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Which clippings match 'Delicious' keyword pg.1 of 2
08 JANUARY 2013

Del.icio.us tag bundles in 2005

Del.icio.us tag bundles "are basically just title headings to help organise your tags ... so it's an alternative to an alphabetical list ... also tags can be kept under multiple headings.

A good future development would be to make these bundle headings tags themselves (also with an RSS feed) ... this way we could subscibe to topic tags or bundle tags as they would be called.

So at the moment tag bundles are for personally organising your tags into groups ... good also to view other people's accounts as their is now some context."

(John Tropea, 13 May 2005, Library clips)

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TAGS

2005 • alphabetical list alternative • association • bundle tags • concept filter • conceptual context • content grouping • Deliciousgroupingintegration • organise your tags • organising your tags • primary node • secondary node • subscibe to topic tags • tag bundle • tag bundle headings tags • tag bundles • tags • title headings

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
05 AUGUST 2012

Teach and Learn Online: Die LMS die! You too PLE!

"The PLE project recognises the fundamental flaws in Virtual Learning Environments or Learning Management Systems (VLE, LMS), but falls short in its vision of an alternative. At this stage in the project it is suggesting that the PLE be a desktop application for a student (sounds a bit like my old Perfect LMS idea) or a singular portal online.

At risk of sounding like a broken record, I'll have to repeat my defining question about Internet enhanced learning, but this time in response to the PLE.

Question to the PLE: Why do we need a PLE when we already have the Internet? The Internet is my PLE, ePortfolio, VLE what ever. Thanks to blogger, bloglines, flickr, delicious, wikispaces, ourmedia, creative commons, and what ever comes next in this new Internet age, I have a strong online ID and very extensive and personalised learning environment. Actually I think the PLE idea is better envisioned by the futurist concept known as the Evolving Personalised Information Construct (EPIC). I think we already have EPIC, so why do we need the PLE?

To extend the statement: We insignificant little teachers and our out of date schools and classrooms don't need to be investing in media projects like VLEs, LMS and even PLEs. Our dam walls of knowledge have burst! and no amount of sand bagging will stop the flood that is clearly discrediting our authority over learning. Media, and with it communications, will evolve (as it certainly has in the last 50 years or more) well beyond the limitations of our classrooms, with investments and broadcast influence we can't even fathom. Why waste our precious money and time on projects that only serve to suspend our true position within that media scape. The PLE makes me think of ELGG, and it all makes me wonder why it is we educationalists still think we are even relevant anymore. The people (yes that includes us) are learning how to read and write for themselves, and in an amazing act of collective generosity, the people are teaching each other – why do they even need our classrooms... is it perhaps only credentialism that we offer? Or is it also sense of security and safety? Is it false?"

(Leigh Blackall, 13 November 2005)

Fig.1 "Lords of Graphite" by 5star (Neil Caldwell).

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TAGS

2005authorised voiceBlogger (software) • Bloglines • broadcast societycentralised platformclassrooms • collective generosity • Creative CommonscredentialismDeliciousdesktop application • desktop classroom • e-portfolio • educationalists • ELGG • EPIC (acronym) • ePortfolio • Evolving Personalised Information Construct • Flickrgift cultureinformation literacy • internet enhanced learning • learning and teaching • learning centre • Learning Management System • learning media • learning platform • learning portal • Leigh Blackall • LMSmedia literacymediascape • network literate • new Internet age • online portal • open Internet • Ourmedia • out of date • personalised learning environment • pervasive mediaPLEschools • singular portal online • virtual learning environmentsVLEWikispaces

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
17 APRIL 2011

Folksonomies: improving tagging technique

"Here are some of the techniques used by professionals:

Universe – knowing the complete vocabulary, so you know what categories are available

Synonyms – that one of the meanins of ultrasound is the same as sonography.

Hierarchy – a Volvo is a kind of car, is a kind of transportation device.

So here are some ideas for how we could improve folksonomy software to make us better at this, without involving any editors.

Suggest tags for me. A Google Suggest–style interface will help familiarize people with the universe of existing tags, so you can use an existing tag rather than invent your own, when the existing tag applies equally well. It would also reduce typos and inconsistencies, like 'blog' vs. 'blogs', and it might serve as inspiration to get past the obvious tags. The pool of tags suggested from could be a weighted list of my own tags, my friends' tags, all tags, and tags other people have already used for this link.

Find synonyms automatically. In the browsing interface, Flickr is pretty good about showing related tags. Why not show these related tags when I am tagging a photo, thus making it easy for me to just add the ones that apply. They could even do a quick lookup on WordNet for more synonyms. Since the related tags in the browsing interface feeds off of tags used on the same images on the input side, this would also help make strong links stronger.

Help me know what tags other people use. When doing both the Google Suggest and the synonyms above, show the most used tags in a larger size than less used tags. There is value in people using the same tag for the same thing, and we want to encourage that, without in any way preventing people from choosing different tag if they want to.

