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Which clippings match 'Knowledge Communities' keyword pg.1 of 1
06 NOVEMBER 2012

Open Courses are upending the higher education paradigm

"Open Courses will definitively shift the power from content to community in Higher Learning. The second coming of knowledge is firmly associated with free connections, inquiry and conversations, something that textbooks implicitly discourage. Textbooks, for all they stand for, are the industrial age contraptions that dominated learning for most of last fifty years; Open courses bring a much needed, paradigm shifting update.

In summary, then, Open Courses are eating the publishers' lunch, and that's where the resentment comes from. These masters of the learning universe already had enough trouble with the culture of Internet, and Open Courses represent everything they feared: the communities, the conversations and the knowledge commons. This isn't a battle which is over yet, but we may just be witnessing a passing of an age."

(Supriyo Chaudhuri, 05 November 2012)

TAGS

2012connectivismcredentialism • credentials or access • diploma mill • free connections • from content to community • game-changer • higher learningindustrial ageindustrial revolutioninternet cultureknowledge commonsknowledge communitiesknowledge conversations • learning conversations • learning networksMOOCsnew business models • open courses • open courseware • open education • paradigm shiftpedagogic recontextualising fieldpolitical legitimacy • power shift • PRF • privileged access • publisher and the profit • publishing revenues • sale of print • Supriyo Chaudhuri • textbook publishers • textbooksuniversities

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
22 MAY 2011

Universities provide access to communities of scholars and testimony for a student's experience among these communities

"Central to higher education is the way universities provide access to communities of scholars and testimony for a student's experience among these communities. Consequently, universities should explore resources for bringing people together, not, as some interpretations of 'distance education' suggest, for reinforcing their isolation."

(John Seely Brown and Paul Duguid, 1995, p.4)

1). Brown, J. S. and P. Duguid (1996). The University in the Digital Age. Times Higher Education Supplement (THES). London: 1–4.

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
03 NOVEMBER 2010

Clay Shirky: How cognitive surplus will change the world

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TAGS

amateur cultural productionauthorshipClay Shirky • cognitive surplus • collaborationcooperation • cooperative world • design and curiosity • digital cultureeconomic change • electoral fraud • engagement • Haiti • innovationinteractionknowledge communitiesLOLcats • online work • organisationsshare • social constraints • social constructionismsocial interactionTED Talks • Ushahidi • Wikipedia

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
12 MARCH 2009

Transnational Anime Fandoms and Amateur Cultural Production

"The goal of this study is to construct a series of ethnographic case studies of the activities of English–language fandoms of Japan–origin media, particularly anime (animation) and related media such as electronic games, trading cards, and manga (comics). Building on Ito's prior research on children's engagement with new media in Tokyo, this study adds a transnational dimension, focusing on how English–language fans translate, subtitle, share, and remix Japan–origin media. The project aims for a broad ethnographic description of the diverse range of fan activities that comprise anime fandom, focused on the US and English–language online sites. These sites and activities include anime clubs, anime and game conventions, fan subtitling groups, online 'shrine' sites dedicated to particular characters or series, anime news and discussion sites, file sharing sites, internet relay chat, anime music videos, fan art, and fan fiction.

Anime fandoms and transnational otaku groups represent a unique case study in youth activism and remix cultures, providing examples of creativity and social mobilization as ignited by passion for particular forms of cult media. Anime fans have constructed a grass roots movement to make Japan–origin media available to an English–speaking public. Further, they construct derivative works of fan art, video, and fiction that represent emergent forms of communication and creativity keyed to the digital age. These networks of amateur cultural production exhibit unique forms of learning, sharing, and reputation systems that can inform our understanding of how digital media can facilitate lateral and peer–to–peer knowledge communities."
(Mimi Ito, Brendan Callum, Renee Saito, Annie Manion, Rachel Cody, Ryan Shaw, Jennifer Urban)

[Illustration created by 'usagijen' of 'DNAngel Riku' published by scrumptious.animeblogger.net]

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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