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Which clippings match '1987' keyword pg.1 of 2
28 JUNE 2014

Mike Leigh: The Short And Curlies (1987)

"'The Short & Curlies' is a short film written and directed by Mike Leigh. It stars Alison Steadman, Wendy Nottingham, Sylvestra Le Touzel and David Thewlis. The short, 18 minute film, made after three weeks rehearsal, concerns a chatty hairdresser Betty (Alsion Steadman), her shy daughter, Charlene (Wendy Nottingham), and one of her customers, Joy (Sylvestra Le Touzel). Joy works in a chemist's shop and is chatted up by Clive (David Thewlis – in the first of his three Leigh roles). Romance ensues in a Thatcherite England, a great little watch for a sunny afternoon."

(Calum Sager, 10 April 2013, Spilt Milk)

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TAGS

1987 • Alison Steadman • awkwardness • bad pun • believable charactersChannel 4 • chemist • David Thewlis • deadpan expression • domestic drama • geeky guy • hairdresser • Harlesden • joking • Jon Gregory • Mike Leighone-linerpharmacy • Portman Productions • Rachel Portman • Roger Pratt • romantic comedy • Short and Curlies (1988) • short film • Simon Channing Williams • sincerity • Sylvestra Le Touzel • UK • Victor Glynn • Wendy Nottingham • Willesden

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
18 NOVEMBER 2012

The Fallen Easel: an evocative and visually stylish provisionality

"John Baldessari's 1987 work titled The Fallen Easel is made up of nine framed panels containing fragmentary images that seem to add up as a complex non sequitur. The lone diagonal panel shows a grayscale screen print of an easel laying on the ground, while other panels show faces and hands that are sometimes obscured by ovals of bright flat colors. Clearly, we see a rebus of sorts, but its substitution of picture–fragments for a syllogistic circuit remains just outside of the grasp of routine readability. Mentally reassembling them does not help, and the narrative context that would enable the work to be analyzed in the manner of a dream is missing. We can only conclude that the relationship between the work's diverse elements is one of an evocative and visually stylish provisionality, but we remain haunted by it, for it keeps us coming back in search of the key that will unlock its beguiling mystery of allegorical displacements and substitutions. Yes, this is an update of a kind of surrealism, but there is something else going on here as well, something pertaining to the typical psychological distance created by mass media imagery striped of its pretense of narrative coherence. All at once, the linked histories of Surrealism, Pop Art, Conceptual Art and Postmodernism flash before our eyes. We are not in Kansas anymore, but is unclear exactly where we are or where anything else is for that matter."

(Mark Van Proyen, November 2009, art ltd. magazine)

Fig.1 John Baldessari (1987). "The Fallen Easel" colour lithograph and screenprint in five parts printed on paper and aluminium plates. Collection of Jordan D. Schnitzer. Photo: courtesy of Legion of Honor Museum.

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TAGS

1987allegorical displacements • allegorical substitutions • allegory • beguiling mystery • colour lithograph • complex non sequitur • composition • compositional practice • conceptual art • diverse elements • easel • flat colourfragmentary • fragmentary images • framed panels • John Baldessari • Legion of Honor Museum • linked histories • mass media • narrative coherence • narrative context • non sequitur • not in Kansas anymore • obscured view • oval • picture fragmentspop artpostmodernism • pretense • print retrospective • provisional • provisionality • psychological distance • readability • rebus • routine readability • screenprintsurrealism • syllogism • syllogistic circuit • The Fallen Easel • unlock • visually stylish provisionality

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
08 NOVEMBER 2012

Max Headroom: an anarchic and irreverent cybernetic protagonist

"Max Headroom was one of the most innovative science fiction series ever produced for American television, an ambitious attempt to build upon the cyberpunk movement in science fiction literature. The character of Max Headroom, the series's unlikely cybernetic protagonist, was originally introduced in a 1984 British television movie, produced by Peter Wagg, and starring Canadian actor Matt Frewer. ABC brought the series to American television in March 1987, refilming the original movie as a pilot but recasting most of the secondary roles. The ABC series attracted critical acclaim and a cult following, but only lasted for fourteen episodes. The anarchic and irreverent Max went on to become an advertising spokesman for Coca–Cola and to host his own talk show on the Cinemax cable network."

