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Which clippings match 'Interior Architecture' keyword pg.1 of 1
21 MARCH 2015

Inside the White Cube: The Ideology of the Gallery Space

"A gallery is constructed along laws as rigorous as those for build­ing a medieval church. The outside world must not come in, so windows are usually sealed off. Walls are painted white. The ceil­ing becomes the source of light. The wooden floor is polished so that you click along clinically, or carpeted so that you pad soundlessly, resting the feet while the eyes have at the wall. The art is free, as the saying used to go, 'to take on its own life.' The discreet desk may be the only piece of furniture. In this context a standing ashtray becomes almost a sacred object, just as the firehose in a modern museum looks not like a firehose but an esthetic conundrum. Modernism's transposition of perception from life to formal values is complete. This, of course, is one of modernism's fatal diseases."

(Brian O'Doherty, 1986)

Brian O'Doherty (1986). "Inside the White Cube: The Ideology of the Gallery Space", The Lapis Press.

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TAGS

1976 • aesthetic conundrum • art is free • artistic modernism • Brian O Doherty • clean design • clean white box • design formalismform and function • formal values • functional formgallery spacesideology of the gallery spaceinterior architecturemedieval church • modern museum • modernist aestheticsmodernist design principlesmorphology • neutral gallery space • neutral space • neutral white box • non-placeobjectivity • painted white • polished wooden floor • programmed useregulationsacred spacessingle-minded spacesspatial configurationspatial literacy • structural features • symbolic place • symbolic structures • Thomas McEvilley • transposition of perception • tyranny of modernism • tyranny of modernist aesthetics • white box • white cube • white wa

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
22 OCTOBER 2012

KBU Interior Architecture & Design Student Club

"KBU Interior Architecture and Design (KBUIAD) club is a platform for all KBU IAD students to showcase projects, get updated with the upcoming events in the school and share information and thoughts related to Interior Architecture & Design."

(Chiang Siew Leng, Malaysia)

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TAGS

applied knowledgeart and designdesign bloggingdesign coursedesign practicedesign schooldesign studentsdesign workinterior architectureinterior design • KBU • KBU IAD • KBU Interior Architecture and Design • KBU International College • KBUIAD • Kolej Bandar Utama • Kuala LumpurMalaysiaproject-based learningshowcase • student blog • student community • student exhibitionstudent projectsstudent showcasestudent workstudentsweblog

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
31 MARCH 2012

Stylus: business intelligence and inspiration to drive new ideas

"Culture & Media reveals how the worlds of entertainment, media and digital and the creative side of marketing and advertising influence cultural movements that impact on business decisions. Expert reports on art, graphics, illustration and global exhibitions offer visual inspiration for inquisitive creative minds."

(Stylus media group)

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TAGS

account manager • active leisure time • advertisingart and cultureart worldB2Bbrand managerbrand strategy • business decisions • buyers • childrenswear • colour • colour trends • commercial implications • commercial insightconsumer lifestylesconsumer productsconsumer products in homeconsumer trendscreative business insightscreative directorcreative industriescreative intelligence • creative marketing • creative media • creatively led retailing • cross-sector innovation • culture and media • design and cultural influences • design inspirationdesign magazinedesign resourcedesign trendsdigital commerce • entertainment news • expert information • expert report • fashion buyers • fashion design • fashion designers • fashion manufacturing • fashion retail • furniture designfuture concepts • gastronomy • global analysis • global expert opinion • global information • graduate showsgraphic designerhome accessories • hospitality • in-depth analysis • industrial design • industry executives • innovative design • inquisitive creative minds • insider guides • inspirational destinations • inspirational visual contentinspiring design • inspiring illustration • interior architectureinterior stylingknowledge based economyleisure industrieslifestyle • marketing manager • material trends • materials innovationmenswear • merchandise planner • merchandising and management • new productsnew servicesonline magazine • packaging designer • product designer • product developer • product directions • product launches • product manager • retail analysis • retail landscape • revenue-building ideasscience and technology • seasonal colour inspiration • sports and leisure • sports industries • store design • Stylus (magazine) • subscription service • sustainable thinking • technology innovationtextilestravel and leisure • travel industries • trend analysis • trend setting • trendsvisual communicationvisual culturevisual designvisual inspiration • visual merchandiser • visual merchandisingwomenswear • youth and beauty

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
18 MARCH 2011

A house is a symbolic place that regulates privacy

"A house is a symbolic place combining paradoxical concepts that can easily be identified as 'binary codes.' Internal and external, private and public, female and male, sacred and profane, clean and dirty are binary codes used to explain roles and activities of people in spaces (Lawrence, 1990; Ünlü, 1999). The spatial configuration of house layouts may be different in different periods, regions, cultures, and societies. Societies establish order in their livelihood spaces and reflect their personalities in these spaces.

