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Which clippings match 'Constellations' keyword pg.1 of 5
27 JANUARY 2012

Adorno's ambitions for the constellation

"17. But I am eliciting these implications of Adorno's reservations about Gestalt because what they imply is what Adorno leaves unsaid here, namely the contrast with his ambitions for the constellation. I should caution here that Adorno sometimes uses the word 'constellation' to designate historically given, that is, already familiarized, ideological arrays or Gestalts [for example, Critical Models 138, 260]; my usage henceforth will connote 'constellation' in the sense Adorno valorizes, as a device with the potential to be turned, in somewhat the manner of the Brechtian V–effect, against such familiarizations (though just this dissident potential, of course, is what mid–century avant–gardists were seizing on in Gestalt). And as we'll see, the word's 'antithetical' reversals of meaning are themselves indices of the 'dialectical'–ness of Adorno's immanent critique. We might say that these 'antithetical' meanings––'constellation' as unconscious ideological synthesis versus 'constellation' as consciousness–raising estrangement; 'constellation' as object of critique, or as subject of it––are themselves a kind of constellation implying or encoding, concealing or de–familiarizing a narrative, that of the classic Enlightenment project summarized by Freud in the formula, 'making the unconscious conscious.' Adorno may 'repeat' an over–familiar constellation and then reliquify (or, Medusa–like, petrify) its 'congelations'; or he may present an unfamiliar and even shocking juxtaposition, whose estrangement is to provoke a new and heightened consciousness of the ideological condition in which we are entrapped. The historical image that results, ideological and critical all at once, appropriates the critical force we saw Adorno ascribing to the Benjaminian dialectical image, turning it, immanently, to estranging or defamiliarizing, sc. critical or (Hegel) 'negative' purposes."

(Steven Helmling, 2003)

Steven Helmling (2003). "Constellation and Critique: Adorno's Constellation, Benjamin's Dialectical Image", Postmodern Culture, Volume 14, Number 1, September 2003 | 10.1353/pmc.2003.0030

TAGS

antithetical • avant-garde • avant-gardists • Benjaminian • Bertolt Brecht • Brechtian V-effect • concealing • congelations • consciousconsciousness • consciousness-raising estrangement • constellations • critical force • critical models • critique • de-familiarising • defamiliarising • dialectical • dialectical image • encodingEnlightenment project • estrangement • estranging • familiarisations • Georg Hegelgestalt • gestalts • historical image • historically given • ideological arrays • ideological condition • juxtaposition • making the unconscious • Medusanarrative • object of critique • Sigmund Freud • subject of critique • Theodor Adorno • unconscious ideological synthesis • Walter Benjamin

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
28 APRIL 2010

An assemblage of connecting parts that defies traditional climactic and dissipative character

"The complexities already evident in L'anti–oedipe are compounded by Deleuze and Guattari's deliberate refusal to propose a central narrative or theme for the book [A Thousand Plateaus: Capitalism and Schizophrenia]. They refer to the sections in Mille plateaux as 'plateaus', a term they derived from the anthropological work of Gregory Bateson. Bateson had used the term to describe the libidinal economy he found in Bali, which differed from that in the West, with its emphasis on climax. Deleuze and Guattari intended that the sections of their book should not reproduce the climactic and dissipative character of Western discourse, as manifested in the traditional book format with its culminations and terminations. They hoped rather that each plateau would operate as part of an assemblage of connecting parts to be approached by the reader in whichever order they chose. As this might suggest Mille plateaux is a complex and difficult book, though, at the same time, extraordinarily compelling."

(Charlie Gere)

Gere, Charlie. 2002 'Digital Culture' Reaktion Books. ISBN 1861891431 1861891431 (pbk.)

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TAGS

anthropologyassemblage • Bali • bookbook formatCharlie Gere • climactic • climax • connecting parts • constellationscontingencycritical theorydiscoursediscursive field • dissipative • Félix GuattariGilles DeleuzeGregory BatesonIndonesia • L'anti-oedipe • libidinalnarrativeordering • plateau • plateaus • postmodernismstructurethemetraditionWestern

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
08 MARCH 2010

Encyclopaedia is assumed as an historical production always incomplete, unfinished, precarious, condemned to the voracity of knowledge progress

"In the line of [Francis] Bacon Instauratio Magna, encyclopaedia is assumed as an historical production always incomplete, unfinished, precarious, condemned to the voracity of knowledge progress: "it does not suppose that the work can be altogether completed within one generation, but provides for its being taken up by another"[1]

If encyclopaedia is never a dictionary, yet they have one point in common. They both are discontinuous texts made of independent segments or entries, either alphabetically organised or structured in larger conceptual, thematic or disciplinary frameworks. Those semantic fields never present well–defined borders. Each entry opens (explicitly or implicitly) to other entries which, in turn, open to others in such a way that each entry is virtually connected with all others. In that sense, encyclopaedia is not so much a monumental reunion of all knowledge in one closed place, but the free circulation of unity throughout the dense and sensual effectivity of its volumes and pages. Not a static totality but a dynamic entity, not a mausoleum but a "living intellectual force" as Otto Neurath, the big organiser of neo–positivist International Encyclopaedia of Unified Science (1937–38) used to say [3]. Not an additive totality but a vast, waving horizon, a net of multidimensional elements which can be connected according to multiple relationships. That is to say, encyclopaedia supposes a deep, floating continuity underlying its superficial discontinuity. This is the point in which encyclopaedia most clearly revels itself as a strong configuration of the unity of science. In fact, it is the only attempt of unification of knowledge, which is effectively realised, the only material realisation of unity of science that condenses and presents to the eyes of everybody a large scope of materials, which could never be confronted in any other way."

