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Which clippings match 'Indigenous Australians' keyword pg.1 of 4
19 JANUARY 2016

Love Punks: online game created by Australian Indigenous kids

"The Love Punks online game was created by a gang of 9,10 and 11 year old Love Punks from Roebourne in WA. For the last 8 months the Love Punks have been sweating it out, in 40 degree heat, on computers creating stop motion animations of themselves and friends in photoshop and flash."

(26 April 2012)

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2012 • 9-11 year olds • Aboriginal Australian kids • Aboriginal culture • Aboriginal kids • Adobe Flash • bearded dragon • Big hART • Burrup Peninsula • childhood imagination • Chynna Campbell • comic bookcommunity participatory projectcreative participationdesert • designers of the future • disadvantaged communitiesDIY • Duncan Gates • First Nations youthfroggame designgreen screenhomemade gamesimagineeringIndigenous Australiansindigenous community • indigenous games and play • Indigenous people • Indigenous young people • interactive comic • kids • lizard • Lovepunks Game • mining • mud flats • Murujuga • NEOMAD • online game • outdoor game • peacockpersonal empowerment • Pilbara desert • pogona • remote communities • Roebourne • salt flats • Satellite Sisters • sea • social arts • stop motion animationstop-frame animation • Stu Campbell • Telen Rodwell • Trevor Jamieson • video gamevideo games and Indigenous peopleWestern Australia • Woodside (natural gas company) • Yijala Yala Project • young designersyoung peoplezombie

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
01 NOVEMBER 2015

Brett Leavy: The Virtual Meanjin Project

"Brett Leavy is an immersive heritage specialist, virtual historian and artist. His innovative idea to recreate the real environment for mapping Indigenous culture and heritage stems from his passion to educate the community about Indigenous history."

(ABC Open)

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ABC Open • arts and cultural practices • Australian Indigenous communities • Brett Leavycultural heritagecultural identitycultural spacesculture and customs • culture and heritage • First Nationsfloraflora and faunafood gathering activities • guesstimation • historical recreation • Human Ventures • immersive gaming • immersive heritage • immersive heritage experienceIndigenous AustraliansIndigenous communitiesIndigenous cultural knowledge • Indigenous culture • Indigenous heritageindigenous history • Indigenous stories • interactive immersive simulation experience • Jagera people • social enterprise • Turrabull people • virtual environmentvirtual heritage • virtual heritage environments • virtual historian • Virtual Meanjin • virtual recreationvirtual time machineVirtual Warrane ll

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
02 MAY 2015

Aboriginal People's Relationship to Land

"Every different clan group has stories about their beginnings. Stories are like our archives, detailing how Creator Beings from under the earth arose to shape the land and to create the landscape. There are myriad variations of the story, but the theme stays the same.

The whole surface of the earth was like a moonscape, no features, no flora and fauna, just bare open plain. But there were Creator Beings sleeping in a state of potentiality just under the surface. At a certain time they were disturbed, whereupon their potentiality transformed into actuality and they arose out of the ground. When they finally emerged, they were very big and tall. These beings were spirit ancestors of many of the varieties of flora and fauna, especially large animals, in Australia. When this emergence was completed, the spirit ancestors started to interact with one another, fighting, dancing, running about, making love, killing. All of this activity shaped the Australian landscape as we know it today.

Throughout this period humans remained asleep in various embryonic forms, in a state like a kind of proto-humanity. They were awakened by all the activity above; the Creator Beings helped these proto-humans to become fully human, teaching them the Laws of custodianship of land, the Laws of kinship, of marriage, of correct ceremonies-they gave them every kind of knowledge they needed to look after the land and to have a stable society.

When this work was finished, the Creator Beings went back into the land, where they all still remain in the same eternal sleep from which they awakened at the beginning of time. The locations to which they returned have always been and are still today regarded as very important sacred sites.

Wherever the Creator Beings travelled, they left tracks or some kind of evidence of themselves. These traces determined the identity of the people. In other words, every Aboriginal person has a part of the essence of one of the original creative spirits who formed the Australian landscape. Therefore each person has a charter of custodianship empowering them and making them responsible for renewing that part of the flora and its fauna. The details of this metaphysics varied widely across the land with the physical environment, but the spiritual basis-the understanding that what separates humans from animals is the fact that each human bears a creative and spiritual identity which still resides in land itself-provided and still provides in many places the religious, social, political and economic force throughout Aboriginal Australia."

(Mary Graham, 2008)

Australian Humanities Review 45 (November 2008): "Mary Graham: Philosophical Underpinnings of Aboriginal Worldviews". This essay was originally published in Worldviews: Environment, Culture, Religion 3 (1999): 105-118.

