achievable or otherwise) of immersive virtual reality consists of surrounding an individual with images, sounds and behaviours so apparently like those of the real world that the body and consequently the brain is fooled into thinking it is in that world. These developing strategies are those of realism rid of expression, symbol or metaphor and they are sustained by the authorities of homogeneity and seamlessness. Just as long rendering times and their outcome of low frame rates are constantly, and expensively, fought against because they disturb the seamlessness and the effectiveness of the illusion so ruptures in the content and the consumption of the worlds are discouraged. Stopping to consider the strangeness of a sound distorted by being played too slowly or the flickering or jerkiness of an image disrupts our sense of ourselves as being in normal relations with a world. Similarly the consideration of a subtext or a hidden meaning draws attention to our consideration and away from the construction and sustenance of our normal relationship to the world. One must see these contemporary desires as linked to a history of naturalism, its concurrent dualistic pairing of reality and appearance and the authority and correctness of institutional space."

(Alan Dunning, Paul Woodrow, Morley Hollenberg)

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constructed reality • Einsteins Brain • hyper-interactive • illusionimmersivemetaphornaturalismrealismrupture • seamlessness • simulationsymbolismvirtual realityVRworld • Zeuxis

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
15 DECEMBER 2008

Robert J. Flaherty: How I Filmed Nanook of the North

"New forms of travel film were coming out and the Johnson South Sea Island film particularly seemed to me to be an earnest of what might be done in the North. I began to believe that a good film depicting the Eskimo and his fight for existence in the dramatically barren North might be well worth while. To make a long story short, I decided to go north again– this time wholly for the purpose of making films."
(Robert J. Flaherty, 1922)

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1922Alaska Native peopleconstructed realitydiscoverydocu-dramadocumentary filmenvironment • Eskimo • ethnographic filmfilmfilm-maker • igloo • IndigenousInuit • Nanook of the North • naturepioneer • Robert J. Flaherty • spectacle • travel film • truth

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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