Not Signed-In
Which clippings match '1990s' keyword pg.1 of 4
17 APRIL 2015

Tactical Media Files: a living archive of social-political action

"Tactical Media emerged when the modest goals of media artists and media activists were transformed into a movement that challenged everyone to produce their own media in support of their own political struggles. This "new media" activism was based on the insight that the long-held distinction between the 'street' (reality) and the 'media' (representation) could no longer be upheld. On the contrary, the media had come to infuse all of society.

To challenge dominant (strategic) structures in society, it was necessary develop new (tactical) means of producing and distributing media. Not a specialised task separate from the social movements, but a key activity around which social movements could coalesce. And of equal importance, the media environment characterised by a broadcast logic of geography was being supplemented with an environment characterised by a many-to-many logic of access.

Though much has changed these insights remain as valid today as they did in the early 1990s."

(Eric Kluitenberg and David Garcia)

Fig.1 Image from: Critical Art Ensemble, Digital Resistance: Explorations in Tactical Media, 2001. http://critical-art.net/books/digital

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1990sagency of access and engagementamateur cultural productionAmsterdamartist collectivebig media • broadcast logic • broadcast mediacollective actioncritical artcritical engagementcritical perspectivescritical practices • David Garcia • digital resistance • Eric Kluitenberg • hegemonic discourse • International Institute for Social History in Amsterdam • living archive • living practice • many-to-many • media activism • media archive • media environment • media representation • multimedia organisation • new media activism • new tactical means • participative mediapolitical action • political struggles • politics of resistance • power and agency • producing and distributing media • renewal and re-invention • social historysocial movementstactical engagementtactical media • Tactical Media Files • television programming

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
04 JANUARY 2015

The Emergency Broadcast Network

"EBN works to harness the power of multimedia audio–visual technology into the most effective electronic behavior control system.

EBN's techniques involve a collection and analysis of massive amounts of randomly recorded audio and video television programming. After a careful screening internal process, the choicest bits are chosen for inclusion in compositions using internal digital sampling and video editing in their own production facility."

(fUSION Anomaly, 12 January 2003)

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1990s1991appropriationaudiovisual mash-upsauthor as editor • Brian Kane • cable televisioncritical reinterpretationculture jammingcut-up technique • digital sampling • driving beatediting through selection • Emergency Broadcast Network (EBN) • experimental video • Gardner Post • George Bush Snr • Greg Deocampo • Gulf Warhip-hop beatsinfluential video artists • Joshua Pearson • multimedia performance group • re-editre-purposerecombinantrepurposingRhode Island School of Designsampled footagespoken-word samplingstutter effecttelevision programmingVHSvideo collagevideo remix • video scratching • video turntablist • VJ

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
13 FEBRUARY 2014

Raspberry Pi Box Lunch with Miller Puckette

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1990sAndroid OS • BSD license • collaborative production • create music together • data • developer base • FreeBSD OS • FUDI (networking protocol) • GNU • Graphics Environment for Multimedia (GEM) • GridFlow • Institut de Recherche et Coordination Acoustique Musique (IRCAM) • interactive computer music • interactivityiOS • IRIX OS • LAN • Linux • live collaboration • Mac OS X • matrix processing • Max (software)Max/MSP • Miller Puckette • multimedia works • music making technology • open source project • OpenGL • PiDiP • Pure Data (Pd) • Pure Data Packet • Raspberry Pireal-timereal-time interactivity • San Diego Supercomputer Center • software programmeterminal connectionvirtual collaborationvisual musicvisual programming languageWindows OS

CONTRIBUTOR

Mik Parsons
22 MARCH 2013

The Rise and Fall of Bitcoin

"In November 1, 2008, a man named Satoshi Nakamoto posted a research paper to an obscure cryptography listserv describing his design for a new digital currency that he called bitcoin. None of the list's veterans had heard of him, and what little information could be gleaned was murky and contradictory. In an online profile, he said he lived in Japan. His email address was from a free German service. Google searches for his name turned up no relevant information; it was clearly a pseudonym. But while Nakamoto himself may have been a puzzle, his creation cracked a problem that had stumped cryptographers for decades. The idea of digital money – convenient and untraceable, liberated from the oversight of governments and banks – had been a hot topic since the birth of the Internet. Cypherpunks, the 1990s movement of libertarian cryptographers, dedicated themselves to the project. Yet every effort to create virtual cash had foundered. Ecash, an anonymous system launched in the early 1990s by cryptographer David Chaum, failed in part because it depended on the existing infrastructures of government and credit card companies. Other proposals followed – bit gold, RPOW, b–money – but none got off the ground.

