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Which clippings match 'Saudi Arabia' keyword pg.1 of 1
30 JANUARY 2015

Bitter Lake by Adam Curtis: how the West fooled itself

"My aim is to try to get people to look at those fragments of recorded moments from Afghanistan in a new and fresh way. I do feel that the way many factual programmes on TV are edited and constructed has become so rigid and formulaic – that the audiences don't really look at them any more. The template is so familiar.

I am using these techniques to both amplify and express the wider argument of Bitter Lake. It is that those in power in our society have so simplified the stories they tell themselves, and us, about the world that they have in effect lost touch with reality. That they have reduced the world to an almost childlike vision of a battle between good and evil.

This was the story that those who invaded Afghanistan carried with them and tried to impose there – and as a result they really could not see what was staring them in the face: a complex society where different groups had been involved in a bloody civil war for over 30 years. A world where no one was simply good or bad. But those in charge ignored all that – and out of it came a military and political disaster.

But the film also tries to show why Western politicians have so simplified the world. Because Afghanistan's recent past is also a key that unlocks an epic hidden history of the postwar world."

(Adam Curtis, 24 January 2015, The Telegraph)

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TAGS

1945 • 1970s America • 1973Adam CurtisAfghanistanArab • BBC iPlayer-only • Bedouin • Bitter Lake (2015) • bitter rivalries • caliphate • Come Down To Us (Burial 2013) • complex problems • deal • destabilised politics • documentarydocumentary film • dreamlike documentary style • drone • epic moment • footageFranklin D. Roosevelt • generations to come • global capitalismglobal politics • good versus evil • grand hypothesis • grand political dream • Helmand • ideology • imagined past • Islamic fundamentalism • Islamism • Kabul • King Ibn Saud of Saudi Arabia • Malcolm Tucker • Margaret ThatcherMiddle Eastmilitary intervention • Pashtun • Perry Mason • Phil Goodwin • Pushtun • recorded moments • Ronald ReaganSaudi Arabia • simplified stories • Solaris (1972) • Suez Canal • Wahhabi Islam • Wahhabism

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
06 MARCH 2011

H2Oil: dramatic animated expository sequences

"Alberta sits over one of the largest recoverable oil patches in the world, second only to Saudi Arabia. It covers 149, 000 square kilometers, an area larger than Florida, and holds at least 175 billion barrels of recoverable crude bitumen. Canada has become the largest supplier of oil to the U.S., with over a million barrels per day coming from the oil sands. Currently 40% of all oil produced in Canada is derived from the oil sands.

The crude oil produced from the oil sands, the dirtiest oil in the world, could keep the global appetite for oil at bay for another 50 years.

But oil sands are a fundamentally different kind of oil. They take a lot of energy and a lot of water and leave a very large environmental footprint compared to all other forms of oil extraction. Because of this, the massive changes to the boreal forest and the watershed have prompted the United Nations to list this region as a global hot spot for environmental change.

In addition, oil sands projects are major emitters of greenhouse gases. They accounted for 4% of Canada's greenhouse gas emissions in 2005, making it impossible to meet obligations set out in Kyoto for emissions–reductions."

(H2Oil)

Fig.1 Dale Hayward & Sylvie Trouvé, James Braithwaite, Daniel Legace. 'La Moustache'.

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20092D2D animationAfter Effects • Alberta • animated presentationanimation • bitumen • Boreal Forest • Canadaconsumptioncrude oil • Dale Hayward • Daniel Legace • documentaryenvironmentenvironmental change • environmental footprint • ethicsexpositionFloridagreenhouse gas emissionsgreenhouse gases • H2Oil • illustrationJames Braithwaite • Kyoto • La Moustache • motion designmotion graphicsnatureobsolescenceoiloil extraction • oil sands • overburden • Saudi Arabiasequence design • Shannon Walsh • sustainabilityUnited Nationsvisual essaywastewater

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
07 MAY 2009

Luthan Hotel: a woman's world in Arabia

"From the outside, the Luthan Hotel and Spa in Riyadh's diplomatic quarter looks just like any other modern hotel.

But step inside the discreet, frosted–glass building and you enter a women's world which men are forbidden to enter.

The Luthan is the Middle East's first women–only hotel, and as well as catering just for female guests, all the staff are women too."
(Stephanie Hancock, 4 March 2009, BBC News)

[The Luthan Hotel operates as a heterotopia (Michel Foucault). The hotel does so through enabling a discordant relation to exist between the specific societal ordering of the hotel and broader Saudi Arabia society. In doing so the hotel can be seen as a case of societal ordering reminiscent of the pre French Revolution Palais Royal (Kevin Hetherington).]

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
08 NOVEMBER 2008

Snickers Don't Stop ad campaign: traffic light men rise up

"The ad was shot in Saudi Arabia, all the post was done in Amsterdam and the music is by a hip hop band out of Kuwait."

Client: Snickers; Agency: BBDO/Impact Dubai; Creatives: Jennie Morris, Sian Binder; Production Company: X Ray Films; Director: Joeri Holsheimer.

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2007ad campaignAmsterdamanimation • Army of One (band) • Azza Aboual Magd • BBDO • BBDO Dubai • chase scenecrosswalkduelfightfight backfight sequencegreen • Hans Loosmann • high concepthigh concept filmhip-hop • Impact BBDO Dubai • Jennie Morris • Joeri Holshheimer • Kuwait • Lets Roll (song) • lights • little green man • little red man • Masterfoods Middle East • Middle East • Niels Scheide • Peter Russellreanimatingred • Rolf Van Slooten • Saudi Arabia • Sian Binder • Snickers • Soeren Schmidt • street sign • Tarek Abdallah • traffic lightUnited Arab Emirates • Valkieser Capital Images • X Ray Films

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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