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Which clippings match 'Packaging Design' keyword pg.1 of 1
20 NOVEMBER 2013

Own Label Sainsbury's Design Studio 1962-1977

"In 1962, when Peter Dixon joined the Sainsbury's Design Studio, a remarkable revolution in packaging design began. The supermarket was developing its distinctive range of Own Label products, and Dixon's designs for the line were revolutionary: simple, stripped down, creative, and completely different from what had gone before. Their striking modernity pushed the boundaries, reflecting a period full of optimism. They also helped build Sainsbury's into a brand giant, the first real 'super' market of the time. This book examines and celebrates this paradigm shift that redefined packaging design, and led to the creation of some of the most original packaging ever seen.

Produced in collaboration with the Sainsbury family and The Sainsbury Archive, the book reveals an astonishing and exhaustive body of work. A unique insight into what and how we ate, the packaging is presented using both scanned original flat packets and photographic records made at the time. With an essay by Emily King featuring interviews with Peter Dixon and Lord Sainsbury of Preston Candover."

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TAGS

1960s19621970sbrandBritish designcolour fielddesign aestheticsdesign simplicitydesign studio • Emily King • food labelformalist design aesthetics • FUEL (design group) • graphic designgraphic design collectiongraphic design historyinformation design • John Sainsbury • labelmodernist aestheticsmodernity • Own Label (book) • packagingpackaging design • packets • Peter Dixon • photographic records • plain packproduct packagingSainsburys • Sainsburys Design Studio • Sainsburys Own Label • simple design • stripped down • supermarket • The Sainsbury Archive • UK

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
23 JANUARY 2013

The Roses Student Awards: UK UG graphic design competition

"The Roses Student Awards is a platform for students to get agencies attention! The awards recognise fresh and original work representative of the next design generation. Roses Student provides the opportunity to get undergraduate work infront a first class judging panel. Is there a diamond among the rough? 10 agencies, 10 judges, 10 chances. Who will make the cut!? ...

The Roses Student Awards deadline 15th Feb 2013. The work will be judged 14th March with the winners being revealed on the night in a networking party at Islington Mill, Salford."

(Roses Student Awards)

Fig.1 2012 winner Abigail Burch (Nottingham Trent University) Brief 1. "Alternative Therapy: Tayburn".

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ad campaign • brand it • brand refreshcorporate identitycreativitydesign agenciesdesign awardsdesign briefdesign competition • design pitch • diamond among the rough • digital campaign • direct mail • graphic designindustry placementIslington Mill • judging panel • juried design competition • live project • logo designmarketingnext design generationpackaging design • point of sale • postersre-brand • Roses Student Awards • Salford • social media marketing campaign • student design competition • student workstudents • tag-line • the messagetv advertUKundergraduate students • undergraduate work • website design

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
01 OCTOBER 2012

Legal issues: intellectual property rights for the design industry

"Intellectual property law is made up of many elements of legal protection and a business might be concerned with any number of them. In some cases, IP ownership and its associated protection is inherent in the creation of the work and does not necessarily require further registration. Copyright is one example, which typically applies to 'artistic' works, such as books, music, software code and graphics. In other types, such as patents, registration is required. The tricky aspect is that any given design may qualify for one or more of the different intellectual property rights. Graphic design for a book, for example, would qualify for copyright, whilst the graphic elements of product packaging–such as the colours, lines or contours – might qualify for a 'registered design right', which is a different thing. The main types of intellectual property rights are: patents, copyright, unregistered design right, registered design right, trademarks."

(Design Council, UK)

TAGS

Anti Copying in Design • artistic works • book designbooksbusinesscopyright • creation of the work • Design Council (UK)graphic design • graphic elements • graphicsguide • guides for designers • intellectual propertyintellectual property lawintellectual property rights • IP ownership • lawlegallegal issues • legal protection • musicownershippackaging designpatent registrationpatentsprotection • registered design right • software codetrademarktrademarksUK • unregistered design right

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
30 MARCH 2012

Repo Man: generic packaging in a plain pack world

"Clark Collins definition of Repo Man as an 'hilarious genre–hopping indictment of consumerism in which, for example, all cans of drink in the supermarket are labelled simply 'drink'' (Collins 2001: 36)"

(Nicholas Rombes)

Nicholas Rombes (2005). New Punk Cinema, Edinburgh University Press.

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1980s1984 • Alex Cox • alienanti-consumeristapocalyptic • apocalyptic cynicism • b-movieblack humour • Blair Witch Project • blue text • cans of drink • Chevrolet Malibu • Chevy Malibu • consumableconsumerismconsumptioncoolcounterculturecult moviecynicismdesign conceit • disenfranchised • drink • Emilio Estevez • filmfilm genre • Flipper (band) • food label • generic • generic brand • generically • grocery store • Gummo • humour • indictment of consumerism • labellow budget • memento • new wave • Otto (character) • packagingpackaging design • plain • plain pack • plain white • product packagingproduct placementpunkpunk rockpunk rock ethosrebellion • Repo Man (1984) • Requiem for a Dream (2000) • Ronald Reagan • Run Lola Run (1998) • shoppingsubculturesupermarket • The Celebration • Timecode (2000)

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
25 FEBRUARY 2009

Behance Network member: Glenn Jones

"freelance graphic designer and illustrator based in Auckland, New Zealand. I've worked in the design industry for over 15 years concentrating on packaging and corporate identity. After some success designing tees on Threadless.com I've now decided to focus on my illustration and my own T–shirt website glennz.com"
(Glenn Jones)

[Playful commentary through manipulating familiar cultural codes.]

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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