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Which clippings match 'Data Protection' keyword pg.1 of 1
05 DECEMBER 2016

Towards data justice? The ambiguity of anti-surveillance resistance in political activism

"The Snowden leaks, first published in June 2013, provided unprecedented insights into the operations of state-corporate surveillance, highlighting the extent to which everyday communication is integrated into an extensive regime of control that relies on the 'datafication' of social life. Whilst such data-driven forms of governance have significant implications for citizenship and society, resistance to surveillance in the wake of the Snowden leaks has predominantly centred on techno-legal responses relating to the development and use of encryption and policy advocacy around privacy and data protection. Based on in-depth interviews with a range of social justice activists, we argue that there is a significant level of ambiguity around this kind of anti-surveillance resistance in relation to broader activist practices, and critical responses to the Snowden leaks have been confined within particular expert communities. Introducing the notion of 'data justice', we therefore go on to make the case that resistance to surveillance needs to be (re)conceptualized on terms that can address the implications of this data-driven form of governance in relation to broader social justice agendas. Such an approach is needed, we suggest, in light of a shift to surveillance capitalism in which the collection, use and analysis of our data increasingly comes to shape the opportunities and possibilities available to us and the kind of society we live in."

(Lina Dencik, Arne Hintz and Jonathan Cable, 2016)

TAGS

2016activist practices • anti-surveillance resistance • Arne Hintz • big data • collection and processing of data • critical responses • Danielle Citron • data collection • data collection and retention • data encryption • data justice • data processes • data protectiondata security • data tracking • data-driven form of governance • data-driven forms of governance • datafication • datafication of social life • David Lyon • Edward Snowden • everyday communication • Frank Pasquale • individual rights • John Sylvia IV • Jonathan Cable • Lina Dencik • Miriyam Aouragh • Natasha Dow • personal data • policy advocacy • political activism • politics of data-driven processes • privacy • privacy and the protection of personal data • profiling • protection of personal data • regime of control • resistance to surveillance • retention of informationsocial justice • social justice activists • social justice agendas • social life • societal implications of data collection • state-corporate surveillance • surveillance • techno-legal responses

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
15 APRIL 2012

The UK Digital Curation Centre

"Creation of a Digital Curation Centre (DCC) was a key recommendation in the JISC Continuing Access and Digital Preservation Strategy, which argued for the establishment of a national centre for solving challenges in digital curation that could not be tackled by any single institution or discipline.

Its remit would also include the provision of generic services, some development activity and research."

(The Digital Curation Centre)

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TAGS

2004 • building capacity • consultancy and support • curationdata • data custodians • data management • data management planning • data protectiondata sharing • data storage • DCC • digital curation • Digital Curation Centre (DCC) • digital information • digital information curation • Digital Preservation Strategy • digital research data • expert advice • generic services • HEhigher education • higher education research community • how-to guidesinformation managementJISCJoint Information Systems Committee • manage and share • online services • policy development • practical help • research community • research data • researchersresources • training programme • UKUniversity of BathUniversity of EdinburghUniversity of Glasgow

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
30 MAY 2010

Google Street View Cars Peep Your Wi-Fi

"Nine days ago the data protection authority (DPA) in Hamburg, Germany asked to audit the WiFi data that our Street View cars collect for use in location–based products like Google Maps for mobile, which enables people to find local restaurants or get directions. His request prompted us to re–examine everything we have been collecting, and during our review we discovered that a statement made in a blog post on April 27 was incorrect.

In that blog post, and in a technical note sent to data protection authorities the same day, we said that while Google did collect publicly broadcast SSID information (the WiFi network name) and MAC addresses (the unique number given to a device like a WiFi router) using Street View cars, we did not collect payload data (information sent over the network). But it's now clear that we have been mistakenly collecting samples of payload data from open (i.e. non–password–protected) WiFi networks, even though we never used that data in any Google products.

However, we will typically have collected only fragments of payload data because: our cars are on the move; someone would need to be using the network as a car passed by; and our in–car WiFi equipment automatically changes channels roughly five times a second. In addition, we did not collect information traveling over secure, password–protected WiFi networks."

(Google, 14/05/2010 01:44:00 PM)

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
24 MARCH 2009

National Identity Register: Data Protection

"Mr. Woolas: There is no single departmental database in the Home Office. If the Home Office is sharing personal information, including across Government, it needs to have a legal power to do so and it needs to be a lawful exercise of that power. The Home Office therefore needs to comply with the Data Protection Act 1998 when sharing personal information.

While consent is one of a number of conditions that can be relied on for data sharing to be considered fair and lawful under that Act, it is not the only condition, therefore the sharing of personal information can take place without the individual's consent. However, if consent is being relied on to enable the data sharing to take place, an individual has the right to withdraw that consent. If consent is withdrawn and there is no other basis for the sharing then it would stop."
(House of Commons Hansard Written Answers for 25 Feb 2009, pt 0023)

TAGS

datadata protection • Data Protection Act 1998 • data sharingdatabaseLords Hansard • National Identity Register • Phil Woolas • sharing personal informationUK • UK Home Office

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
28 FEBRUARY 2009

Facebook opens up with 'bill of rights'

"Social network has decided to stem off future criticism by putting some changes to public vote and asking users to sign simplified 'bill of rights'

Faced with a user revolt over changes to its terms of service, social networking site Facebook has decided to take the nuclear option: open itself up to public scrutiny.

In future, the site has announced, proposals to change its terms of service will be circulated to users in order to get feedback. Some may go to a public vote, while it also said that its legal contract with Facebook addicts will be simplified into a 'bill of rights and responsibilities'.

The document, said founder Mark Zuckerberg, is 'not just what people must do when they're on the site... it's also what Facebook must do.'"

TAGS

2009 • bill of rights • communitydata protectiondemocracyempowermentethicsFacebookMark Zuckerbergsocial networkingtechnology

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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