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Which clippings match 'Computer Science' keyword pg.1 of 4
20 JANUARY 2014

What industry say fusion skills really are?

Friday 31st January 2014 at the London Knowledge Lab: Presentations 1:30–2:30; Demos 2:30–3:30; Discussion and debate: 3:30–4:30.

"Digital media is now ubiquitous and embedded all around us even when we are not connected via our range of devices, so its no surprise that the government sees the creative industries as a priority area for growth. One factor key to its success is that of the so–called 'Fusion Skills': mixes of creative media, STEM and enterprise. The fusion of these three elements is an increasing demand from industry voices and seen as an answer to new digital innovation. In 2012, The Creative Industries Council (that reports to two ministers of state) called Fusion 'the new skills imperative' and one of eight challenges that need to be addressed in order to unlock growth. This 'what the research says' event attempts to unpack and explore Fusion in theory and practice, hearing from industry and educators. It's said that Higher Education faculty and discipline silos necessitate against fusion learning and teaching. ...

How do we co–opt students who are resistant to such abstract ideas, preferring outdated career caricatures from sources of variable quality? Where should interventions be– secondary school? Postgraduate? Is there hard evidence that Fusion skills are needed?"

(London Knowledge Lab)

TAGS

2014arts and humanities • career charicatures • computer sciencecreative economycreative industries • Creative Industries Council • creative media • creative problem solving skills • current thinking • digital mediadigital technology • disciplinary silos • embeddedenterpriseenterprise and creativity • Fusion Challenge • fusion skill • fusion skills • industry voices • interdisciplinary approacheslearning and teaching • Learning Innovation Education • LKL Innovations • LondonLondon Knowledge LabNESTA • new digital innovation • priority area for growth • Saint John Walker • silosSTEM subjects • the new skills imperative • theory and practice • TransFusion Conference • ubiquitousUK • unlock growth

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
11 DECEMBER 2013

Divining a Digital Future - Paul Dourish and Genevieve Bell

"Ubiquitous computing (or 'ubicomp') is the label for a 'third wave' of computing technologies. Following the eras of the mainframe computer and the desktop PC, ubicomp is characterized by small and powerful computing devices that are worn, carried, or embedded in the world around us. The ubicomp research agenda originated at Xerox PARC in the late 1980s; these days, some form of that vision is a reality for the millions of users of Internet–enabled phones, GPS devices, wireless networks, and 'smart' domestic appliances. In Divining a Digital Future, computer scientist Paul Dourish and cultural anthropologist Genevieve Bell explore the vision that has driven the ubiquitous computing research program and the contemporary practices that have emerged––both the motivating mythology and the everyday messiness of lived experience.

Reflecting the interdisciplinary nature of the authors' collaboration, the book takes seriously the need to understand ubicomp not only technically but also culturally, socially, politically, and economically. Dourish and Bell map the terrain of contemporary ubiquitous computing, in the research community and in daily life; explore dominant narratives in ubiquitous computing around such topics as infrastructure, mobility, privacy, and domesticity; and suggest directions for future investigation, particularly with respect to methodology and conceptual foundations."

Paul Dourish and Genevieve Bell (2011). "Divining a Digital Future: Mess and Mythology in Ubiquitous Computing", MIT Press, May 2011, ISBN 978–0–262–01555–4.

TAGS

1980s2011computer sciencecomputingcontemporary practices • contemporary ubiquitous computing • cultural anthropologydaily lifedesktop computer • desktop PC • Divining a Digital Future (book) • domesticity • embedded in the world around us • everyday messiness • feature phone • future investigation • Genevieve Bell • GPS devices • infrastructureinterdisciplinary collaboration • internet-enabled phones • lived experiencemainframemobility • Paul Dourish • privacyresearch communityresearch methodology • small and powerful computing devices • smart domestic appliances • smart phones • third wave of computing technologies • ubicomp • ubicomp research • ubiquitous computing • ubiquitous computing research • wireless networkswornXerox PARC

CONTRIBUTOR

Liam Birtles
28 MARCH 2013

All students should have the opportunity to be creative with code

This is a useful initiative, despite its narrow focus on engineering and science. It would be great to see the companion film which profiles creative arts and design professionals who regularly use programming as part of their practice/work.

