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Which clippings match 'Global Financial Market' keyword pg.1 of 1
07 JULY 2012

Neoliberal whizz-kid: Aotearoa New Zealand PM John Key in 1987

"A 1987 video has been unearthed featuring a 25–year–old squash–playing, accountancy graduate John Key. The bright–eyed Mr Key features in an early Close–Up story called Big Dealers. The 'portrait of 80s job du jour: foreign exchange dealer', shows the now Prime Minister in 'the pit' (trading room) as a senior forex dealer. 'Forex dealing is a work hard, play hard world with an image of rich brats who wreck restaurants but always somewhere else,' says the reporter. 'I am not denying that, that has happened and I guess that will happen again in the future but I personally perform in that way,' Mr Key responded."

(Deanna Harris, 02 Sep 2010, MediaWorks TV)

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TAGS

1980s1987 • 3 News • accountancy graduate • Aotearoa New Zealand • Big Dealers (television) • bright-eyed • businesscapital accumulationcapitalismChristchurch • Close-Up (television) • economyfinance • finance industry • financial dealingfinancial flowsfinancial gainfinancial innovationfinancial markets • financial risk • financial transactionsfinancing • foreign exchange • foreign exchange dealer • foreign exchange dealers • forex dealer • forex dealing • free market economyglobal capital flowsglobal financial marketJohn Keylifestyle • MediaWorks TV • money making • neoliberalismNew Zealand on Screen • NZ News • personal financial gain • Prime Ministerprofitrich bratriskrisk-takingsocial conservatism • squash-playing • stock marketstocks • trading room • TV3unit of capital accumulation • whizz-kid • winning • young upwardly-mobile professional • young urban professional • yuppie

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
12 MARCH 2009

Private companies are taking responsibility for a growing proportion of post-secondary learning

"For the youngster entering the workforce, work equals learning equals work. Because the new economy is knowledge–based and learning is part of day–to–day economic activity and life, the firm becomes a school in order to compete.

Evidence for this is articulated in the little known but very stimulating book The Monster Under the Bed by Stan Davis and Jim Botkin. The book argues that education, once the province of the church, then the government, is increasingly falling to business since it is business that ends up having to train knowledge workers. Say Davis and Botkin, 'With the move from an agrarian to an industrial economy, the small rural schoolhouse was supplanted by the big brick urban schoolhouse. Four decades ago we began to move to another economy, but we have yet to develop a new educational paradigm, let alone create the 'schoolhouse' of the future, which may be neither school nor house.'"
(Don Tapscott, Policy Options, July–August 1998)

TAGS

1998churchDon Tapscotteducationglobal financial market • Jim Botkin • knowledge workerlearningnew economypedagogypost-secondaryschool • schoolhouse • social change • Stan Davis • teachingtraininguniversityworkforce

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
25 FEBRUARY 2005

Castells: The Network Society And The Business Project

"The unit of this production process is not the firm, but the business project. The firm continues to be the legal unit of capital accumulation. But since the value of the firm ultimately depends on its valuation in the stock market, the unit of capital accumulation (the firm) itself becomes a node in a global network of financial flows. In this economy, the dominant layer is the global financial market, where all earnings from all activities and countries end up being traded. This global financial market works only partly according to market rules. It is shaped and moved by information turbulences of various origins, processed and transmitted almost instantly by telecommunicated, information systems, in the absence of the institutional regulation of global capital flows."

(Manuel Castells, p.9)

[2]. Castells, M. (2000). Materials For An Exploratory Theory Of The Network Society. London, British Journal of Sociology www.tandf.co.uk/journals.

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