One of the core challenges of designing a digital currency involves something called the double–spending problem. If a digital dollar is just information, free from the corporeal strictures of paper and metal, what's to prevent people from copying and pasting it as easily as a chunk of text, 'spending' it as many times as they want? The conventional answer involved using a central clearinghouse to keep a real–time ledger of all transactions – ensuring that, if someone spends his last digital dollar, he can't then spend it again. The ledger prevents fraud, but it also requires a trusted third party to administer it.

Bitcoin did away with the third party by publicly distributing the ledger, what Nakamoto called the 'block chain.' Users willing to devote CPU power to running a special piece of software would be called miners and would form a network to maintain the block chain collectively. In the process, they would also generate new currency. Transactions would be broadcast to the network, and computers running the software would compete to solve irreversible cryptographic puzzles that contain data from several transactions. The first miner to solve each puzzle would be awarded 50 new bitcoins, and the associated block of transactions would be added to the chain. The difficulty of each puzzle would increase as the number of miners increased, which would keep production to one block of transactions roughly every 10 minutes. In addition, the size of each block bounty would halve every 210,000 blocks – first from 50 bitcoins to 25, then from 25 to 12.5, and so on. Around the year 2140, the currency would reach its preordained limit of 21 million bitcoins."

(Benjamin Wallace, 23 November 2011, Wired Magazine)

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1990s2008anonymous system • b-money • bit gold • bitcoin • block chain • broadcast to the network • chain • clearinghouse • collective interests • collective participation • collective participation technology • corporeal strictures • credit card • cryptographer • cryptographic puzzle • cryptography • currency • cypherpunkDavid Chaumdecentralisation • digital currency • digital dollar • digital money • distribution models • double-spending • financial flowsfinancial transactionsfraudfree market economyglobal capital flowsinformation flowsinformation theoryinfrastructureJapan • ledger • libertarianism • Listservminermining • mining metaphor • P2Ppuzzle • pyramid scheme • RPOW • Satoshi Nakamoto • speculationspeculation and innovation • spending • trustvalue and benefit • virtual cash • Wired (magazine)

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
01 NOVEMBER 2012

What is the Liverpool Care Pathway?

"The Liverpool Care Pathway (LCP) is a scheme that is intended to improve the quality of care in the final hours or days of a patient's life, and to ensure a peaceful and comfortable death. It aims to guide doctors, nurses and other health workers looking after someone who is dying on issues such as the appropriate time to remove tubes providing food and fluid, or when to stop medication.

However, its use for some has become controversial, with relatives reportedly claiming it has been used without consent, and some saying it is used inappropriately.

This criticism and the media emphasis on the supposed controversy is puzzling, as the LCP has been standard practice in most hospitals for a number of years. The LCP has also received recognition on both a national and international level as an example of good practice.

As a GP put it in the British Medical Journal, the LCP 'has transformed end of life care from an undignified, painful experience into a peaceful, dignified death at home'"

(NHS Choices, UK)

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1990s • advanced illness • British Medical Journal • care • comfortable death • consent • controversydeath • death pathway • diedignitydyingemotional needsend of life • end of life care • end-of-life careeuthanasiagood practiceGPguide • health workers • healthcare • hospice • hospital • LCP (acronym) • life • Liverpool Care Pathway • Marie Curie Palliative Care Institute • media criticism • medication • multidisciplinary approach • National Health Service • NHS • palliative care • patientpatient care • peaceful • physical needs • plan of care • prolonging life • public health • quality of care • relieve suffering • Royal Liverpool University Hospital • social needs • spiritual needs • suffering • terminally ill • UK • undignified

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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