Not Signed-In
Which clippings match 'Wall' keyword pg.1 of 2
21 JULY 2014

Jewish Voice for Peace: Israel/Palestine 101

Fig.1 short animated introduction to Israel–Palestine situation created by Jewish Voice for Peace.

1

TAGS

1937194719482D animationautonomyawareness raisingbelligerencecivil libertiesconflictcontested state • David Ben-Gurion • demolition • expropriation • fertile landGaza StripGeneva conventionhegemonyhistoryhistory of conflicthuman rights violationideological intoleranceillegal behaviour • illegal settlement • indignities • international community • international consensus • IsraelIsraeli-Palestinian conflictJewish peopleJewish settlers • Jewish state • Jewish Voice for Peace • Middle Eastmilitarized resistance movements • military force • militia • nationhood • occupied territory • occupying powerownershipPalestine • Palestinian Arabs • Palestinian territories • partition • partition plan • peace • Peel partition plan • Peel plan • polemic • protestrefugeerespectRonald Reagansegregationsettlement • sovereign states • sovereigntyState of IsraelState of Palestineterritorial bordersterritorialisationterritorytoleranceUnited NationsUnited Stateswallwarwar over water • West Bank • Zionist

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
07 JULY 2009

Victoria and Albert Museum: A History of Computer Art

"One of the most famous works to come out of Bell Labs was Leon Harmon and Ken Knowlton's Studies in Perception, 1967, also known as Nude.

Harmon and Knowlton decided to cover the entire wall of a senior colleague's office with a large print, the image of which was made up of small electronic symbols that replaced the grey scale in a scanned photograph. Only by stepping back from the image (which was 12 feet wide), did the symbols merge to form the figure of a reclining nude. Although the image was hastily removed after their colleague returned, and even more hastily dismissed by the institution's PR department, it was leaked into the public realm, first by appearing at a press conference in the loft of Robert Rauschenberg, and later emblazoned across the New York Times. What had started life as a work–place prank became an overnight sensation."

Fig.1 Leon Harmon and Ken Knowlton, 'Studies in Perception', 1997 (original image 1967). Museum no. E.963–2008. Given by the American Friends of the V&A through the generosity of Patric Prince.

1

TAGS

1967ASCIIASCII-Art • Bell Laboratories • Bell Labscomputer history • electronic symbols • Kenneth Knowlton • large print • Leon Harmon • New York Timesnude • overnight sensation • reclining nudeRobert Rauschenberg • Studies in Perception (1967) • wall • work-place prank

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
26 MAY 2009

David Hare: Hamas torture technique

"The victim is shown a wall on which a staircase is drawn, and at the top is a drawing of a bicycle. The victim is told to go and get the bicycle. He says he can't get the bicycle because it's a drawing. He is then told if he doesn't bring the bicycle downstairs he will be beaten."
(Eric Herschthal, A Parallax View)

[UK playwright David Hare describes a Hamas torture technique used on citizens of Gaza it considers to be collaborators. He does so in one of his monologues entitled simply 'Wall'.]

1

TAGS

bicycle • collaborator • David Hare • drawingGazaGaza StripHamasPalestinianstaircasetortureUKwall

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
26 MAY 2009

Conflict in Cities and the Contested State

"'Conflict in Cities and the Contested State' is a five year research project starting in 2007 that focuses on divided cities as key sites in territorial conflicts over state and national identities, cultures and borders. The research objectives are to analyse how divided cities in Europe and the Middle East have been shaped by ethnic, religious and national conflicts, and conversely, how such cities can absorb, resist and potentially play a role in transforming the territorial conflicts which pervade and surround them. The project seeks to understand the cities as arenas of intensified ethno–national conflicts, particularly with respect to the role that architecture and the urban fabric play as a setting and background for everyday activities and events. Phenomena related to creating, maintaining, crossing, transcending or ignoring ethnic and territorial borders, both physical and symbolic, are central to the study.

Conflict in Cities and the Contested State is generously funded by the Economic and Social Research Council of Great Britain. It builds on an earlier project begun in 2003 and supported by the ESRC."

1

TAGS

20032007architectureBelfastbelongingcitiesconflictcontested state • divided cities • Economic and Social Research CouncilESRC • ethno-national conflict • fenceidentityIrelandJerusalemnationhoodNorthern Irelandresearch project • sectarianism • spaceterritorial bordersterritory • tribalism • UKurban spacewall

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
21 OCTOBER 2008

Chronological ordering highlighting human cost of the Vietnam War

"Maya [Lin] unexpectedly won the design competition for the Vietnam Veterans Memorial while a Yale student, and it threw her into a huge storm of controversy. The controversy over Maya Lin's design showed the raw emotional wounds that still had not healed when it erupted in 1980, and Maya Lin's finished memorial showed the power of art to affect people and touch upon important issues of society.
...
Lin wanted her memorial to evoke tears in the viewers, to act as a vehicle for veterans to begin to heal from their experience. One of the most touching scenes in Freida Lee Mock's documentary is the beginning scene, watching the reaction of veterans as they look at the names of their fallen comrades in the black wall. In a particular scene, two veterans are looking at the name and one veteran exclaims, 'Look at all these names!' and he begins to cry. What most moved about these scenes was how the memorial touched these veterans, how it honoured the individuals who were killed by making them more than just a statistic. A veteran mentioned that a name may not mean much to one person, but it would mean much to another. Lin put the names in chronological, rather than alphabetical order, to help individualize the names. If the names were in alphabetical order, then a loved one would be lost in a sea of Smiths or Jones or whatever that person's last name is, and it would depersonalize that individual. It would take a person longer to look up the name and find it if the names were in chronological order, but the process would be worth it to a family member or a friend."

(Angelo Lopez, 26 May 2008)

1

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
Sign-In

Sign-In to Folksonomy

Can't access your account?

New to Folksonomy?

Sign-Up or learn more.