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19 NOVEMBER 2014

Generic and self-programmable labour

"Labour is fundamentally divided in two categories: self–programmable labour, and generic labour. Self–programmable labour is equipped with the ability to retrain itself, and adapt to new tasks, new processes and new sources of information, as technology, demand, and management speed up their rate of change. Generic labour, by contrast, is exchangeable and disposable, and co–exists in the same circuits with machines and with unskilled labour from around the world."

(Manuel Castells, 2000, p.16)

Castells, M. (2000). "Materials for an exploratory theory of the network society". British Journal of Sociology Vol. No. 51 Issue No. 1 (January/March 2000) pp. 5–24 [http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals].

Fig.1 Photograph: Keystone/Getty Images.

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TAGS

2000adaptabilityadapting to changedisposable • exchangeable • generic labour • independent decision-makingindividual initiative • industrial workforce • knowledge worker • labour market • Manuel Castellsprogrammed useself-programmable laboursingle-mindedsocial anthropology • unskilled labour • workforce

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
06 NOVEMBER 2013

The x:talk project: a sex worker-led knowledge sharing co-operative

"In early 2006 several activists based in London who are involved in sex worker rights activism, organising within the International Union of Sex Workers in particular, began to conceptualise and organise around the x:talk project–one that would seek to explore and expand the ideas and confidence we have developed in criticising the mainstream human trafficking discourse, drawing on insights we have gained from sex workers', migrant and feminist struggles.

The racist and anti–feminist trafficking rhetoric of 'protection', mainstream anti–trafficking campaigns that reduce women to only passive victims, under the control of organised crime or of cruel men produces and justifies deportation of migrant sex workers and increases the criminalisation and exploitation of workers in the sex industry. It creates divisions between migrants' and sex workers' forms of organisation and resistance.

We found language and communication to be crucial elements to directly challenge and change conditions of work and life, and to come to together and to organise. Communication is in our view central to change. Language is a basic individual and collective power that improves both possibilities to work and possibilities of resistance.

Central to our vision stands the autonomy of all people moving across borders and the dignity of every gender employing their resources in the sex industry. Central to our understanding of gender and social relations is an understanding of sex work as labour. People who sell sex are involved in a labour process in many respects similar to other paid personal services exchanged on market. At the same time we recognise that the ways in which sex work has existed are also deeply interrelated to the ways in which 'female' services, such as caring, domestic, sexual and reproductive activities are supposed to be provided. It is important to consider that the demand for money for sex in a transparent and potentially contractual way is often a break and significant shift in the way women are expected to give these services for no remuneration.

We consider that a feminist analysis and practice is crucial to changing the sex industry. Women represent the majority of workers in the industry and gendered sexualised and reproductive labour have historically constituted a central part in the structures that subordinate and oppress women. The people that have taken the main initiative of this organisation and project are women. Starting from the ground up, in a grass roots way we nevertheless aim to work with the whole industry. Due to the demographics of the workforce in the sex industry, women play a central role in the organisation and are expected to make up a majority of participants in the classes. We/they represent the majority and we/they enjoy the strongest voice at the moment. However issues of gender and transgender difference–at their intersections with racial and sexual issues are taken into account in the development of activities in order to include people from across the industry and from diverse backgrounds.

In contrast to the current mainstream anti–trafficking policies and discourses we work towards the improvement of working conditions in the sex industry; for rights and recognition of workers; the right to change work and not to be forced to stay with the same employer and the right to stay and not to be deported. Our organisation is based on a practice of sex workers self organisation and our projects are primarily built on an activity of networking with those that have already organised similar projects according to these principles."

