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Which clippings match 'Design Process' keyword pg.1 of 7
14 SEPTEMBER 2015

Design for Action: designing the immaterial artefact

"Throughout most of history, design was a process applied to physical objects. Raymond Loewy designed trains. Frank Lloyd Wright designed houses. Charles Eames designed furniture. Coco Chanel designed haute couture. Paul Rand designed logos. David Kelley designed products, including (most famously) the mouse for the Apple computer.

But as it became clear that smart, effective design was behind the success of many commercial goods, companies began employing it in more and more contexts. High-tech firms that hired designers to work on hardware (to, say, come up with the shape and layout of a smartphone) began asking them to create the look and feel of user-interface software. Then designers were asked to help improve user experiences. Soon firms were treating corporate strategy making as an exercise in design. Today design is even applied to helping multiple stakeholders and organizations work better as a system.

This is the classic path of intellectual progress. Each design process is more complicated and sophisticated than the one before it. Each was enabled by learning from the preceding stage. Designers could easily turn their minds to graphical user interfaces for software because they had experience designing the hardware on which the applications would run. Having crafted better experiences for computer users, designers could readily take on nondigital experiences, like patients' hospital visits. And once they learned how to redesign the user experience in a single organization, they were more prepared to tackle the holistic experience in a system of organizations."

(Tim Brown and Roger Martin, 2015, Harvard Business Review)

A version of this article appeared in the September 2015 issue (pp.56–64) of Harvard Business Review.

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Bill BuxtonCharles EamesCoco Chanelcomplex systems • David Kelley • design history • design intervention • design processdesign thinking • design-oriented approach • design-oriented thinkingdesigned artefactethnographic design approachFrank Lloyd Wright • genuinely innovative strategies • graphical user interfaceHarvard Business ReviewHerbert Simon • holistic user experience • IDEOimmateriality • intervention design • iPoditerative prototyping • iterative rapid-cycle prototyping • iTunes Store • Jeff Hawkins • look and feellow-fidelity prototype • low-resolution prototype • nondigital experiences • PalmPilot • Paul Randpersonal digital assistantphysical objectsrapid prototyping • Raymond Loewy • redesignRichard Buchananrole of the designerservice designuser experienceuser experience designuser feedbackuser interface designwicked problems

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
22 DECEMBER 2014

BBC Footballers United WWI interactive drama

"I undertook the interaction design of the project on behalf of 100 Shapes. I worked with the visual designer to develop and refine the concept over several months, informed by feedback from the clients, producer and developers. In designing this piece we overcame unique creative challenges, including revealing the wealth of supporting content and archive material within the context of the linear drama to allow viewers to follow a a different journey to explore the deeper human narrative."

(Suzie Blackman, November 2014)

[A discussion about he design process of creating BBC History's interactive drama entitled Footballers United (2014), which was produced by Somethin' Else and 100 Shapes (who produced the website and interactive features). ]

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100 Shapes (agency) • 2014audience interactionBBC History • BBC World War One centenary season • creative challenges • creative lead • cue sheet • design for the screendesign processdigital agency • digital products • football teamFootballers United (2014) • graphing technique • interaction designinteraction designerinteractive dramainteractive featuresinteractive mediainteractive timeline • page schematic • page-plan • Prix Italia • screen blueprint • Somethin Else (agency) • Suzie Blackman • user experience design • user experience designer • UX designer • website wireframe • went to war • wireframe • wireframing • women designers

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
16 DECEMBER 2014

Breathing Friend: stress relief ball by Czech industrial design student

Diploma Work created by industrial design student Kateřina Pražáková at the Czech Technical University, Prague in 2014.

"Tento malý přítel je určen jako dárek pro ženy trpící stresem. Může se pro nás stát blízkým tak jako hračka v dětství či pouze nástrojem, který nás nenásilnou formou dokáže uklidnit. Povrch si každý může vytvořit sám podle svých sympatií a tím se stává osobnější. Při uchopení tohoto křehkého dýchajícího stvoření můžeme příjemně relaxovat a na chvíli zapomenout na chaos kolem nás. Díky svojí velikosti jej můžeme mít stále u sebe."

