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Which clippings match 'Demonstration' keyword pg.1 of 1
26 MARCH 2012

Crash test: the 2009 Chevrolet Malibu vs. the 1959 Chevrolet Bel Air

"In the 50 years since US insurers organized the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety, car crashworthiness has improved. Demonstrating this was a crash test conducted on Sept. 9 between a 1959 Chevrolet Bel Air and a 2009 Chevrolet Malibu. In a real–world collision similar to this test, occupants of the new model would fare much better than in the vintage Chevy.

'It was night and day, the difference in occupant protection,' says Institute president Adrian Lund. 'What this test shows is that automakers don't build cars like they used to. They build them better.'"

(Insurance Institute for Highway Safety, 9 September 2009)

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TAGS

1959200950th anniversaryanniversaryautomaker • build them better • carcar crash • cars • Chevrolet • Chevrolet Bel Air • Chevrolet MalibuChevycollisioncrashcrash testcrashworthinessdebunkingdemonstrationdesign • dramatic demonstration • engineering • GEP • good engineering practice • high-speed camerahighway safetyhistorical revisionism • IIHS • insurance • insurance company • Insurance Institute for Highway Safety • protectionreal-worldroad safetyrobustnesssafetysafety by designslow motionslow motion photographytestUSAvintage

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
24 FEBRUARY 2010

Iranian popular theatrical forms through the lens of Mikhail Bakhtin's concept of carnival

"[Mikhail] Bakhtin's concept of carnival as a subversive, disruptive world–upside–down event in which the repressive views, lies, and hypocrisy of the officially run and dominated everyday world are unmasked provides a powerful theoretical concept for any study of Iranian popular theatrical and related musical forms. Bakhtin was concerned with polyvocality and the fact that from the onset of the European Renaissance the voices of the common people were increasingly not heard. The Islamic Republic's ban on the performance of improvisational comic theater would seem to support this theoretical stance with empirical evidence of official reaction. In the European context analyzed by Bakhtin, a writer, exemplified by Rabelais, enacts an important role because he or she reflects the voices of the low, the peasant, the outcast. In Bakhtin's view, the healthy voice of the low, which questions the high–the church and the state–is an important check on oppressive officials in a healthy society.

A full–fledged carnival–such as those in Rio de Janeiro and New Orleans–does not exist in the Iranian culture sphere. By carnival I mean a massive demonstration of excessive eating, drinking, and sexual and bodily exposure, popularly associated with Carnival in Rio de Janeiro, that does not occur within an Islamic/Iranian context. Threads and themes of carnivalesque and grotesque subversion, however, can be found woven through the fabric of the Iranian world. Here the needle that pricks the official religious, social, and political powers most is the traditional comic theater in its many guises.

In many ways siyah–bazi and ru–howzi embody Bakhtin's notions of the grotesque and the carnivalesque. Gholam–siyah, the blackface clown, the 'low Other,' always wins over his master: the world upside down. Gholam–siyah's extravagant clothing, movements, speech, and lower–class language demonstrate Bakhtin's dictum, 'the grotesque...cannot be separated from folk humor and carnival spirit' (Stallybrass and White 1986, 43). Gholam's bright red costume and conical hat, for example, are probably the closest thing to carnival costume in the entire Middle East. William O. Beeman, a scholar of Iranian linguistics, discusses the blackface clown: 'The clown distorts normal physical movement by jumping, running, flailing his arms, and twisting his body into odd shapes' (1981, 515). This is, of course, part of his repertoire, for sight gags make up much of the comedy of traditional comic theater. This grotesque twisting of the body is also part of the dancing that occurs in the comic theater, especially by the male characters."

(Mass Mediations)

TAGS

Aranyer Din Ratri • Beverley Minster • burlesquecarnivalcarnivalesqueceremonychaosclowncollaborationcomedy • comic theatre • costumedemonstrationdialogicdisruption • Dostoevskys Poetics • emancipationetiquetteEuropean Renaissanceeventexcessextravagance • Feast of Fools • Feast of the Circumcision • Francois Rabelais • Fyodor Dostoyevsky • Gholam-siyah • grotesquehegemonyhumourimprovisationIran • Islamic Republic of Iran • juxtaposition • Lent • Lincoln Cathedral • Mardi Gras • medieval festival • Middle EastMikhail Bakhtin • New Orleans • outcastparticipationpeasant • Pieter Bruegel • polyphony • polyvocal • protestreligionRio de Janeiroriotritual • ru-howzi • sacred • siyah-bazi • social changesocial constructionismsocial hierarchiessocial interactionsocietyspectaclesubversiontheatretraditiontransformationtransgressionunmasked • Wise Children • world-upside-down

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
08 APRIL 2009

Virtual politics?

"A Twitter uprising has taken place in Moldova, with anti–communists using the internet site to mobilise supporters and organise a demonstration in the country's capital. [...]

This is not the first time that a Twitter tag has been used to mobilize young people around a particular event; the most famous previous case has been that of 'griots' – the tag used to report on the youth riots in Greece, which later spread to Europe, arguably also with the help of Twitter. Likewise there were reports that last week's G20 demonstrations were being organised by Twitter and certainly Twitter played a role in reporting on them."
(Richmond, 2009)

[The people in the streets seem pretty real to me, so it is by no means just a 'virtual' revolution; nevertheless the extent to which it was orchestrated through the internet brings a whole new meaning to the idea of democratic participation.]

TAGS

2009 • Chisinau • crowdsourcingdemonstrationG20 • G20 London 2009 • GreeceInternet • mobilisation • Moldova • participationpoliticsrevolutionsmart mobsTwitter

CONTRIBUTOR

Adina Huma
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