Not Signed-In
Which clippings match 'Conservatism' keyword pg.1 of 1
15 AUGUST 2017

Cognitive closure and the price of certainty

"during times of fear and anxiety — like, for example, right now — everybody’s need for closure increases. We tend to make judgments more quickly, regardless of the facts. We’re also drawn to leaders who are decisive and paint solutions in simple terms. After the attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, Dr. Kruglanski and his team of researchers found that as the color-coded terrorism threat system increased, support for President George W. Bush went up accordingly. The more uncertain our world seems, the more we compensate by seeking out certainty."

(Daniele Anastasion, 1 November 2016, The New York Times)

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TAGS

2016 • alt-right • ambiguityappeal to emotion • Arie Kruglanski • be vigilant • binary thinking • cognitive closure • cognitive flexibilitycolour codingcomplex problem-solvingcomplexityconfused and disorientedconservatism • conservative thought • contradictory perspectivescritical thinking • Daniele Anastasion • decision-making capabilitiesdestabilised perceptionDonald Trump • Eric Strauss • exploiting fearsextremismfear mongeringfound to be true by manygaslightingGeorge W Bushgullibilityliberal tolerancemainstream medianationalism • need for certainty • need for closure • New York TimesOp-Docsperceptions of reality • personal agency • polarised politics • post-truth worldrhetorical fearscare tacticsscaremongeringSeptember 11 attacksshort documentarysimple evaluationssocial psychologysound judgmentspreading of fear • terrorism threat system • terrorist threat • times of fear and anxiety • truth • uncertain world • uncertainty • uncertainty avoidance

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
15 JUNE 2009

Phillip Blond: Rise of the red Tories

"We live in a time of crisis. In such times humans retreat to safety, and build bulwarks against the future. The financial emergency is having this effect on Britain's governing class. Labour has withdrawn to the safety of the sheltering state, and the comforts of its first income tax rise since the mid–1970s. Meanwhile, the Conservatives appear to be proposing a repeat of Thatcherite austerity in the face of economic catastrophe. But this crisis is more than an ordinary recession. It represents a disintegration of the idea of the 'market state' and makes obsolete the political consensus of the last 30 years. A fresh analysis of the ruling ideological orthodoxy is required.
...
On a deeper level, the present moment is a challenge to conservatism itself. The Conservatives are still viewed as the party of the free market, an idea that has collapsed into monopoly finance, big business and deregulated global capitalism. Tory social thinking has genuinely evolved, but the party's economic thinking is still poised between repetition and renewal. As late as August 2008 David Cameron said: 'I'm going to be as radical a social reformer as Margaret Thatcher was an economic reformer,' and that 'radical social reform is what this country needs right now.' He is right about society, but against the backdrop of collapsing markets and without a macro–economic alternative, Thatcherite economics has been wrongfooted by events."
(Phillip Blond, Prospect Magazine February 2009 issue 155)

TAGS

2009austeritycapitalismchange • civil association • conservatismConservativescrisisDavid Camerondecentralisation • financial emergency • free market economyglobal capitalismglobal financial crisisglobal financial systemLabour • late-modern • Margaret Thatcher • market state • mutualism • neoliberalism • Phillip Blond • politicspost-traditionalreformsocial change • social reform • stateTorytransformationUK • voluntary association

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
30 APRIL 2005

Visual Ideology: politics of visual language

"As graphic designers we often use the power of image to persuade, convince, reveal or to construct a contextual stage for messages. A great deal of research and consideration goes into this process of deciding what type of imagery will best convey our ideas. As visual thinkers we are accustomed to deciphering the distinctions created by color, form, scale, etc. By cropping away information or altering an images color we can more effectively represent our ideas. All of this, of course, assumes our decisions are correct, that they will elicit from the audience the desired response. But how often do we evaluate these visual decisions after the creative process has concluded? What happens to our work after it is released for public consumption?

In regard to politics the use of image is used to associate personalities with issues, display concern or patriotism and of course create negative associations as well. Notice the recent trend of political speeches in front of a backdrop of issue words or phrases such a 'economic growth' or 'healthcare.' How well do these efforts succeed? More importantly, how visually literate is the general public in terms of detecting and interpreting what they see?

Visual Ideology is an effort to raise awareness to the use of images in messaging. Given the choice, what images would the general public associate with specific ideas or words? How can one image be more meaningful than another similar image? This project asks viewers to to make decisions as to images that best represent their visual definition of political terms or ideas. During this process it is hoped that viewers will begin to develop a better understanding of how visual imagery can influence meaning. By placing the responsibility of making these visual decisions with the viewer they get to experience a part of graphic design. As graphic designers, we get to see how self defined political personalities might be visually represented. Though not necessarily a ideological map, this project will hopefully offer some insight as to how differing political personalities interpret visual information."
(http://visualideology.asoe.net/primary/summary.php)

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