There is a mutual relationship between space and human relations. The differences in social systems reveal morphological diversity in house layouts. The family contains the socio–economical structure of society; although it is a small element, it is the cornerstone that forms the future of society. The family needs a specific space, a house, to achieve this function based on their characteristics and the desired level of privacy (Sungur and Çagdas, 2003).

Privacy is a dynamic topological property of space; therefore, it should be approached in an analogous manner. Spaces could be categorized not only depending on their degree of privacy, but also according to their capacity to regulate privacy. At the same time, complementary approach counters the strict categorization of spaces into either public or private. According to that point of view, architectural space and its various elements should act as regulators of privacy. Space and its elements should be able to increase or decrease privacy according to the customized needs of its occupants (Georgiou, 2006).

Robinson (2001) identified different zones of privacy within a single Midwestern house and pinpointed their importance for the individual. Robinson argues that through a series of spaces with different degrees of privacy, the autonomy of the resident within a small social group is provided. Furthermore, the individual is granted a large measure of control over time, space, activity, and social interaction."

(Faris Ali Mustafa, Ahmad Sanusi Hassan and Salahaddin Yasin Baper, August 2010)

Faris Ali Mustafa, Ahmad Sanusi Hassan and Salahaddin Yasin Baper (2011). 'Institutional Space, Domestic Space, and Power Relations: Revisiting territoriality with space syntax', Asian Social Science, Vol. 6, No. 8, ISSN 1911–2025 (Online), Canadian Center of Science and Education

TAGS

architectural space • clean • degrees of privacy • designdesign formalismdirtydwelling • external space • functional design • habitationhousehuman relations • interior • interior architectureinterior design • internal space • intimacy gradients • layoutmorphologyplaceprivacyprivateprofaneregulationsacredsacred spacessequence of spacesspacespatial configurationspatial literacysymbolic placeterritorytopology

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
14 MARCH 2009

U-Bahnhof Oberwiesenfeld

"An U–Bahn–Knotenpunkten überkreuzen, zerren, stauen sich die Ströme des öffentlichen Verkehrs. Rudolf Herz 'stilisiert' diese ineinander fließenden Transportwege zu einem abstrakten Muster, einem sogenannten 'anamorphotischen' – das heißt verzerrt angelegten – Labyrinth. Bereits Hans Holbein d. J. hat die Anamorphose als Stilmittel eingesetzt: Auf seinem berühmten Londoner Gemälde der "Gesandten" (1533) gibt sich ein verzerrt reflektierter Totenkopf nur aus einer einzigen Perspektive zu erkennen. Wenn Rudolf Herz nun die weitgehend vergessene Idee der künstlerischen Anamorphose in einen U–Bahnhof des 21. Jahrhundert übersetzt, dann bedient er sich hierzu der künstlerischen Mittel des Minimalismus. Zwei diametral entgegen gesetzte Ansichten seiner schwarzweißen Streifenwand sind möglich: Was sich frontal als rhythmische, nur scheinbar unlogische Anordnung von übereinander gestaffelten Balken in Schwarz und Weiß herauskristallisiert, verschmilzt von einer seitlichen Perspektive aus zum Labyrinth. Erst der exzentrische Blick von den Zugängen aus fügt die Balken zu einem erkennbaren Motiv. Je weiter sich die Fluchtlinien vom Betrachter entfernen, um so kleinteiliger zieht sich das Ornament des Labyrinths zusammen. Der Art–Déco–Eleganz des Labyrinths antwortet auf der gegenüberliegenden Wand eine Lamellenfläche in dezent mattem Orange–Rot. An einem Ort der Ortlosigkeit wie der U–Bahn wird der Blick somit in ein spannendes Vexierspiel verstrickt."
(Birgit Sonna)

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TAGS

Art Deco • binarydesignengineeringenvironmentforminterior architecture • Rudolf Herz • spacestructure • U-Bahn • U-Bahnhof Oberwiesenfeld

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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