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09 APRIL 2011

The death and rebirth of Duke Nukem Forever: a history

"Duke Nukem Forever was announced in 1997, after its predecessor, Duke Nukem 3D, had rocked the PC market with a hero who liked kicking ass, hanging out with strippers, and murdering alien police officers that were, literally, pigs. It was inappropriate, raunchy, and amazing.

It was also one of the games that gave 3D Realms the success that brought its destruction. Duke Nukem Forever began life as a completely self–funded game; its developer wanted nothing less than perfection, and would chase every update in technology in order to deliver it. The game saw monumental delays, suffered the slings and arrows of a gaming world that was first angry and then tolerant of its favorite whipping boy, had its home taken away, and has since risen from the dead.

Is the public still interested in Duke Nukem? Hell yes it is. This is the story of the gaming industry's favorite joke, and how Duke may finally have the last laugh."

(Ben Kuchera, 7 September 2010)

Fig.1 'Duke Nukem Forever | History of a Legend Episode 1', 2011

Fig.2 trailer from Electronic Entertainment Expo, 1998

Fig.3 video capture of 1991 side–scrolling 'Duke Nukum' version

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TAGS

19911993199619972011 • 3D Realms • action heroalien invasion • Allen Blum • anti-hero • Apogee Softwarecharacter designcomic bookcomputer gameconsolecultural literacydeveloperdigital cultureDuke NukemDuke Nukem 3D • Duke Nukem Forever • Duke Nukem II • Duke Nukem: Manhattan Project • Duke Nukum • E3Electronic Entertainment Expo (E3)first-person shootergames • Gearbox Software • George Broussard • graphic representationheavy metalhistoryhomoeroticismhumour • Joe Siegler • Jon St. John • kick ass • kick ass and chew bubble gum • lair • Los AngelesmisogynyparodyPC gamesPlaystation 3point of viewpop-culture • Randy Pitchford • renegade • run and gunScott Millerself-fundedself-referentialsequel • SHMUP • side-scroller • spectaclestory • Todd Replogle • video gameviolencevisual depictionWolfenstein 3DXbox 360

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
29 MAY 2010

The Creative Industries KTN: the future of digital content

"This document has been created to help people understand the radical transformation digital content will have on the creative industries, and to provide businesses with outline areas of opportunity where innovation is most likely to occur.

In the past decade, digital content has become a part of everyday life for all. Yet the changes that will occur in the next 5–10 years will be profound. They have the power to alter the way we live, work, play, learn and help us to live longer, more fulfilling lives. These changes will substantially alter existing business models and markets.

Many historical innovations such as new recording formats, more powerful consoles and new advertising media were incremental. They changed formats and created new opportunities, but they did not alter the industrial landscape. The changes taking place now are paradigm shifts that challenge the value chain as a whole.

These changes represent huge opportunities, or threats if not understood. For games designers, it may mean the migration from console platforms to cloud based applications and casual gaming communities. For TV programmes it may mean the end of broadcast, where their content must be found and consumed on numerous devices. For publishers it may mean the migration to new consumption platforms that radically alter distribution channels. For industrial designers, it may mean the need to move from object creation to experience creation. For all it means the need to radically shift their thinking.

The following pages outline the key areas highlighted by a project that has engaged with hundreds of key stakeholders across the creative industries and technology industries seeking to map the landscape of the future of digital content."

(Kelechi Amadi, March 2010)

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2010 • advertising media • Beacons for Innovation • broadcastingbusiness modelscasual gaming • casual gaming communities • cloud based applications • cloud computingconsoleconsumptionconsumption platformsconvergencecreative economycreative industriesCreative Industries Knowledge Transfer Networkdigital contentdistributioneconomic changeexperience creationformat • games consoles • historical innovations • industrial landscape • innovationKnowledge Transfer Networkknowledge-based economyKTNmarketsnew mediaold mediaparadigm shiftplatformsproduct designrecordingtechnology • technology industries • Technology Strategy Boardthe future of digital contenttransformation • TSB • TVUKvalue chain

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
08 DECEMBER 2009

Gamers and Gorehounds: The Influence of Video Games on the Contemporary Horror Film

"In translating a digital game to the big screen, these titles rely on the integration of aesthetics and narrative from their game counterparts to further enhance the viewing experience. The utilization of game narrative in the horror adaptation film is partially based on the acceptance of the video game medium as a cyberdrama, which emphasizes 'the enactment of the story in the particular fictional space of the computer.'[54] Many popular titles were not only about motor coordination and skill, but about becoming immersed in good storytelling. Author Janet Murray states, 'A story has greater emphasis on plot; a game has greater emphasis on the actions of the player. But where the player is also the protagonist or the god of the story world, then player action and plot event begin to merge.'[55] Murray describes the player's attachment to the game narrative as dramatic agency, which 'requires that we script the interactor as well as the world, so that we know how to engage the world, and so that we build up the appropriate expectations.'[56] "

(Timothy D. Alley, p.47, 2007)

54. Janet Murray, "From Game–Story to Cyberdrama." First Person. Eds. Noah Wardrip– Fruin and Pat Harrigan (Cambridge, MA: The MIT P, 2004) 4.

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aesthetics • Brainscan • consoleconvergenceculture • cyberdrama • David Cronenbergdigital culture • Doom • Duke Nukem 3Ddystopia • eXistenZ (1999) • first-person point of viewfirst-person shooterFPS • Freddys Dead • gamesGrand Theft Autohorrorhorror filmJanet Murray • Lawnmower Man • mediumQuakeremediationrepresentationtechnologytechnophobiaThe Matrix (1999)The Wizard of Ozvideo gamevirtual realityvisual communicationvisual designvisual languageWolfenstein 3Dzombie • zombie invasion

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
14 MARCH 2009

Retro Space: retro gaming console

"Martijn Koch makes a nod to the '70s while looking into the new millennium. With over 100 classic games (and emulators!) to choose from, one or two player will be the least of your problems. There's 2GHz Intel Core2Duo computer, 2Gb RAM, 120Gb HD, WiFi, Bluetooth, Gigabit Ethernet, DVI BT keyword for cordless typing and trackball for OS operation. The HD media jukebox is a nice touch – way to poop all over the old graphics. You can also get creative and tweak Retro Space to use as a video phone, as a terminal to control your house appliances, let it monitor and talk to unwanted visitors, or even use it as web or media server. Nolan Bushnell would be proud...you've come a long way, baby."
(via Brennan Woods, The Pursuit Aesthetic)

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coin operatedconsoledeviceemulatorgamesjukebox • Martijn Koch • Nolan Bushnell • product design • Retro Space • technologyvideo arcade

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
24 FEBRUARY 2004

Micro Music: Gameboyzz Orchestra

"The reason for creating the "gameboyzz orchestra" was the total lack of any artistic initiatives and activities connected with the cult GameBoy console. The GameBoy console is an 8–bit handheld computer. Its unusually weak (archaic) technical parameters were a challenge and became the reason for creating the "gameboyzz orchestra."We are not an orthodox group and we utilize the latest technologies along with the retro ones used by musicians associated in the MICROMUSIC society whose key word is "low–tech music for high–tech people"–www.micromusic.net. The employed software is written specifically for the GameBoy console [trackers, sequencers, drum machines, etc.; sounds generated live and games]. The sound is accompanied by video projections, lights, smoke, etc."
(Jeroslaw Kujda)

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TAGS

consoledrum machineGameboy • GameBoy console • gameboyzz orchestra • handheld computer • lo-filow-tech • Micro Music • micromusicmusicNintendoretrosequencervideo projection
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