Not Signed-In
Which clippings match 'Legislation' keyword pg.1 of 2
21 AUGUST 2013

Controversial Aotearoa New Zealand surveillance laws pass

"The controversial spy laws have been passed by Parliament by 61 votes to 59. The laws were drafted in the wake of a succession of blunders by New Zealand's foreign intelligence agency, the Government Communications Security Bureau, which included illegally spying on German internet entrepreneur Kim Dotcom. Earlier, Prime Minister John Key acknowledged new surveillance laws have 'alarmed' some people but blames the Government's opponents for stoking their fears. Legislation giving the GCSB the power to spy on New Zealanders was debated in Parliament today ahead of being passed into law."

(Tracy Watkins, 21 August 2013, Fairfax NZ News)

1

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
10 FEBRUARY 2013

Pre Certification Video

"A 'pre-cert video' (Pre-Certification) is any videotape (or laserdisc/CED) issued in the UK before the introduction of the 1984 Video Recordings Act.

Pre-cert videos were not required by law to be submitted to the BBFC so the era was unregulated, leading to many uncut releases of videos which would have fallen foul of the BBFC's strict guidelines, and would therefore have been censored if submission to the board was a legal requirement.

However, whilst many of the larger respectable companies simply issued their previously BBFC certificated cinema releases onto video to play safe as they feared there was bound to be a clampdown at some stage, some of the smaller independent companies decided to take advantage of the unregulated video rentals market by issuing 'strong uncut' versions depicting graphic violence and gore. A whole barrage of titles previously banned by the BBFC from getting a cinema release suddenly ended up uncensored on home video.

What began as a bill drafted by little known Luton Tory back bencher Graham Bright was made law after he and the tabloid press (most notably The Daily Mail) had successfully whipped the media into a frenzied hysteria over so-called 'video nasties'. Ban the Sadist Videos! was one of the more famous headlines they ran. When the bill was made law it became a legal requirement that all videotapes must be submitted to the BBFC for classification (and possible cuts).

The pre-cert video era is best remembered (amongst horror fans in particular) for the ensuing 'video nasty' debacle in which a selection of 72 videotapes were singled out and prosecuted by the DPP (Director of Public Prosecutions) under Section 2 or Section 3 of the OPA (Obscene Publications Act). Of these, 39 titles were deemed by the courts to be obscene and it's those titles which formed the final 'Video Nasties list."

1

TAGS

1984analogue mediab-moviebad tastebanned • Betamax • British Board of Film Classification (BBFC) • Capacitance Electronic Disc (CED)censorship • cinema release • collectiblesDaily Mail • DiscoVision • exploitation films • exploitation movies • film classification • gore • Graham Bright • graphic violencehome video • LaserDisc • legislationmisogyny • Music and Video (magazine) • nostalgia • Obscene Publications Act (OPA) • obscenityobsolete medium • Popular Video (magazine) • pre-cert video • pre-cert video era • pre-cert videos • pre-certification video • rare video releases • SelectaVisionsexploitation • shocksploitation • slasher • slasher film • sleaze • teensploitation • Television and Home Video (magazine) • UK • unregulated industry • VCR (N1500) • VCR (N1700) • VHS • Video 2000 • Video Business (magazine) • Video Cassette Recorder (VCR) • Video Cassette Recording • Video Compact Cassette (VCC) • video distribution • video nasties • video nasty • Video News (magazine) • Video Recordings Act • video releases • video rental • video rentals market • Video Retailer (magazine) • Video Review (magazine) • Video The Magazine • Video Today (magazine) • Video Trade Weekly (magazine) • Video Viewer (magazine) • Video Week (magazine) • Video World (magazine) • videocassette • videocassette recorder • VideoDisc • videotapes

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
20 OCTOBER 2012

Concerning Intellectual Property: a conversation with Pat Aufderheide and Ellen Seiter (part four)

"In some ways, independent media–makers seem caught in the middle of this struggle, seeking ways to protect their own creative products, but also often at the mercy of bigger corporate interests. What do we gain by looking at the issues from their perspective?"

(Henry Jenkins)

1

TAGS

best practicesbig media • codes of best practices • copyright • corporate interests • creative productsdebateDIY • Ellen Seiter • fair useHenry Jenkins • independent media makers • independent media-makers • indie mediaintellectual propertylawlegislationmonopoly • moral-panic • noncommercial creators • Pat Aufderheide • PIPApiracypolicyprotectionremixsocial consciousnessSOPA

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
14 JANUARY 2012

PROTECT IP / SOPA Act Breaks the Internet

This video "discusses the Senate version of the PROTECT IP Act, but the House bill that was introduced TODAY is much much worse.

It'll give the government new powers to block Americans' access websites that corporations don't like. The bill would criminalize posting all sorts of standard web content –– music playing in the background of videos, footage of people dancing, kids playing video games, and posting video of people playing cover songs.

This legislation will stifle free speech and innovation, and even threaten popular web services like Twitter, YouTube, and Facebook.

The bill was just introduced: We need to act now to let our lawmakers know just how terrible it is. Will you fill out the form above to ask your lawmakers to oppose the legislation?"

(Fight for the Future, 2011)

[Another naive effort by government & big media to re–conceptualise their economic models in the face of profound change.]

1

TAGS

animated presentation • bad for creativity • big media • censor the net • censors the internet • censorshipcopyright infringementcopyrighted materialcreativitydownloading laweconomic modelentertainment industryethicsFacebookfile sharingillegal behaviourintellectual propertyInternetlawlegislationold media • Online Piracy • open access • open communication • PIPA • PROTECT IP • remix culture • shuts out diverse voices • SOPA • SOPA Act • stifles innovation • Twittervideo sharingYouTube

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
04 OCTOBER 2011

Discussion Paper: a new Australian classification scheme?

"This chapter outlines factors in the media environment that necessitate reform of media classification and the development of a new National Classification Scheme. It identifies the range of trends which have been associated with media convergence, including increased access to high–speed broadband internet, digitisation, globalisation, accelerated innovation, the rise of user–created content and the changing nature of the media consumer, and the blurring of distinctions between public and private media consumption. It also draws attention to findings arising from the Convergence Review, and recent work undertaken by the Australian Communications and Media Authority (the ACMA) on 'broken concepts' in existing broadcasting and telecommunications legislation and their relevance to media classification. "

(Australian Law Reform Commission, 30 September 2011, p.45)

1). Australian Law Reform Commission (September 2011). 'National Classification Scheme Review', Discussion Paper 77

[Recommendations by Australian government agency for media policy and law reform.]

TAGS

2011 • accelerated innovation • access • ACMA • ALRC • Australia • Australian Communications and Media Authority • Australian Law Reform Commission • Australian Law Reform Commission Act • broadbandbroadcasting • broken concepts • changeconsumptionconvergencedigitisationdiscussion paper • federal agency • globalisation • Graham Meikle • high-speed broadband • ICTknowledge-based economylaw • legal reform • legislation • media classification • media consumermedia convergencemedia policymedia regulation • National Classification Scheme • old media • private media • private media consumption • reform • reform of media classification • reviewtechnological innovationtelecommunications • telecommunications legislation • trends • user-created content

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
Sign-In

Sign-In to Folksonomy

Can't access your account?

New to Folksonomy?

Sign-Up or learn more.