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Which clippings match 'Corporate Responsibility' keyword pg.1 of 1
21 JUNE 2015

The Next Black: a film about the future of clothing

"People say that fashion moves faster and faster. More colours, more collections, more brands, more styles. But in reality the clothing industry has been crawling, in terms of innovation, for the last hundred years. Up until now. For the first time in history, the concept of clothing is about to change. And it’s our mission to explore it.

This film is not about the new, it’s about the next. Will mass consumption of clothing continue to escalate? Or will we return to creating quality and caring about what we wear?

Will the future be centred around smart clothing and new technologies? Or will we find innovation within organic and traditional methods? We meet with some of the world’s most progressive people in search of the answers.

The Next Black is produced by home appliance manufacturer AEG, with the goal to anticipate future washing needs and contribute in making the clothing industry more sustainable."

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TAGS

20143D printingAdidas • AEG • Arcade Fireart of recycling • Biocouture Ltd • Black Eyed Peas • climate change • clothes dye • clothing and accessories • clothing design • clothing industry • clothing technologyCoco Chanelcorporate responsibilitycutting-edge innovations • cutting-edge technology • design engineeringdesign responsibilitydocumentary filmdye • dye chemicals • environmental initiatives • fashion future • fashion industry • fashion meets technology • fashion techology • fast fashion • future of clothing • heroes of sustainability • House of Radon • incentivising recycling • individual responsibilityinnovative companies • Lady Gaga • laundry care • manufacturing industries • Matt Hymers • MiCoach Team Elite • Nancy Tilbury • new technologies • organic materials • Patagonia • performance tracking • physiological • real-time data • Rick Ridgeway • slow fashion • smart designsmart materials • Sophie Mather • speculative fashion • sportswear manufacturing • sportwear design • Studio XO • sustainable companies • sustainable consumptionsustainable fashionsustainable future • sustainable practices • Suzanne Lee • Team Elite System • textiles industry • The Next Black (2014) • wearable technologies • woven sensors • woven textiles • Yeh Group

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
28 OCTOBER 2012

ACID: Anti Copying In Design

"ACID (Anti Copying In Design) is a membership trade organisation, set up as a round table action group in 1996, by designers for designers. ACID is a committed to raising awareness & encouraging respect for IP within individual & corporate responsibility. By helping its members to understand and protect their rights, ACID is intent on stamping out intellectual property rights abuse."

(Anti Copying In Design, UK)

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TAGS

1996 • ACID (acronym) • advice and mediation • All Party Group on Design and Innovation • Alliance for Intellectual Property • Anti Copying in Design • British Confederation of Furniture • corporate responsibilitycreative industriesdesign community • design equity • design protection • designers for designers • individual responsibilityintellectual propertyintellectual property rights • intellectual property rights abuse • intellectual property theft • IP • IP rights • raising awareness • rights infringement • round table action group • stealing ideas • strong deterrent • theft • trade enforcement • trade organisation • trading environment • UK

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
26 FEBRUARY 2009

Is print really dirtier than online?

"When it comes to the environmental impact of communication media, print is usually singled out as the dirty old man, writes Barney Cox in 'Foot prints', Eye no.70. vol. 18. It is understandable why that should be. In the shiny, weightless online world, everything happens in the twinkling of an eye and it is possible to instantly view a Web page or email created on the other side of the world. With the rise of the iPhone, Wifi and 3G dongles, this viewing can be anywhere, as long as you have battery life and a few bars of signal.

The technology is easy to use–and makes it easy to forget that there is a huge infrastructure humming away behind the scenes. Factories have to produce the laptops, smartphones and flat panel displays that are the windows to this electronic world; and communications networks and data centres need to be powered 24 / 7 to allow us the convenience of access any time, any place, anywhere. Jonathan Koomey of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in California has calculated that the data centres that drive the internet already consume one per cent of global electricity capacity, and that their consumption is growing at seventeen per cent per year (New Scientist, 4 October 2008).

By contrast, the physicality of the printed page shows rather than hides the resources that went into providing the paper that supports the design. Every time we turn the page of a magazine or pick up a book, it reminds us of the raw materials and energy that have gone into its production.

Earlier this year, Sainsbury's, the UK supermarket chain, announced its decision to distribute its report and accounts in electronic form only, claiming environmental reasons. Michael Johnson, president of the British Print Industries Federation (BPIF), decried the move as a 'phoney' attempt to cover up a cost–cutting exercise. Johnson said: 'The paper industry is one of the great success stories of modern recycling. Paper is not the enemy of the environment it is made out to be.' Sainsbury's, however, defended its decision as being 'in keeping with our corporate responsibility principle of 'respect for our environment'.'"
(Barney Cox, 25 February, 2009)

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CONTRIBUTOR

Shaun Belcher
21 JUNE 2005

The Corporation: provocative account charting the evolution and powerful influence of the contemporary business corporation

"Provoking, witty, stylish and sweepingly informative, THE CORPORATION explores the nature and spectacular rise of the dominant institution of our time. Part film and part movement, The Corporation is transforming audiences and dazzling critics with its insightful and compelling analysis. Taking its status as a legal 'person' to the logical conclusion, the film puts the corporation on the psychiatrist's couch to ask 'What kind of person is it?'"

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TAGS

1886 • 2003 • bad apples • Bolivia • Bovine Growth Hormone • Bovine Somatotropin • businessCanadacapitalismCelebration (city) • Charles Kernaghan • Coca-Cola • commercial institution • contemporary business • corporate Americacorporate behaviourcorporate historycorporate modelcorporate responsibility • corporate social responsibility • corporationscritical perspective • dairy cattle • DDT (dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane) • developmental vulnerability • documentary filmDwight Eisenhower • economic externalities • economyexploitationexploitation of natural resources • Fanta • financial dealingfinancial innovationFox News • Fraser Institute • free market economy • government-chartered institution • Howard Zinn • IBM • intergenerational tyranny • investigative news • Jennifer Abbott • Joel Bakan • legal entity • limited liability • Mark Achbar • Mark Moody-Stuart • marketing practices • mastitis • Michael Moore • Michael Walker • military-industrial complex • milk • milk production • Milton Friedman • Monsanto • Monsanto Company • nagging • Naomi KleinNaziNikeNoam ChomskyNorth Americapatent registration • perception management • Peter Drucker • petrochemicals • Pfizer • posilac • powerprofit • rational tyranny • Ray Anderson • Robert Hare • Samuel Epstein • stealth marketing • The Corporation (2003) • toxicology • tragedy of the commons • undercover marketing • unethical behaviourUnited StatesUniversity of British ColumbiaVandana Shiva
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