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Which clippings match '1987' keyword pg.2 of 2
08 JUNE 2012

David Lange: Nuclear Weapons are Morally Indefensible

"Most New Zealanders watched David Lange contest and win the 1985 Oxford Union debate, arguing the proposition that 'nuclear weapons are morally indefensible' with a mixture of pride and astonishment. After decades of knowing our place, and several years of government by homunculus, suddenly we had a Prime Minister who could stride the international stage with insouciance. And briefly, we seemed to matter.

Although New Zealand's nuclear–free policy did not become law until 1987, it was integral to early years of the fourth Labour government. The 1984 snap election that made Lange Prime Minister was called by Robert Muldoon when National MP Marilyn Waring withdrew her support for her party over the issue of nuclear ship visits. Labour won the election with a nuclear ban as a flagship policy.

The policy was popular among New Zealanders, but not without cost. Our relationship with the US deteriorated in the early weeks of 1985. On the same journey that took him to Oxford, Lange, four days before the debate, met with a US State Department official who outlined the retaliatory measures that the US would be taking against New Zealand. The ANZUS alliance of which New Zealand had been part since 1951 was effectively cancelled at that meeting."

(Public Address, 14 October 2004)

This is the introduction to the transcript of the Rt. Hon. David Lange's 1985 Oxford Debate. The transcript is copyright to Public Address. It was prepared by Russell Brown and Fiona Rae, with the consent of David Lange. Thanks are due to Radio New Zealand's Sound Archives/Nga Taonga Korero (File: Media Numbers T4705 to T4708), Infofind, the Parliamentary Library and Barry Hartley.

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TAGS

1951198419851987 • alliance • ANZUS • Aotearoa New ZealandAustralasia • Australia New Zealand United States Security Treaty • cold warcritique • David Lange • destructionethicshistory • international stage • Jerry Falwell • Labour government • Marilyn Waring • mass destructionmilitary conflictmoral purposemorality • morally indefensible • New Zealanders • Nga Taonga Korero • nuclear • nuclear weaponnuclear weapons • nuclear-free • Oxford Union • Oxford Union debate • Parliamentary Library • peacekeepingpolicypolitical policy • political reform • postcolonialPrime MinisterRadio New Zealandrepresentation • retaliatory measures • Robert Muldoon • security treaty • sound archives • televised political debatetreatyTVNZUniversity of Oxforduranium • US State Department • USAweaponweapons

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
31 JANUARY 2012

Imaging Research Center at the University of Maryland

"Since 1987 IRC researchers and students have been exploring the rapidly developing landscape of visual technology. Initial research involved high–end 3D computer animation to create rich worlds and characters. Visualizations of the otherwise invisible, ranging from biology to long–gone or unrealized architecture continue to be created at the IRC for national broadcast and current feature films.

As digital media tools became more powerful, the IRC began developing interactive, real–time virtual worlds that could respond to the decisions of an involved viewer. Researching and utilizing current game–art technologies, the IRC has created internationally recognized interactive visualizations for museums and other institutions. Additionally, pure research in real–time visualization has involved UMBC students in immersive projects that have attracted national attention.

Today, visualization capabilities have become all but limitless. At the same time, the role imagery plays in contemporary culture is of rising importance. Research at the IRC has expanded to include multidisciplinary research projects to better understand and realize an effective use of imagery to help culture process its most profound ideas. Understanding social media, online communities, and interactive collaborative virtual spaces are basic aspects of this research."

(Imaging Research Center, University of Maryland Baltimore County)

TAGS

19873D • 3D computer animation • animationapplied researchBaltimore Maryland • biology visualisation • character designcontemporary culturedesign researchdesign researcherdigital mediaexperimental knowledge • game art • game art technologies • gamesimagery • Imaging Research Center • immersion • interactive collaborative virtual spaces • interactive virtual worlds • interactive visualisations • IRCmuseumreal-time • real-time virtual worlds • real-time visualisationresearchresearch centreresearch projectresearchers • rich worlds • science visualisation • social media research • UMBC • undergraduate researchUniversity of Maryland • University of Maryland Baltimore County • virtual spacesvirtual worlds • visual technology • visualisation • visualisation capabilities • visualisations