(The Museum of Broadcast Communications)

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1980s198780s television • American television • anarchicBlade Runner (1982)Bruce SterlingCoca-Colacomputer animation • cult following • cyberneticcyberpunk • cyberpunk movement • cyberspace • irreverent • Matt Frewer • Max Headroom • Museum of Broadcast CommunicationsNeuromancer • Pat Cadigan • Peter Wagg • Rudy Ruckerscience fiction literaturescience fiction television series • telefilm • televisiontelevision series • The Road Warrior • TVWilliam Gibson

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
07 JULY 2012

Neoliberal whizz-kid: Aotearoa New Zealand PM John Key in 1987

"A 1987 video has been unearthed featuring a 25–year–old squash–playing, accountancy graduate John Key. The bright–eyed Mr Key features in an early Close–Up story called Big Dealers. The 'portrait of 80s job du jour: foreign exchange dealer', shows the now Prime Minister in 'the pit' (trading room) as a senior forex dealer. 'Forex dealing is a work hard, play hard world with an image of rich brats who wreck restaurants but always somewhere else,' says the reporter. 'I am not denying that, that has happened and I guess that will happen again in the future but I personally perform in that way,' Mr Key responded."

(Deanna Harris, 02 Sep 2010, MediaWorks TV)

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1980s1987 • 3 News • accountancy graduate • Aotearoa New Zealand • Big Dealers (television) • bright-eyed • businesscapital accumulationcapitalismChristchurch • Close-Up (television) • economyfinance • finance industry • financial dealingfinancial flowsfinancial gainfinancial innovationfinancial markets • financial risk • financial transactionsfinancing • foreign exchange • foreign exchange dealer • foreign exchange dealers • forex dealer • forex dealing • free market economyglobal capital flowsglobal financial marketJohn Keylifestyle • MediaWorks TV • money making • neoliberalismNew Zealand on Screen • NZ News • personal financial gain • Prime Ministerprofitrich bratriskrisk-takingsocial conservatism • squash-playing • stock marketstocks • trading room • TV3unit of capital accumulation • whizz-kid • winning • young upwardly-mobile professional • young urban professional • yuppie

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
08 JUNE 2012

David Lange: Nuclear Weapons are Morally Indefensible

"Most New Zealanders watched David Lange contest and win the 1985 Oxford Union debate, arguing the proposition that 'nuclear weapons are morally indefensible' with a mixture of pride and astonishment. After decades of knowing our place, and several years of government by homunculus, suddenly we had a Prime Minister who could stride the international stage with insouciance. And briefly, we seemed to matter.

Although New Zealand's nuclear–free policy did not become law until 1987, it was integral to early years of the fourth Labour government. The 1984 snap election that made Lange Prime Minister was called by Robert Muldoon when National MP Marilyn Waring withdrew her support for her party over the issue of nuclear ship visits. Labour won the election with a nuclear ban as a flagship policy.

The policy was popular among New Zealanders, but not without cost. Our relationship with the US deteriorated in the early weeks of 1985. On the same journey that took him to Oxford, Lange, four days before the debate, met with a US State Department official who outlined the retaliatory measures that the US would be taking against New Zealand. The ANZUS alliance of which New Zealand had been part since 1951 was effectively cancelled at that meeting."

(Public Address, 14 October 2004)

This is the introduction to the transcript of the Rt. Hon. David Lange's 1985 Oxford Debate. The transcript is copyright to Public Address. It was prepared by Russell Brown and Fiona Rae, with the consent of David Lange. Thanks are due to Radio New Zealand's Sound Archives/Nga Taonga Korero (File: Media Numbers T4705 to T4708), Infofind, the Parliamentary Library and Barry Hartley.

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TAGS

1951198419851987 • alliance • ANZUS • Aotearoa New ZealandAustralasia • Australia New Zealand United States Security Treaty • cold warcritique • David Lange • destructionethicshistory • international stage • Jerry Falwell • Labour government • Marilyn Waring • mass destructionmilitary conflictmoral purposemorality • morally indefensible • New Zealanders • Nga Taonga Korero • nuclear • nuclear weaponnuclear weapons • nuclear-free • Oxford Union • Oxford Union debate • Parliamentary Library • peacekeepingpolicypolitical policy • political reform • postcolonialPrime MinisterRadio New Zealandrepresentation • retaliatory measures • Robert Muldoon • security treaty • sound archives • televised political debatetreatyTVNZUniversity of Oxforduranium • US State Department • USAweaponweapons

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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