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Which clippings match 'Pokemon' keyword pg.1 of 1
18 NOVEMBER 2016

Moby & The Void Pacific Choir: Are You Lost In The World Like Me?

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
23 NOVEMBER 2009

Pokémon evolution chains

"Evolution is a key part of the Pokémon games. Evolving Pokémon makes them stronger and often gives them a wider movepool. Moreover, many species of Pokémon are only obtainable through evolution.

There are several methods of evolution, with more variations being added with each game. In Red/Blue/Yellow, a Pokémon might evolve by training it to a certain level, applying an elemental stone, or trading via cable link.

In Gold/Silver/Crystal, additional methods were added, namely happiness level and trading with a held item. Later games added yet more based on things such as gender, time of day or after a certain move is learned."

(Pokémon Database)

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TAGS

crystalevolution • evolution by elemental stones • evolution by level • evolution by trading • evolution chains • gamegoldNintendoNintendo DSPokemon • silver • superhero

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
23 NOVEMBER 2009

Intertextual Enterprises: Writing Alternative Places and Meanings in the Media Mixed Networks of Yugioh

"The media mix of Pokemon, and subsequent series such as Digimon and Yugioh, create a virtual world that manifests in multiple media forms, and though which consumers can craft their own narrative trajectories through play with video and card games (Allison 2002; Tobin 2004a). This is a networked world of expanding reference that destabilizes the prior orthodoxy of children's media (Tobin 2004a). Rather than spoon–feed stabilized narratives and heroes to a supposedly passive audience, Pokemon and Yugioh invite children to collect, acquire, recombine, and enact stories within their peer networks, trading cards, information, and monsters (Buckingham and Sefton–Green 2004; Yano 2004) in what Sefton–Green has called a 'knowledge industry' (Sefton–Green 2004, 151). These media mixes challenge our ideas of childhood agency and the passivity of media consumption, highlighting the active, entrepreneurial, and technologized aspects of children's engagement with popular culture. They also create a proliferating set of contact points between practice, media, and imaginings, as players perform and identify with media characters in multiple and often unexpected ways.

An early draft of a paper published in Debbora Battaglia Ed. Encountering the Extraterrestrial: Anthropology in Outerspaces. Duke University Press. 2005. This paper was first presented at the 2002 meetings of the American Anthropological Association"

(Mimi Ito)

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TAGS

2005 • alternative places • card gamechildhood agencychildrens mediacollaborationcollectcommunityconsumersDigimondigital culture • enact • engagemententrepreneurshipgamesheroesimaginingsinteractionintertextuality • knowledge industry • media characters • media consumption • media mix • Mimi Itomonster • narrative trajectories • narrativesnetworked worldorthodoxypassive audience • peer networks • play • players • Pokemonpopular culture • recombine • social interaction • stabilisation • story • technologised • trading cardsvideovirtual worldYugioh

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
12 MARCH 2009

Mimi Ito: ecologies of cultural production and exchange

"Many of the essays in this volume bear witness to the powerful alchemy of personal cultural production and communication combined with large–scale networks of digital distribution and archiving. While the implications of peer–to–peer exchange for the media industries have attracted considerable public attention, there has been much less consideration of how these exchanges operate in the everyday practices of individuals. In a world of networked and viral cultural exchange–of cultural life captured in distributed archives, indexed by search engines, and aggregated into microcontent feeds for personal information portals...

The current digital culture ecology introduces two key sociotechnical innovations central to my framing of the Yugioh case. The first (guided primarily by media industries and by Japanese culture industries in particular), involves the construction of increasingly pervasive mass–media ecologies that integrate in–home media such as television and game consoles, location–based media such as cinema and special events, and portable media such as trading cards and handheld games. Following the industry label, I call this the 'media mix.' The second (primarily user–driven) is characterized by peer–to–peer ecologies of cultural production and exchange (of information, objects, and money) pursued among geographically–local peer groups, among dispersed populations mediated by the Internet, and through national peer–to–peer trade shows. This is what I call 'hypersociality.' These twinned innovations describe an emergent set of technologies of the imagination, where certain offerings of culture industries articulate with (and provide fodder for) an exploding network of digitally–augmented cultural production and exchange, fed by interactive and networked cultural forms.

Together, these dynamics describe a set of imaginaries–shared cultural representations and understandings–that are both pervasive and integrated into quotidian life and pedestrian social identity, and no longer strictly bracketed as media spectacles, special events, and distant celebrity. I treat the imagination as a 'collective social fact,' built on the spread of certain media technologies at particular historical junctures (Appadurai 1996a, 5). Anderson (1991) argues that the printing press and standardized vernaculars were instrumental to the 'imagined community' of the nation state. With the circulation of mass electronic media, Appadurai suggests that people have an even broader range of access to different shared imageries and narratives, whether in the form of popular music, television dramas, or cinema. Media images are now pervasive in our everyday lives, and form much of the material through with we imagine our world, relate to others, and engage in collective action, often in ways that depart from the relations and identities produced more locally.

To appear in Joe Karaganis and Natalie Jeremijenko Ed., Structures of Participation in Digital Culture. Duke University Press, 2005."
(Mizuko Ito)

Fig. 1 Cika. 'Yu GI Oh Sketch Collection', Deviantart.

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TAGS

authorshipchildhood imaginationcomputer game charactercultural forms • cultural production and exchange • cultural signalscultureDigimondigital culture • digital culture ecology • digital technologydoujinfandom • hypersociality • media culture • media mixes • Mimi Itootakupeer-to-peer exchangepersonal cultural productionPokemonremix culturescriptiblesharingsocial constructionism • sociotechnical • Yugioh

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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