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TAGS

2006activism • anti-trafficking campaigns • anti-trafficking discourses • anti-trafficking policies • autonomyborders • co-operative • collective power • criminalisation • cruel men • deportation • dignity • domestic services • empowermentexploitation • female services • feminist analysisfeminist perspectivefeminist struggles • forced labour • gender and social relations • gender difference • gendered labour • grass roots • human trafficking • immigrant experience • International Union of Sex Workers • knowledge sharing • labour process • language barrierslanguage learnerslanguage of thingslanguage skillslanguages of legitimationLondon • migrant sex worker • migrant struggles • migrant workers • organised crime • passive victims • personal services • power relationsprostituteprostitutionprotectionracist language • remuneration • reproductive activities • reproductive labour • rights and recognition • safeguarding • safer conditions • sexsex industry • sex work • sex worker • sex worker rights • sex workers • sexual exploitation • sexual issues • sexual slavery • sexualised labour • subordinate womentrafficking • trafficking rhetoric • transgender difference • victimwomenworkforce • working conditions • x:talk project

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
26 SEPTEMBER 2013

A New Video to Present Lithuania's Business Environment

"A new video has been released to showcase Lithuania to foreign investors. The video was developed in collaboration with current investors and it presents the country as it is perceived through their eyes. It focuses on forward thinking people, who are full of ideas, drive and energy. People who are self–starters."

(26 September 2013, Invest in Lithuania)

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TAGS

2013awareness raisingbrand experiencebrand identitybrand recognitionbusiness • business environment • country brandscountry showcasedestination brand identitydestination brandingdestination imageeconomic growth • economic investment • economy • financial investment • foreign investmentinfrastructure • Invest in Lithuania (agency) • invest in people • Lithuaniamodern economy • Republic of Lithuania • skilled workforceworkforce

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
27 APRIL 2013

A Manifesto for the UK Creative Economy

"The UK's creative economy is one of its great national strengths, historically deeply rooted and accounting for around one–tenth of the whole economy. It provides jobs for 2.5 million people – more than in financial services, advanced manufacturing or construction – and in recent years, this creative workforce has grown four times faster than the workforce as a whole.

But behind this success lies much disruption and business uncertainty, associated with digital technologies. Previously profitable business models have been swept away, young companies from outside the UK have dominated new internet markets, and some UK creative businesses have struggled to compete.

UK policymakers too have failed to keep pace with developments in North America and parts of Asia. But it is not too late to refresh tired policies. This manifesto sets out our 10–point plan to bolster one of the UK's fastest growing sectors."

(Hasan Bakhshi, Ian Hargreaves and Juan Mateos–Garcia, April 2013, NESTA)

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TAGS

2013 • advanced manufacturing • Asiabusiness models • business uncertainty • constructioncreative businessescreative economycreative industriescreative services innovation • creative workforce • digital technologiesdisruptive innovationeconomic growthentrepreneurshipfinancial services • Hasan Bakhshi • hi-tech start-up • Ian Hargreaves • innovation in the UKjobs • Juan Mateos-Garcia • knowledge-based economymanifestomentoringmentoring schemeNESTA • new business • new internet markets • North Americaopen innovationpolicy makerspublic services • Rachel Grant • social innovationtechnology innovationUKUK innovationventure capitalworkforce • young companies

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
25 MARCH 2012

Business incubator: newSplash Communication Design Studio

"The newSplash studio bridges the gap between design education and the workforce by employing students and graduate designers from the Otago Polytechnic in our real–life studio. Then we connect them with you!"

(Otago Polytechnic, Aotearoa New Zealand)

Fig.1 Video showing samples of the film work created by newSplash Communication Design Studio, which is located at Otago Polytechnic.

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TAGS

Aotearoa New Zealandbrokerbrokeragebusiness incubatorcareercommercialisationcommissioningcreative industriesdesign businessdesign educationdesign studioDunedin • employing • employment agentemployment broker • facilitator • freelancegaining employmentgraduate bridgegraduate designers • graduate entrepreneur • incubator • incubator for graduate entrepreneurs • industry realitiesjob opportunitiesjobsnetworking • newSplash Communication Design Studio • newSplash Studio • on commission • Otago Polytechnic • outsourcepost-graduate employmentpost-graduate schemeproject bidreal-life studioSouth Islandstudents • transactions • transition into and through universitytransition into post-graduate employmentwork placementworkforce

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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