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
08 APRIL 2011

Jean-Luc Godard: figures posing in order to be admired

"Godard is right at home here, especially following his 80s fare like Passion and First Name: Carmen. In this decade more than ever before, Godard was preoccupied with the fusing of image and sound, in the vein of Renaissance art and music. This means that he's obsessed with the human form, male and female bodies. Historically, this creates something curiously hybrid. While classical opera may have to do with bodies, Godard's style is decidedly closer to that of pre–Classical painting, with uncovered figures posing still in order to be admired or, better, worshiped. Godard's use of male bodies juxtaposing the females here fits nicely into his standard approach to bodies along with everything else: exchange of commodities. The transaction doesn't take place in the segment; the problem is an imbalance of supply with demand, a Marxist cliché that Godard is only too glad to inject into a series of films supposedly just about art and love."

(Zach 'Andrews idea', 29/08/2010)

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TAGS

1987 • Aria (1987) • Armide • art and love • body • bodybuilder • classical opera • commodityEuropean Renaissancefemale bodygender performance culturegymgymnasiumhomoeroticism • human form • ideal form • Jean-Baptiste Lully • Jean-Luc GodardjuxtapositionKarl Marx • male body • MarxismmasculinitynarcissismoperaovercodingParisphysiologyphysiqueposeposing • pre-classical • pre-classical painting • Prenom Carmen • sexualityspectaclestylisedtableautransactionvisual depiction • worship

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
24 NOVEMBER 2009

A Thousand Plateaus: Capitalism and Schizophrenia

'A Thousand Plateaus: Capitalism and Schizophrenia' by Gilles Deleuze and Félix Guattari (D&G) offers "a form that expresses the associational style of the postmodern. The 15 chapters are not designed to be read sequentially. The readers may enter where they please and jump to any chapter. Readers thus may make of their reading experience that of reading a hypertext; the authors invite that experience. (They do not forbid a start–to–end reading either.)

D&G root each chapter, however, in a concrete historical moment. Those moments are not laid out sequentially by chapter but jump around: chapter two deals with 1914, while chapter 3 deals with 10,000 BC. We note this rootedness in a study of a mode of thought, the postmodern, that indulges in the separation of reality from a simulated 'reality' which humans take to be reality. From the point of view of THE PROGRAMME, we find this connectedness significant.

What are D&G doing in this book? We think that––whatever else––they are giving us a vocabulary with which to describe and analyze the experience of being conscious in the conditions of postmodernism. Their terms are novel and difficult therefore to put together. Their novelty, we sense, is necessary if we are to come to understand what is happening to us now and what we are doing to *make* happenings. When a world view dies, the terms that define and analyze it also die, even while they continue to live on human tongues through inertia, custom, unthought. The project in this book bears witness that the two authors feel the death of the pre–postmodern world view; their ambition is to give us the equipment to begin to know what has been happening. In one sense, it has not been happening until we use the equipment to say what has been happening: such a sense would be consistent with a major postmodern thread."

(Dick Richter, http://webpages.ursinus.edu/rrichter/deleuzeandg.html)

Deleuze, G. and F. Guattari (2002). A Thousand Plateaus: Capitalism and Schizophrenia. London, Continuum.

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
15 MAY 2009

The Australian Technology Network (new universities, Post-1992 universities, land-grant colleges)

"The Australian Technology Network (ATN) comprises Curtin University of Technology, University of South Australia, RMIT University, University of Technology, Sydney and Queensland University of Technology. All were established as universities between 1987 and 1992. This group of universities has a common technology heritage, a common research focus on solving real world problems (73 per cent of all research income sourced from industry), and a willingness to learn from each other at all levels. The members of the group have worked together for more than 20 years."
(Department of Education, Science and Training, Commonwealth of Australia)

[The Australian Technology Network Universities in Australia are equivalent to the new universities (mainly ex–polytechnics and technical colleges) in Aotearoa/New Zealand, Hong Kong and Singapore, and Post–1992 or 'Plate Glass' universities in the United Kingdom and land–grant colleges in North America.]

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TAGS

19871992Aotearoa New Zealand • ATN • Australia • Australian Technology Network • Curtin University of Technology • Hong Kong • institute of technology • land-grant colleges • new universitiesnew universitypolytechnic • post-1992 • Post-1992 universities • Queensland University of TechnologyQUTRMITRMIT Universitysandstone universitiesSingaporetechnical collegetechnologyUK • UniSA • university • University of South Australia • University of Technology Sydney • UTS

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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