And as translated from Czech to English using Google Translate: "This little friend is designated as gift for women suffering from stress. It may become for us so close like a toy in childhood or just tool that nonviolent us form can soothe. Surface everyone can create by himself their sympathy and becomes personal. In this gripping brittle breathing creature we can relax and moment, forget the chaos around us."

(Kateřina Pražáková, 2014)

[The project set out to address the problem of everyday stress through creating a stress relief ball called Breathing Friend. In doing so various materials were considered because of their significance for the target user group. The project has an anthropomorphistic aspect through its use of subtle vibration and physical warmth.]

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2014animal resemblancesanthropomorphismanxietyArduinobioelectronics • Breathing Friend (project) • calming effect • chestnut • Czech Republic • Czech Technical University in Prague • design process • embryo • emotional involvementergonomic designhaptic interface • hemisphere • industrial design • Katerina Prazakova • lifelikemechanical animal • mechanical creature • Miroslav Macik • motherhoodnatural materials • neurohumoral response • palm • pebble • polyurethane foam • product design • psychological distress • psychological perception • purring • selection of materials • siliconesimulation • soothing • stress • stress ball • stress relief • student projectsubstratestoytraumavisceral • wadding • wellbeingwool

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
19 SEPTEMBER 2014

Agile Software Development: what we've learned at Forty

"The general idea behind Agile is that instead of arguing about the wording of a requirements document written three months earlier with little perspective into the current situation, it's often healthier to acknowledge that the project is going to be flexible and evolving, and put processes in place that allow it to be that way.

Barely over 200 words, that manifesto become the foundation for a movement that has changed the world of software development forever. Endless writing and speaking has explored the various ways the manifesto could be interpreted, and many specific frameworks and methodologies (such as Extreme Programming, Kanban, Lean, and Scrum) have been developed to formalize its principles. A whole 'Agile industry' has emerged, with successful companies offering tools, training, consulting, certification, and other products and services. The economic engine behind the Agile movement as a whole is massive. ...

On the surface, it seems like design and Agile should magically work together, but there are some underlying philosophical issues you have to wrestle with before figuring it out. Design is all about big–picture thinking: planning, strategy, working out all the details, thinking everything through, making it perfect, etc. (Eric Karjaluoto called it the 'masterpiece mentality.') Agile, on the other hand, is more often about doing the basics and saving details for later: iteration, minimum viable products, 'perfect is the enemy of done,' etc. Those two worlds don't blend smoothly together, at least at first. Agile developers can get frustrated with designers for over–thinking things ('Why can't they just let it go? We can get to that later.'), while the designers get discouraged by the perceived low standards of Agile developers ('Don't you want it to be good? Don't you want the user to be happy?').

In both cases, though, the problem comes from a misunderstanding of each other's perspectives (as problems often do). The designer isn't being obsessive, they're just trying to do right by the user. And the developer isn't being lazy, they're just following a process that actually gets things done with minimal navel–gazing. Both sides could learn some important lessons from each other."

(James Archer, Forty)

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agile development • agile model • agile modelling • agile software development • current situationdesign processdevelopment life cycle • development methodology • Eric Karjaluoto • evolving needseXtreme Programmingfacing unpredicted challengesflexible management methodology • flexible process • formalised principlesiterative approachiterative design processiterative developmentiterative processjust-in-time (JIT)Kanban • Lean (methodology) • management methodology • over-thinking • perfect is the enemy of done • requirements documents • saving details for later • scrum software development processsoftware developmentsoftware development methoduser experience design • UX design • waterfall modelwhirlpool model

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
21 OCTOBER 2013

Design briefing for SMEs

"Design briefs are an essential part of the design process. In fact, they mark the beginning of the design process, helping designers understand the business problem they are required to solve and businesses clarify what they need from a design project."

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businessbusiness analystbusiness consultant • business focused briefs • business problem • clear project objectivesdesign brief • design briefing • Design Council (UK)design processdesign projectdesign teamdomain expertexplicit objectivesexplicitly definedlingoPeter Phillipsproblem-oriented thinkingproblem-solvingproject definitionproject designproject goalsproject objectivesrequirements gathering • small and medium enterprise • small and medium-sized business • small company • SMB • SMETLAwriting a design brief

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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