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Which clippings match 'Linux' keyword pg.1 of 3
03 JULY 2015

SuperCollider: real-time audio synthesis and algorithmic composition

"The language interpreter runs in a cross platform IDE (OS X/Linux/Windows) and communicates via Open Sound Control with one or more synthesis servers. The SuperCollider synthesis server runs in a separate process or even on a separate machine so it is ideal for realtime networked music.

SuperCollider was developed by James McCartney and originally released in 1996. He released it under the terms of the GNU General Public License in 2002 when he joined the Apple Core Audio team. It is now maintained and developed by an active and enthusiastic community. It is used by musicians, scientists, and artists working with sound."

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TAGS

1996 • acoustic research • algorithmic composition • algorithmic music • Apple Core Audio • authoring environmentcomputational designdevelopment environment • Devi Skanadze • electronic musicexperimental music • generative audio • generative musicGNU General Public LicenseIDE • interactive programming • James McCartney • language interpreter • LinuxOpen Sound ControlOSXprogramming environmentprogramming language • real-time audio synthesis • real-time generative music • real-time interaction • realtime networked music • rule-based worksonic arts • SuperCollider • synthesis server • Windows OS

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
13 FEBRUARY 2014

Raspberry Pi Box Lunch with Miller Puckette

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1990sAndroid OS • BSD license • collaborative production • create music together • data • developer base • FreeBSD OS • FUDI (networking protocol) • GNU • Graphics Environment for Multimedia (GEM) • GridFlow • Institut de Recherche et Coordination Acoustique Musique (IRCAM) • interactive computer music • interactivityiOS • IRIX OS • LAN • Linux • live collaboration • Mac OS X • matrix processing • Max (software)Max/MSP • Miller Puckette • multimedia works • music making technology • open source project • OpenGL • PiDiP • Pure Data (Pd) • Pure Data Packet • Raspberry Pireal-timereal-time interactivity • San Diego Supercomputer Center • software programmeterminal connectionvirtual collaborationvisual musicvisual programming languageWindows OS

CONTRIBUTOR

Mik Parsons
22 APRIL 2012

Cooperation and collaboration: problem solving and problem finding

"The economists Richard Lester and Michael Piore have studied the firms that sought to create the switching technology, finding that cooperation and collaboration within certain companies allowed them to make headway on the switching technology problem, whereas internal competition at other corporations diminished engineers' efforts to improve the quality of the switches. Motorola, a success story, developed what it called a 'technology shelf,' created by a small group of engineers, on which were placed possible technical solutions that other teams might use in the future; rather than trying to solve the problem outright, it developed tools whose immediate value was not clear. Nokia grappled with the problem in another collaborative way, creating an open–ended conversation among its engineers in which salespeople and designers were often included. The boundaries among business units in Nokia were deliberately ambiguous, because more than technical information was needed to get a feeling for the problem; lateral thinking was required. Lester and Piore describe the process of communication this entailed as 'fluid, context–dependent, undetermined.'[20]

By contrast, companies like Ericsson proceeded with more seeming clarity and discipline, dividing the problem into its parts. The birth of the new switch was intended to occur through 'the exchange of information' among offices 'rather than the cultivation of an interpretative community.'[21] Rigidly organized, Ericsson fell away. It did eventually solve the switching technology problem, but with greater difficulty; different offices protected their turf. In any organization, individuals or teams that compete and are rewarded for doing better than others will hoard information. In technology firms, hoarding information particularly disables good work.

The corporations that succeeded through cooperation shared with the Linux community that experimental mark of technological craftsmanship, the intimate, fluid join between problem solving and problem finding. Within the framework of competition, by contrast, clear standards of achievement and closure are needed to measure performance and to dole out rewards.

[20] Richard K. Lester and Michael J. Piore, Innovation, the Missing Dimension (Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 2004), 98.

[21] Ibid., 104."

(Richard Sennett, 2008, pp.32–33)

1). Sennett, R. (2008). "The Craftsman". New Haven & London, Yale University Press.

