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16 JANUARY 2015

Illustration showing 3D animation production pipeline

Pre–production: Idea, Story, Storyboard, Animatic, Design;
Production: Layout, R&D, Modelling, Texturing, Rigging/Setup, Animation, VFX, Lighting, Rendering;
Post–production: Compositing, 2D VFX/Motion Graphics, Colour Correction, Final Output.

Fig.1 John Ludwick (2011). "3D Production Pipeline".

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TAGS

Andy Beane • animation production • animation workflow • assembly linebunnyconveyer belt • design workflow • diagramillustrated diagrams • industrial process • industrial production systems • John Ludwick • linear sequence • manufacturing processespost-productionpost-production workflowpre-productionproduction line • production pipeline • production process • sequence of events • storyboardworkflow

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
30 JANUARY 2014

Lecture by curator, theorist and art critic Nicolas Bourriaud

Symposium: Other Perspectives. Hafnarhus, weekend 13 – 14 August 2011.

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TAGS

2011 • art and philosophy • contemporary artcritical position • cultural sphere • desensitisation • DJ • first modern age • identityideology • instrument realisation • Jacques LacanlocalLouis AlthusserMarcel Duchampmaterial processesmaterialismmaterialitymodernism • new maternity • Nicolas BourriaudPaolo Pasolinipersonal identityphilosophyPiet Mondrianpost-productionpostmodernism • providential man • psychoanalysis • rearticulation • reificationrelational aestheticsReykjavik • Reykjavik Art Museum • sexual fear • social needs • social unconscious • structuralismsymposiumvisual arts

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
11 DECEMBER 2013

Nicolas Bourriaud: Postproduction

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TAGS

amateur cultural productionartistsboundary-crossing • collective story • consumerismcontemporary artcritical discoursecultural and social relationscultural technology • culture of use • database as cultural formDIYDIY craftsDJforms • historised • Hunter College • Jerome Sans • Ludwig WittgensteinMarcel Duchamp • network on signs • new audio theory • new modes of production • newness • Nicky Enright • Nicolas Bourriaud • paths through culture • post • post-productionproduser • programme forms • protocols of usereinterpretationrelational aestheticsremix culturesamplerscriptible • site of navigation • social and cultural forms • sociality • tabula rasa • the new • theory of substantial formstoolsusevisual artwork of art • zone of activity

CONTRIBUTOR

Liam Birtles
16 SEPTEMBER 2013

How to deal with the demands of the rapidly evolving new technology and yet further the aesthetics of our filmic art?

"With digital capture and even digital intermediates, it becomes very easy to think of the image in the simplest of terms: contrast, saturation and color bias. But I think too often we forget about texture and sharpness. Film has organic grain texture that simply doesn't exist in digital cinematography. I'm not a film 'purist' but I think it's safe to say that with the advent of radical advances in digital cinema technology there has been a certain homogenization of the cinematographic image in regard to look and texture. It is common to shoot for an evenly distributed rich digital negative (protect the highlights, see into the shadows) with plenty of sharpness to endure the color correction suite and create the look in post. Everybody shoots the sensor the same way.

Painting is a great influence on me. Whenever I can I go to museums and look at the classics, the Dutch masters, Rembrandt and Georges de la Tour. Looking at these old paintings can be inspiring. These are the basics for cameramen because we can learn lighting from them. We can study the classic paintings and try to use that technique of lighting in our photography. I have lots of picture books at home–photography books and art books. When we did McCabe and Mrs. Miller, I showed a book of Andrew Wyeth's paintings to Bob Altman and said, 'What do you think of these faded, soft, pastel images?' And he liked it. Then I took the same book to the lab and explained to them that this was what we were aiming for. They understood right away why we were flashing the film. So it helps; a picture is worth ten thousand words. A picture can immediately tell you your feelings about something.

With digital capture, we have been given a completely different set of tools, trading physical lab processes for computer–driven non–destructive techniques, creating possibilities for the image to be pushed any way we wish in post. In a time when film is disappearing fast and digital is making progress in image quality improvement, it has become important for cinematographers to master these new tools."

(Vilmos Zsigmond ASC HSC, IMAGO European Federation of Cinematographers)

TAGS

aesthetics • American Society of Cinematgraphers (ASC) • Andrew Wyeth • ARRI Alexas • art of colour • available lightcamera technologycinematographycolour • colour bias • colour correctioncolour saturation • colourist • computer-driven techniques • digital capturedigital cinema technologydigital cinematography • digital intermediates • digital negativedigital picturesdigital progressdigital technology • European Federation of Cinematographers • faded images • film grain • film grain texture • film lighting • filmic art • filmmaking • Georges de La Tour • GoProimage contrast • image highlights • image manipulation • image quality • image shadows • image sharpness • image tone • IMAGO European Federation of Cinematographers • iPhone cinematographyKodak Eastman • lab process • light exposure • look and texture • low lightmaking process • McCabe and Mrs Miller (1971) • mobile video productionnew technology • non-destructive techniques • organic grain texture • painting with light • pastel colours • post-productionpre-productionrapid technological changeRED ONERembrandt van Rijn • retraining • Robert Altman • soft image quality • Sony camerataste (sociology) • taste cultivation • taste formations • Vilmos Zsigmond • visual compositionvisual representation • visual richness • visual sensibilityvisual storytelling • visual texture

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
23 MAY 2013

Video post-production workflow for 5D Mark III RAW footage in OSX

"You have probably seen our extensive written guide on how to get Magic Lantern's 24p working on the 5D Mark III, which also includes a step–by–step instruction on how to end up with usable ProRes 4444 files.

Well, as it turns out, Sebastian here has found a much more straightforward way to post process the raw files from the 5D Mark III which allows us to skip the relatively cumbersome After Effects conversion process. This new process only utilizes Adobe Photoshop's raw import module, which allows batch processing of files (which is necessary to apply the same settings onto an entire clip consisting of individual DNG files).

Watch our video with a step–by–step instruction on how to end up with editable post–processed files!"

(Nino Leitner, 16 May 2013, cinema5D)

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TAGS

24pAdobe PhotoshopAfter Effectsbatch processingCanon EOS 5D mark IIIcolour correctioncolour gradingdigital cinematographydigital filmmakingDNGfile conversion processfilm exposure • image compression • image qualityMagic Lantern (software)OSXpost-processingpost-productionpost-production workflow • ProRes 4444 • QuickTimeRAW • RAW footage • raw import module • step-by-step instructionsTIFF • TIFF sequence • video imagevideo post-production • video post-production workflow • video processingworkflow

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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