(Olga Pombo)

[1] F. Bacon, Instauratio Magna, Preface, in The Works of Francis Bacon, edited by J. Spedding, 1857–1874, London: Ellis and Heath, vol. IV: 21.

[3] I quote Neurath from his famous "Unified Science and Encyclopaedic Integration": 'a living being and not a phantom, not a mausoleum or an herbarium, but a living intellectual force', "Unified Science and Encyclopaedic Integration", in O. Neurath (ed.), International Encyclopaedia of Unified Science, Chicago/Illinois: The University of Chicago Press, 1938, vol. I: 26.

Leibniz and the Encyclopaedic Project, Actas del Congresso Internacional Ciência, Tecnologia Y Bien Comun: La Catualidad de Leibniz (Valência, 21–23 Marzo de 2001), Valencia: Editorial de la Universidas Politecnica de Valencia, 2002, pp. 267–278.

TAGS

becomingconstellationsdictionarydiscursive fieldencyclopaediaFrancis BaconGottfried Leibnizhorizon • Instauratio Magna • mausoleum • multidimensional • orderingOtto Neurath • segment • semantic • unification of knowledge

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
13 FEBRUARY 2010

Centre for Material Digital Culture

"A DECADE after the first Internet boom and the parallel explosion of the connected fields of new media studies, techno–cultural studies, cyber–cultural studies, new medium studies, there is still much discussion of innovation, but there is also an understanding that the first moment of the new has passed. New media has a history, as well as present and future – and of course, it always did. Today, the dynamic of continuity and transformation intrinsic to the relationship between technology and culture can be drawn differently. Innovation continues. Technologists declare web 2.0; the stress shifts from the screen–world to the penetration of the real–world environment by pervasive and intimate forms of new media. New forms of new media continue to arrive; content develops and original modes of use, forms of association, ways of writing or thinking together, spring up. Continuity reasserts itself. Processes of remediation transform old media, but not beyond all recognition. Much remains of 'good old television' in the world of digital TV, the aesthetics of radio persist as it is delivered to us over the net or as a pod–cast, and the conventions and economy of the traditional cinematic apparatus translate into the world of DVD and digital screening in forms we recognize and find familiar. Even the truly innovative media forms, those springing up out of digital technology, now have substantial development histories, their own traditions, and increasingly their own conventions. These last are expressed in code, articulated in the physical architecture of new media networks, found in the dispositions or habitus of users, evident in the consolidation of various genres, and evident also in the contested but provisionally secured cultural capitals circulating around various new media formations.

AT THIS POINT, with this new balance in mind, it is legitimate and timely to re–define the object and its significance, to ask what 'digital culture' or 'networked culture' entails. And so this centre sets out to re–assess forms of thinking about new media technologies as material digital cultures. It asks what material properties, what symbolic properties, what affective or sense perceptive regimes and what political economies, are now invoked under the banner of new media. It explores how the networked digital culture in which we live can be defined and critiqued. And, it argues that this is a moment when new media theory also needs to be re–assessed: What forms of thinking about processes of convergence worked? What were their outcomes? Are they productive in generating ways of thinking and investigating the developing and established new media ecologies within which we now live?"

(Joanne Whiting, University of Sussex)

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TAGS

connectivityconstellationsconvergencecultural capitalcultural codes • cyber-cultural studies • digital culturediscoverydiscursive field • forms of association • habitus • innovative media forms • interactionInternetintimatematerial culturemedia ecologiesnetworked culturenetworks • new media studies • new media theory • new medium studies • old mediapervasivepodcast • real-world environment • remediationrepresentationresearchresearch centre • screen-world • techno-cultural studies • technology and culturetheory building • thinking together • transformationUKways of thinkingWeb 2.0

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
06 JANUARY 2010

Russell Group: 20 leading UK universities

"The Russell Group represents the 20 leading UK universities which are committed to maintaining the very best research, an outstanding teaching and learning experience and unrivalled links with business and the public sector."

(Russell Group)

[In the UK the Russell Group represent the traditional and 'red brick' universities and the 'Million+ group' represents the new or 'Plate Glass' universities.There is a similar equivalence in Australia between the more traditional 'sandstone universities' and the 'new' or 'Post–1992 universities'.]

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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