TAGS

2008boundaries • business units • clarity and discipline • closurecollaborationcommunicationcommunication processcompetitioncompetitive teams • context-dependent communication • cooperationcooperation and collaborationcorporationscraftsmanship • deliberately ambiguous • designers • dividing problems into parts • dole out rewards • engagementengineers • fluid communication • framework of competition • hoarding information • information exchangeinformation in context • internal competition • interpretative community • lateral thinkingLinux • Linux community • measure performance • Michael Piore • MotorolaNokia • open-ended conversation • participationperformanceperformativityproblem findingproblem solving and problem findingproblem-solvingreward • Richard Lester • Richard SennettsalespeopleshareSony Ericssonstandards of achievementsuccess • switching technology • technical information • technical solutions • technological craftsmanship • technology shelf • The Craftsman • undetermined communication • working methods

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
15 APRIL 2012

Beta blockers? : proprietary data formats may be legally defensible but open standards can be a better spur for innovation

"Thomson [Thomson Reuters] makes the proprietary bibliography software EndNote, and claims that Zotero is causing its commercial business 'irreparable harm' and is wilfully and intentionally destroying Thomson's customer base. In particular, Thomson is demanding that GMU stop distributing the newer beta–version of Zotero that allegedly allows EndNote's proprietary data format for storing journal citation styles to be converted into an open–standard format readable by Zotero and other software. Thomson claims that Zotero 'reverse engineered or decompiled' not only the format, but also the EndNote software itself. ...

Litigation, which may go to a jury trial, is pending, so judging this case on its legal merits would be premature. But on a more general level, the virtues of interoperability and easy data–sharing among researchers are worth restating. Imagine if Microsoft Word or Excel files could be opened and saved only in these proprietary formats, for example. It would be impossible for OpenOffice and other such software to read and save these files using open standards – as they can legally do.

Competition between open–source and proprietary software is long–running, as personified by the struggle between Windows and Linux for desktop and server operating systems, but also in many branches of software used by scientists. Researchers tend to lean towards open sharing, but they will also pay for added–value features, and it's important that the playing field is level. Ultimately, the customer is king."

(Nature, p.708)

Nature Volume 455, p.708 (9 October 2008) | doi:10.1038/455708a; Published online 8 October 2008, Nature Publishing Group, a division of Macmillan Publishers Limited.

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2006 • added-value features • authorshipbibliography softwareCenter for History and New MediacitationcopyrightDan Cohen • data format • digital informationEndNoteGeorge Mason Universityinteroperabilityknowledge integrationlawsuitlevel playing fieldLinuxMicrosoft ExcelMicrosoft WindowsMicrosoft WordNature (journal) • open sharing • open sourceopen source filesopen source software • open standard format • open standards • OpenOffice • operating systemorganise and share • OS • ownershipproprietary • proprietary data formats • proprietary formats • proprietary software • researchersreverse engineering • science news • science policy • Sean Takatssoftwaretechnology • Thomson Reuters • trademark infringment • Zotero

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
11 MARCH 2012

Joshua Nimoy: representing digital culture in film

"I take representing digital culture in film very seriously in lieu of having grown up in a world of very badly researched user interface greeble. I cringed during the part in Hackers (1995) when a screen saver with extruded 'equations' is used to signify that the hacker has reached some sort of neural flow or ambiguous destination. I cringed for Swordfish and Jurassic Park as well. I cheered when Trinity in The Matrix used nmap and ssh (and so did you). Then I cringed again when I saw that inevitably, Hollywood had decided that nmap was the thing to use for all its hacker scenes (see Bourne Ultimatum, Die Hard 4, Girl with Dragon Tattoo, The Listening, 13: Game of Death, Battle Royale, Broken Saints, and on and on). In Tron, the hacker was not supposed to be snooping around on a network; he was supposed to kill a process. So we went with posix kill and also had him pipe ps into grep. I also ended up using emacs eshell to make the terminal more l33t. The team was delighted to see my emacs performance –– splitting the editor into nested panes and running different modes. I was tickled that I got emacs into a block buster movie. I actually do use emacs irl, and although I do not subscribe to alt.religion.emacs, I think that's all incredibly relevant to the world of Tron."

(Joshua T. Nimoy)

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13: Game of Death • Adobe • alt.religion.emacs • Andy King • art of code • Battle Royale • blockbuster • Bourne Ultimatum • Bradley Munkowitz • Broken Saints • C++CG • CG artist • Cinema 4D • code • Consumer eXperience Design • CXD • David Lewandowski • Die Hard 4 • digital culture • Digital Domain • Emacs • emacs eshell • emacs irl • Eshell • film • Girl with Dragon Tattoo • GREPhacker • Hackers (film) • Hollywood • Houdini (software) • Jake Sargeant • Jurassic Park (film) • l33t • Linux • Media and Visual Designer • network • nmap • OpenFrameworksOpenGL • pipe ps • POSIX • posix kill • Processing (software) • screen saver • software artspecial effects • SSH • Swordfish (film) • terminal • The Listening • The Matrix (1999)Tron • TRON: Legacy • user interfaceVFX • wxWidgets

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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