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
06 NOVEMBER 2012

Design Principles and Practices: a knowledge community

SEVENTH INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON DESIGN PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICES, Japan
Proposals for In–Person Presentations Due: 6 December 2012

"The International Conference on Design Principles and Practices, its associated design journals, the On Design Book Series and the Design News Blog are sites of discussion which explore the meaning and purpose of design. Participants in these forums also speaking in grounded ways about the task of design and the use of designed artifacts and processes. The Conference, Journal, Book Imprint and News Blog support a cross–disciplinary knowledge community, bringing together researchers, teachers and practitioners to discuss the nature and future of design. The resulting conversations weave between the theoretical and the empirical, research and application, market pragmatics and social idealism.

In professional and disciplinary terms, the conference, journals, book series and online media traverse a broad sweep to construct a transdisciplinary dialogue which encompasses the perspectives and practices of: anthropology, architecture, art, artificial intelligence, business, cognitive science, communication studies, computer science, cultural studies, design studies, education, e–learning, engineering, ergonomics, fashion, graphic design, history, information systems, industrial design, industrial engineering, instructional design, interior design, interaction design, interface design, journalism, landscape architecture, law, linguistics and semiotics, management, media and entertainment, psychology, sociology, software engineering, technical communication, telecommunications, urban planning and visual design–to name some of the design disciplines."

(Common Ground)

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TAGS

2012academic journalanthropologyarchitectureartificial intelligencecognitive scienceCommon Ground (publishing) • communication studies • computer sciencecross-disciplinary knowledge communitycross-disciplinary researchcultural studiesdesign businessdesign disciplinedesign disciplinesdesign educationdesign history • design journals • design managementdesign practitioners • design purpose • design research • design researchers • design studies • design teachers • designed artefacts • e-learningempirical researchengineeringergonomicsfashion designfine artfuture of designgraphic designindustrial designindustrial engineeringinformation systemsinstructional designinteraction designinterface designinterior design • International Conference on Design Principles and Practices • journalismknowledge communitylandscape architecturelawlinguistics • market pragmatics • media and entertainment • professional contextpsychologysemiotics • social idealism • sociologysoftware engineering • technical communication • telecommunications • theoretical research • transdisciplinary dialogue • urban planningvisual design

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
21 MAY 2012

Udacity: open courseware for software engineering

"We believe university–level education can be both high quality and low cost. Using the economics of the Internet, we've connected some of the greatest teachers to hundreds of thousands of students in almost every country on Earth. Udacity was founded by three roboticists who believed much of the educational value of their university classes could be offered online for very low cost. A few weeks later, over 160,000 students in more than 190 countries enrolled in our first class, 'Introduction to Artificial Intelligence.' The class was twice profiled by the New York Times and also by other news media. Now we're a growing team of educators and engineers, on a mission to change the future of education."

(Udacity, Inc., 2012)

Fig.1 "CS253: Web Application Engineering. Learn about engineering web applications with Steve Huffman! By the end of the class, you will have built your own blog to share with the world."

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TAGS

2012artificial intelligence • Charles River Ventures • computer science • course content • course-delivery modelcoursewarecrowdlearning • economics of the Internet • educationeducation technologyeducational media • educational value • elearning • free classes • free courses online • high quality at low cost • how to • Know Labs • learnlearninglearning resourceMassive Open Online CoursesMOOCsonline classesonline lecturesopenopen coursewareOpen Educational Resources (OER) • opencourseware • repositoryresourceroboticistsoftware engineeringStanford University • Steve Huffman • supplemental learningteaching materialstechnology educationUdacity • university classes • web-based publication

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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