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Which clippings match 'Sociology' keyword pg.1 of 6
08 OCTOBER 2017

Understanding through Pictures versus an Understanding about Pictures

"When developing qualitative methods for the interpretation of pictures, it seems to be important not to explain pictures by texts, but to differentiate them from texts. Nevertheless, it seems equally important to develop common standards or methodological devices which are relevant for the interpretation of texts, as well as for the interpretation of pictures. Examples of common standards are: to treat the text as well as the picture as a self-referential system, to differentiate between explicit and implicit (atheoretical) knowledge, to change the analytic stance from the question What to the question How, to reconstruct the formal structures of texts as well as pictures in order to integrate single elements into the over-all context, and—last but not least—to use comparative analysis. The application or realization of these common standards and methodological devices in the field of the interpretation of pictures, however, has to be quite different from that of the interpretation of texts, if we intend to advance to iconicity as a self-contained domain, to its inherent laws and to its autonomy independent from texts."

(Ralf Bohnsack, 2008)

Volume 9, No. 3, Art. 26 – September 2008, Forum Qualitative Sozialforschung / Forum: Qualitative Social Research.

TAGS

Alfred Schutz • analytic mentality • atheoretical knowledge • Bildlichkeit • Charles Goodwin • communicative knowledge • comparative analysis • conjunctive knowledge • conversational analysis • cultural phenomena • documentary meaning • Documentary Method of Interpretation • empirical social sciences • Erving Goffman • Erwin Panofsky • ethnomethodology • formal compositional structure • Forum Qualitative Social Research • Forum Qualitative Sozialforschung • FQS • Gottfried Boehm • Hans Belting • Harold GarfinkelHarvey Sacks • hyper-ritualization • iconic meaning • iconicityiconography • iconology • image-based understanding • immanent meaning • interpretative methods • Karl MannheimKarl Popper • linguistic turn • literal meaning • Martin Heidegger • Max Imdahl • meaning image-based depictions • Niklas Luhmann • Peter BergerPierre Bourdieuplanimetric composition • Praxeological Sociology of Knowledge • qualitative methodsqualitative research • Ralf Bohnsack • research practiceRoland Barthes • self-referential systems • semantic structure • semiotics • sequence analysis • simultaneitysocial phenomenasocial realitysociologysociology of knowledgetacit knowledge • text interpretation • theory of action • Thomas Luckmann • transcontrariness • typification • Umberto Ecovideo analysis • visible phenomena

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
11 JUNE 2016

Digital Sociology: Beyond the Digital to the Sociological

"Where sociologists differ from many other social researchers in researching digital media is their awareness that digital data, like any other type of data, are socially created and have a social life, a vitality, of their own. They are not the neutral products of automatic calculation, but represent deliberate decisions by those who formulate the computer algorithms that collect and manipulate these data (boyd and Crawford 2012; Cheney-Lippold 2011; Ruppert et al. 2013). The data that these devices and software produce structure our concepts of identity, embodiment, relationships, our choices and preferences and even our access to services or spaces. Without the knowledge of digital technology users, algorithms measure and sort them, deciding what choices they may be offered (Beer 2009, 2013a). Algorithms and other elements of software, therefore, are generative, a productive form of power (Lash 2007)."

(Deborah Lupton, 2013, p.4)

Deborah Lupton 'Digital Sociology: Beyond the Digital to the Sociological', Paper presented at The Australian Sociological Association 2013 Conference, Monash University, 27 November 2013.

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TAGS

2013 • algorithms • cultural concept of technologycultural practicescultural technologycultural understanding of technologyculture and societyDanah Boyd • David Beer • Deborah Lupton • digital data • digital media • digital sociology • digital technologyembodiment • Evelyn Ruppert • identity • John Cheney-Lippold • Kate Crawford • material culturemediated interactionMonash Universitynew mediaScott Lashsocial mediasocial policysocial researchsocial theorysociology • sociomateriality • software affordancestechnology practicesUniversity of Sydney

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
23 DECEMBER 2014

The virtual is a liminal space that consists only of its becomingness-state

"One of the simplest ways to conceptualize the becomingness of liminal space in media is to think of the virtual. In his essay 'The Reality of the Virtual,' Slavoj Žižek addresses Gilles Deleuze's notion of the virtual as 'pure becoming without being,' which is ''always forthcoming an already past,'' but is never present or corporeal.[7] The virtual is a liminal space that consists only of its becomingness–state, and not an actual being or object to become. It exists as pure becoming that suspends both 'sequentiality and directionality'; it is a passage, but there is no line of passage.[8]"

(Allison Wright, The Chicago School of Media Theory)

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TAGS

2004becoming • becoming without being • becomingness • beliefbelief systemsbeliefs • Ben Wright • democracydocumentary filmFather ChristmasGilles DeleuzeJacques Lacanliminalliminal spaceliminalitymedia theorypoliticspopular culture • post-political era • psychoanalysisSlavoj Zizek • Slovenian philosopher • sociology • universal truth • universalisingvideo lecturevirtual reality

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
26 MAY 2014

Michel Foucault's Biopolitics

"we can call 'biopolitics' the specific strategies and contestations over problematizations of collective human vitality, morbidity and mortality. Over the forms of knowledge, regimes of authority, and practices of intervention that are desirable, legitimate and efficacious."

(Paul Rabinow and Nikolas Rose, 12 October 2003)

TAGS

2003biopolitical power relationsbiopolitics • biopower • bipolar technology • birthbody • collective existence • conceptual clarification • genomic medicine • longevity • mechanisms of life • Michel Foucault • modes of subjectification • morbidity • mortality • political struggle • populationrace • regulatory controls • reproductionsexualitysociology • strategies for the governing of life • technologies of power • the character of living human beings • truth discourses

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
18 MAY 2014

Gabriel Tarde: The Laws of Imitation

TAGS

1903adaptation • beliefs and desires • biological conflict • changing environmentCharles Darwin • civic opinion • collective behaviour • creative associations • cultural innovations • diffusion of innovations • environmentally adaptive inventions • evolution of the species • extralogical factors • extralogical social factors • Francis GaltonGabriel Tarde • human innovation • imitation • intermental activity • international political • inventioninventiveness • mass communications • mass society theory • microsociologymorality • opposing ideas • opposing motivations • opposition • paths of imitation • pattern of activity • physical conflict • prestige hierarchy structures • psychological conflict • public opinion research • rational aspects of a culture • rational development • receptivity • social adjustments • social conflict • social consequencessocial interactionsocial invention • social patterns • social psychology • social system • social variables • societal change • sociologytechnical innovation • The Laws of Imitation

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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