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Which clippings match 'Personal Data' keyword pg.1 of 2
05 DECEMBER 2016

Towards data justice? The ambiguity of anti-surveillance resistance in political activism

"The Snowden leaks, first published in June 2013, provided unprecedented insights into the operations of state-corporate surveillance, highlighting the extent to which everyday communication is integrated into an extensive regime of control that relies on the 'datafication' of social life. Whilst such data-driven forms of governance have significant implications for citizenship and society, resistance to surveillance in the wake of the Snowden leaks has predominantly centred on techno-legal responses relating to the development and use of encryption and policy advocacy around privacy and data protection. Based on in-depth interviews with a range of social justice activists, we argue that there is a significant level of ambiguity around this kind of anti-surveillance resistance in relation to broader activist practices, and critical responses to the Snowden leaks have been confined within particular expert communities. Introducing the notion of 'data justice', we therefore go on to make the case that resistance to surveillance needs to be (re)conceptualized on terms that can address the implications of this data-driven form of governance in relation to broader social justice agendas. Such an approach is needed, we suggest, in light of a shift to surveillance capitalism in which the collection, use and analysis of our data increasingly comes to shape the opportunities and possibilities available to us and the kind of society we live in."

(Lina Dencik, Arne Hintz and Jonathan Cable, 2016)

TAGS

2016activist practices • anti-surveillance resistance • Arne Hintz • big data • collection and processing of data • critical responses • Danielle Citron • data collection • data collection and retention • data encryption • data justice • data processes • data protectiondata security • data tracking • data-driven form of governance • data-driven forms of governance • datafication • datafication of social life • David Lyon • Edward Snowden • everyday communication • Frank Pasquale • individual rights • John Sylvia IV • Jonathan Cable • Lina Dencik • Miriyam Aouragh • Natasha Dow • personal data • policy advocacy • political activism • politics of data-driven processes • privacy • privacy and the protection of personal data • profiling • protection of personal data • regime of control • resistance to surveillance • retention of informationsocial justice • social justice activists • social justice agendas • social life • societal implications of data collection • state-corporate surveillance • surveillance • techno-legal responses

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
13 JULY 2016

Cassetteboy vs The Snoopers' Charter

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TAGS

2016Cassetteboycollaged togetherConservative partycut-upcut-up techniquedata securityDavid CameronEvery Breath You Take (song)information privacy • Investigatory Powers Bill • Mark Bolton • mash-uppersonal datapoliticianprivacy policy • privacy protection • re-editre-purposeremix culturesnoopers charter • snooping • social commentary • Steve Warlin • The Police (band) • Theresa MayUK • UK politics • use of private information

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
02 MARCH 2011

SmartGate: New Zealand & Australia passport control self-processing

"SmartGate gives some travellers the option to self–process through passport control. It uses the data in the e–Passport and face recognition technology to perform the customs and immigration checks that are usually conducted by a Customs officer.

An e–Passport has a microchip embedded in a hard plastic page and an international e–Passport symbol on the front cover. The microchip contains the same personal information that is on the photo page of the e–Passport, including an electronic copy of your photograph."

(Aotearoa New Zealand Department of Internal Affairs)

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TAGS

20072009 • airport security • Aotearoa New ZealandAustralia • Australian Customs and Border Protection Service • automation • biometric passport • Department of Internal Affairsdevice • e-Passport • faceface recognitionidentificationidentifyidentityimmigrationimmigration checksinnovationinternational travelmicrochip • New Zealand Customs Service • passportpassport controlpersonal datapersonal informationphotoscanning • self-processing • SmartGate • solutiontechnologytravelusability

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
30 MAY 2010

Software is increasingly making a difference to the constitution and production of everyday life

"The reason that a focus on Web 2.0 is significant and needed is because the popular web applications it represents are driven by users providing endless and virtually unlimited information about their everyday lives. To put it in Lash's terms, they are clearly on the inside of the everyday, they are up close, they afford direct and routine connections between people and software. We have not yet begun to think through how this personal information might be harvested and used. A starting point would be to find out how this information about everyday mundane lives is being mined, how this feeds into 'relational databases', and with what consequences: the very types of question that are being asked by the writers discussed here. Alongside this it is also important that we consider how the information provided by users, and other 'similar' users, might affect the things they come across. If we return to Last.fm, which 'learns' users' tastes and preferences and provides them with their own taste–specific online radio station, it is possible to appreciate how the music that people come across and listen to has become a consequence of algorithms. This is undoubtedly an expression of power, not of someone having power over someone else, but of the software making choices and connections in complex and unpredictable ways in order to shape the everyday experiences of the user. How we find the books that shape our writing could be a question we might ask ourselves if we wish to consider the power that algorithms exercise over us and over the formation of knowledge within our various disciplines. (I know of at least two occasions when Amazon has located a book of interest for me that has then gone on to form an important part of a published work.) This is not just about Amazon, it would also include searches on Google Scholar, the use of the bookmarking site Del.icio.us, the RSS feeds we might use, or the likely coming applications that will predict, locate and recommend research articles we might be interested in. Readers based in the UK will also by now be considering the power of algorithms to decide the allocation of research funding as the role of metrics in the forthcoming Research Excellence Framework (REF) are finalized."

(David Beer, 996–997)

Beer, D. (2009). "Power through the algorithm? Participatory web cultures and the technological unconscious." New Media & Society 11(6).

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TAGS

2009Amazon.com • blogjects • Bruce Sterling • coded objects • cognisphere • communicationcontent creation • context-aware • convergencecrisis of empiricism • cultural formations • cultural formsdatadata miningDel.icio.usdigital culturedynamic interfaceseveryday lifeflows • geodemographic classification • Google Scholarhuman agencyidentityinformationinformation society • intelligent devices • internet of thingsKatherine HaylesLast.fm • logjects • marketing discrimination • mediationmetadatamodes of being • modes of classification • modes of knowing • new media • new new media ontology • Nigel Thrift • old mediaperformative infrastructurespersonal data • post-hegemony • powerResearch Excellence FrameworkRFIDRoger BurrowsRSSScott Lashsocial bookmarkingsocial networkingsocial participation • software sorting • SPIMES • Steve Graham • technological unconscious • technology • transducting space • transformationubiquitous information flowsUKurban studiesvirtual spacesWeb 2.0William Mitchell

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
30 MAY 2010

Google Street View Cars Peep Your Wi-Fi

"Nine days ago the data protection authority (DPA) in Hamburg, Germany asked to audit the WiFi data that our Street View cars collect for use in location–based products like Google Maps for mobile, which enables people to find local restaurants or get directions. His request prompted us to re–examine everything we have been collecting, and during our review we discovered that a statement made in a blog post on April 27 was incorrect.

In that blog post, and in a technical note sent to data protection authorities the same day, we said that while Google did collect publicly broadcast SSID information (the WiFi network name) and MAC addresses (the unique number given to a device like a WiFi router) using Street View cars, we did not collect payload data (information sent over the network). But it's now clear that we have been mistakenly collecting samples of payload data from open (i.e. non–password–protected) WiFi networks, even though we never used that data in any Google products.

However, we will typically have collected only fragments of payload data because: our cars are on the move; someone would need to be using the network as a car passed by; and our in–car WiFi equipment automatically changes channels roughly five times a second. In addition, we did not collect information traveling over secure, password–protected WiFi networks."

(Google, 14/05/2010 01:44:00 PM)

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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