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Aboriginal Australia • Aboriginal mythology • Aboriginal worldviews • ancestral beings • Association for the Study of Australian Literature (ASAL) • Australian Humanities Review (AHR) • Australian landscape • beginnings • belonging • charter of custodianship • clan • clan group • creation narrative • creative and spiritual identity • Creator Beings • custodianship • customs • embryonic forms • eternal sleep • fauna • florafolkloreIndigenous Australians • Juanita Bailey • Kombu-merri person • landland custodianshiplandmarkslandscape • Lilla Watson • Lin Morrow • Mary Grahammetaphysics • open plain • origin mythphysical environment • potentiality • proto-human • proto-humanity • sacred sites • spirit ancestors • symbolic placetimeless time • under the earth • under the surface • worldview

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
16 JANUARY 2015

Pilger's message to white Australia cannot be dismissed

"Mainstream Australia has long lacked a real education about Aboriginal people, about our shared history, and this nation's brutal past. Fortunately, there's a simple way in–an opportunity to get a 'punter's guide' to the truth about the treatment of Aboriginal Australians."

(Sol Bellear, 2 March 2014)

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2013Aboriginal Australians • Aboriginal elder • Aboriginal Medical Service • Aboriginal peopleAlan LoweryapartheidatrocitiesAustralia • Australia Day • blackfellas • Bob Randall • brutal treatment • colonisationconcentration campcultural hegemony • death in custody • documentary film • Edmund Barton • eugenicsFirst Australiansforced sterilizationgenocide • Gina Rinehart • half-caste • indifferenceIndigenous AustraliansIndigenous peopleinjusticeJohn Pilger • Lang Hancock • mainstream Australia • Noel Nannup • non-Aboriginal Australia • Northern Territoryplaying godpolice brutalitypovertyracial inequalityreconciliation • reparations • Rosie Kunoth-Monks • Rottnest Island • Sol Bellear • South Australiastolen generations • uncomfortable truths • Utopia (2013) • Vince Forrester • vox pops • Warren Snowdon • Western Australiawhite Australia policywhite settlement • whitefellas

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
07 NOVEMBER 2014

Songlines: How Indigenous Australians Use Music to Mark Geography

"There are many different methods of pre–literate navigation that have been documented around the world. One of the most unique, a fusion of navigation and oral mythological storytelling, originated among the indigenous peoples of Australia, who navigated their way across the land using paths called songlines or dreaming tracks. In Aboriginal mythology, a songline is a myth based around localised 'creator–beings' during the Dreaming, the indigenous Australian embodiment of the creation of the Earth. Each songline explains the route followed by the creator–being during the course of the myth. The path of each creator–being is marked in sung lyrics. One navigates across the land by repeating the words of the song or re–enacting the story through dance, which in the course of telling the story also describe the location of various landmarks on the landscape (e.g. rock formations, watering holes, rivers, trees). In some cases, the paths of the creator–beings are said to be evident from their marks on the land (petrosomatoglyphs), such as large depressions in the land which are said to be their footprints (parallels can certainly be seen in some North American First Nation creation stories).

Songlines often came in sequences, much like a symphony or album today. By singing a song cycle in the appropriate order could navigate vast distances, often travelling through the deserts of Australia's interior (a fact which amazed early anthropologists who were stunned by Aborigines that frequently walked across hundreds of kilometres of desert picking out tiny features along the way without error). Each group had its own set of songlines that were passed from generation to generation so that future generations would know how to navigate when in neighbouring tribes' territories. The extensive system of songlines in Australia varied in length from a few kilometres to hundreds of kilometres in length crossing through lands of many different Indigenous peoples. Since a songline can span the lands of several different language groups, different parts of some songlines were in different languages corresponding to the region the songline was navigating through at the time, and thus could only be fully understood by a person speaking all of the languages in the song."

(The Basement Geographer, 21 October 2010)

Fig.1 "What are song lines?" Colin Jones, lecturer in Aboriginal History, talks about his culture, his history and his art. Queensland Rural Medical Education.

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Aboriginal mythologyancestral beings • ancestral heroes • animist belief systemAustralia • Colin Jones • creation narrative • creation spirits • Creator Beingscultural memory • cultural webs of memory • dreaming (spirituality) • dreaming tracks • earth motherFirst AustraliansFirst Nations • genii loci • geographical point • Indigenous Australians • kin-grouping system • kinship • landmarkslandscapelocationmappingmarkers • mythological storytelling • navigation systemnavigational methodsoral historiesorientationorigin myth • paths • petrosomatoglyph • place • point-to-point • pre-literate navigation • pre-literate societiessequences and spatial practisessmooth space • song cycle • songlinesspatial literacyspatial narrativespiritualitysymbolic placeterritorytimeless timetopology • totemic ancestors • voice map • watering holewayfinding

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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