Infer hiearchy from the tags. I have a habit of using multiword tags, so instead of saying 'socialsoftware' like you're supposed to on delicious, I say 'social software', which really makes it two separate tags. That's not necessarily a bad thing, though. If this habit is generally applied, we could look at home many links that are tagged with 'social' are also tagged 'software', and maybe infer that 'social' is frequently used in conjunction with 'software', and thus might imply a special kind of software (or the other way around, that software is a special kind of social), thus offering the combined tag 'social software' to contain links that are tagged with both. A different example would be items tagged 'volvo car'. If most of the time something is tagged 'volvo', it is also tagged 'car', we might infer that volvo is a kind of car.

Make it easy to adjust tags on old content. If the above and other ideas work, people's tagging skills should improve over time. So why not augment the browsing interface so that it's very easy for me to add or remove tags from my iamges or links right there, e.g. from a list of suggested tags on the page, and I'm sure that sometimes, someone would use it. Another incentive to retag my content is if I'm searching for a link on Buenos Aires, but the link wasn't tagged with 'buenosaires', so I find it under 'argentina', say, it should be very easy to add the 'buenosaires' tag to that item."

(Lars Pind, 23 January 2005)

TAGS

road folksonomies • browsing interfacecategory • conjunction • contentDeliciousFlickrfolksonomy • folksonomy software • Google Suggesthabithierarchyinconsistencies • infer hiearchy • information retrieval • interpersonal information retrieval • intersubjective meaning • link strength • lookup • multiword tags • prompting • related tags • retag • searching • social softwaresoftware • synonym • tag quality • tag suggestion • tagging skills • tags • tags other people • typos • valid tags • vocabulary • WordNet

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
27 DECEMBER 2010

dis-integrating the LMS: using best-of-breed tools

"Teachers and learners should be encouraged and supported in their efforts to find and use the most appropriate and effective best–of–breed tools outside the LMS. For example, they can post slide presentations on SlideShare, create group collaboration sites on Google, stream and archive lectures on UStream, and build shared resource collections with Delicious. Such tools can be aggregated via course blogs, wikis, or mashup sites like Netvibes.

Some institutions have made significant, pioneering efforts to bridge the gap between the institutional network and the web by integrating Web 2.0 tools with administrative systems. For example, three years ago the University of Mary Washington deployed an instance of WordPress MultiUser (WPMU) as an alternative teaching and learning platform (UMW Blogs). UMW's blog platform blends the LMS and PLN paradigms by integrating their WPMU instance with the university directory, enabling the creation of blogs that automatically enroll students in courses as 'members' of class blogs created by instructors."

(Jonathan Mott, 2010)

Mott, J. (2010). 'Envisioning the Post–LMS Era: The Open Learning Network.' Educause Quarterly 33(1).

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TAGS

administrative systems • aggregationarchive • best-of-breed • blog • blog platform • co-learnercollaborationComputer Supported Collaborative LearningconnectionsCSCLDeliciouse-learning 2.0e-learning applicationEducause QuarterlyexperimentationGoogle Incinformationinnovationinstitutional networkintegrationJonathan Mottlearnerlearninglearning and teachingLMSmash-upNetvibespioneeringPLN • resource collections • shareSlideShare • stream • teachertoolsUMWUMW Blogs • university directory • University of Mary Washington • UStream • Web 2.0wiki • WordPress MultiUser • WPMU

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
13 JULY 2009

The World Wide Web is a hypermedia application

"The World Wide Web is a hypermedia application, not just a collection of specifications. Again, our software development training doesn't help us here very much. Good ol' functional decomposition makes us (well, me at least) want to see the Web as HTTP (RFC 2616), URIs (RFC 3986), MIME types (Wikipedia entry to set of related RFCs), HTML/XHTML (W3C markup specifications) and HTML forms (W3C recommendation and RFC 2388).

In actual fact, it's all of those working together to provide, as Eric [Newcomer] said, the Web as a distributed hypermedia application (which, if I remember correctly is a point also made by Roy Fielding himself in the dissertation). The Web works because both user agents (browsers) and the server applications use all of these specifications together to expose a set of functionality to the interactive user. There is no a priori agreement between the browser and the Web server as to how the information service built on these specifications used, but because of agreement on how these specifications are used together, as an application, it doesn't matter if today, CNN.com is built using Microsoft ASP, and tomorrow it's built on PHP. Apart from the application of the 'Cool URIs Don't Change' principle, if a user starts from , they will always be able to utilize the CNN news service via their browser's implementation of those specifications and the implicit agreement of CNN to publish its service in accordance with them too.
...
A hypermedia application such as Atom or RSS and content negotiation via MIME types, HTTP accept headers and embedded tags mean that this sort of evolution could happen without breaking the client–provided there is agreement on the application semantics of how those things should be both used and interpreted between clients and servers. Anything else means you're back to brittle, API based systems that can no longer evolve independently of each other."
(Andrew Townley, 16th December 2006)

[Andrew Townley attempts to re–emphasise the significance of the Internet as a hypermedia system. He does so as a criticism of what be believes is the conventional logic of programming which by extension is preoccupied with the development of APIs. So despite the immediate value of the REST API for enabling interaction with services by sites such as Delicious.com such efforts only conceal the real value of the Internet as a generalised, flexible and interoperable system.]

TAGS

APIapplicationarchitectureatomDeliciousdistributed hypermedia applicationhypermedia • hypermedia application • ICTinnovationinteractive mediaInternetinteroperability • MIME type • negotiationREST APIRoy FieldingRSSservicetechnologyweb

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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