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20 JUNE 2017

Sons of Gallipoli: award-winning interactive documentary

"While the story of Gallipoli has been told many times, never has it been told in such a rich and deeply immersive way. For the first time, the tragedy of Gallipoli is brought to life in a profoundly human way as two mothers imagine what it must have been like for other mothers, 100 years ago. Two women on opposite sides. So different. Yet each struggling to understand the meaning of war."

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19151916ANZACAotearoa New Zealandarchive footageAustralasiaAustralia • British Commonwealth • circular interface • Commonwealth • Commonwealth countries • Commonwealth of Nations • Cook Islands • cultural heritagedigital heritageGallipoli Campaign • Gallipoli peninsula • hypermedia • immersive cultural heritage experiences • immersive storytellinginteractive digital narrativesinteractive documentaryinteractive experienceinteractive mediainteractive multimedia documentaryinteractive multimedia videointeractive web documentary • military failures • military history • Niue • Ottoman EmpirePapua New Guinea • Pitcairn Islands • Samoa • Tonga • Turkishwarweb based non-linear narrativesweb documentarywebdocWorld War IWWI

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
13 NOVEMBER 2011

Life Drama: Participatory Action Research

"Action Research is generally considered a process for achieving change and research at the same time. It is viewed as a spiralling, iterative process, with each cycle feeding into the next.

At the 'Plan' stage, the researchers determine the problem to be solved, the steps to be taken to solve the problem, and the methods to be used to evaluate how successful the solution has been. At the 'Act' stage, the agreed steps are taken. At the 'Collect' stage, the researchers collect data to determine whether change has occurred. At the 'Reflect' stage, the researchers analyse the data, discuss the findings, and determine to what extent the 'action' has helped to solve the problem. As a result of this reflection, further planning occurs, to decide what needs to happen next, and the cycle begins again.

Participatory Action Research places specific emphasis on power relationships, advocating for power to be deliberately shared between the 'researchers' and the 'researched'. Ideally, the 'researched', or the people who are expected to benefit from the action research project, are not 'objects' or 'subjects' or research but partners in the research process. They participate in planning, acting, collecting data, reflecting, and deciding how the action research cycle should continue in the next phase. In particular, the participants or co–researchers play a major role in nominating indicators, or criteria by which the project can be said to have succeeded."

(Life Drama, 2010)

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action research • action research cycle • action research project • advocacy • Brad Haseman • co-researcher • Life Drama • Marie Stopes International PNG • National AIDS Council Secretariat • Papua New Guinea • PAR Process • participationParticipatory Action Research • partners in the research process • Porgera Joint Venture • power • power relationships • power sharing • Queensland University of Technology • researched • researchers • University of Goroka • University of Papua New Guinea

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
04 JULY 2009

Mitochondrial DNA sequences in ancient Australians: Implications for modern human origins

"Lake Mungo 3 is the oldest (Pleistocene) 'anatomically modern' human from whom DNA has been recovered. His mtDNA belonged to a lineage that only survives as a segment inserted into chromosome 11 of the nuclear genome, which is now widespread among human populations. This lineage probably diverged before the most recent common ancestor of contemporary human mitochondrial genomes. This timing of divergence implies that the deepest known mtDNA lineage from an anatomically modern human occurred in Australia; analysis restricted to living humans places the deepest branches in East Africa. The other ancient Australian individuals we examined have mtDNA sequences descended from the most recent common ancestor of living humans. Our results indicate that anatomically modern humans were present in Australia before the complete fixation of the mtDNA lineage now found in all living people. Sequences from additional ancient humans may further challenge current concepts of modern human origins."

(Gregory Adcock, Elizabeth Dennis, Simon Easteal, Gavin Huttley, Lars Jermiin, William Peacock and Alan Thorne)

Adcock, G. J., E. S. Dennis, et al. (2001). "Mitochondrial DNA sequences in ancient Australians: Implications for modern human origins." Archaeology in Oceania 36(3): 163-163.

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19742001Aboriginal AustraliansAfrica • Alan Thorne • alternative explanation • anatomically modern human • ancient DNA • ancient humans • ancient peoplearchaeology • Archaeology in Oceania • AsiaAustraliaAustralian National University • bone fragments • burial ritual • cell biologychromosome • common ancestor • cremated remains • divergence • divergent selection • divergent variation • DNAEast Africa • Elizabeth Dennis • emergence of modern humans • Europe • evolutionary lineage • evolutionary process • evolutionary theoryevolutionary tree • female skeleton • fixation • fossil evidence • fossil specimen • Gavin Huttley • genetic lineage • genetic pool • genetic relationship • genetic sequence • genome • genotyping analysis • Gregory Adcock • Homo erectus • Homo sapiens • human evolutionhuman history • human populations • human speciesIndiaIndigenous Australians • Lake Mungo • Lars Jermiin • living humans • Mamanwa people • mitochondria • mitochondrial genome • modern human origins • mtDNA lineage • multiregional evolution • multiregional explanation • multiregional origin of modern humans hypothesis • Mungo Lady • Mungo Man • New South Walesochre • origin of modern humans • out-of-Africa hypothesis • Papua New GuineaPeoples Republic of China • pleistocene • Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) • Simon Easteal • simultaneous development • skeletal remains • skeletonSouth East Asianspeciation • subspecies • William Peacock

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
25 MAY 2009

National Library of Australia: Pictures Catalogue

"This catalogue contains descriptions of paintings, drawings, prints, photographs and three–dimensional objects held in the Pictures Collection of the National Library of Australia. The emphasis is on Australian material, with some material relating to New Zealand, Antarctica, Papua New Guinea and the Pacific. The main time period covered is late eighteenth century to the present day. The Collection includes thousands of portraits of significant Australians.

The Pictures Collection contains approximately 45,000 paintings and over 600,000 photographs; most of this material has been catalogued with individual descriptions or collection summaries. All these descriptions and summaries can be searched on this database.

Of the material that has been catalogued, more than 80,000 items have been digitised. These images are available through this catalogue, for research and study purposes and publication. More online images are added regularly."
(National Library of Australia, December 2005)

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18th century2005AntarcticaAotearoa New ZealandAustraliacataloguedatabasedigitisationdrawingDunedinNational Library of AustraliaOtagoPacificPapua New Guineaphotograph • Pictures Collection • printsearch • three-dimensional objects

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
25 MAY 2009

Carteret Islanders: the first climate change refugees

"Carteret Islanders of Papua New Guinea have become the first climate refugees as they relocate to new sites to escape the effects of climate change on their homeland.

According to PNG's Post Courier, the islanders moved to their new homes, Tinputz, the relocation site, last Wednesday to prepare the land for their families to move over permanently.
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There were reports in the media earlier in the year and even late last year stating that the Carteret Islanders will be the first refugees of climate change and this has come to pass."
(Solomon Islands News, 06 May 2009)


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2009 • atoll • Bouganville • Carteret Atoll • Carteret Islands • citizenshipclimate change • climate change awareness • climate change casualtycommunitydisplacementecological crisis • flooded conditions • flooding • global responsibilityisland • Kilinailau Islands • PacificPacific islandPacific RimPapua New Guinea • PNG • refugee • relocation • social changeSolomon Islandssustainability • Tinputz • traditiontransformation • Tulun

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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