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19 DECEMBER 2015

A History of the Studio-based Learning Model

"Studio-based instruction and learning has become a hot topic in K-12 education today. Knowing the origins of studio-based learning in education, as well as in art and architectural education can provide us with a deeper understanding of the purposes and goals of studio-based methods. Much can be gained by educators to the turn of the century for guidance in translating the new popular studio-based learning model developed in architectural education."

(Jeffery A. Lackney, 2 August 1999)

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19th century20th centuryactive learning • aesthetic training • apprentice system • architectural education • art and architectural education • art and design educationatelier modelBauhaus School • charrette • child-centred approach • Columbia University • David Hoff • design problemdesign studio education • design studio model • Donald Schon • Ecole des Beaux Arts • Ernest Boyer • Francis Parker • Friedrich Frobel • history of ideas and learning • Horace Mann • Horace Mann High School • Indiana • integrated curriculum • Jeffery Lackney • John DeweyK-12 • Laboratory School in Chicago • learner-centredlearning by doing • Lee Mitgang • Massachusetts • mastery • Mississippi State University • Parker School in Quincy • pedagogical model • platoon system • Quincy System • studio approach • studio-based instruction • studio-based learning • studio-based learning model • studio-based methods • studio-based model of learning • University of Oregon • William Wirt

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
19 MAY 2014

Defining features of practice-based and practice-led research

"Practice-based Research is an original investigation undertaken in order to gain new knowledge partly by means of practice and the outcomes of that practice. Claims of originality and contribution to knowledge may be demonstrated through creative outcomes which may include artefacts such as images, music, designs, models, digital media or other outcomes such as performances and exhibitions Whilst the significance and context of the claims are described in words, a full understanding can only be obtained with direct reference to those outcomes. A practice-based PhD is distinguishable from a conventional PhD because creative outcomes from the research process may be included in the submission for examination and the claim for an original contribution to the field are held to be demonstrated through the original creative work.

Practice-based doctoral submissions must include a substantial contextualisation of the creative work. This critical appraisal or analysis not only clarifies the basis of the claim for the originality and location of the original work, it also provides the basis for a judgement as to whether general scholarly requirements are met. This could be defined as judgement of the submission as a contribution to knowledge in the field, showing doctoral level powers of analysis and mastery of existing contextual knowledge, in a form that is accessible to and auditable by knowledgeable peers.

Practice-led Research is concerned with the nature of practice and leads to new knowledge that has operational significance for that practice. The main focus of the research is to advance knowledge about practice, or to advance knowledge within practice. In a doctoral thesis, the results of practice-led research may be fully described in text form without the inclusion of a creative outcome. The primary focus of the research is to advance knowledge about practice, or to advance knowledge within practice. Such research includes practice as an integral part of its method and often falls within the general area of action research. The doctoral theses that emerge from this type of practice related research are not the same as those that include artefacts and works as part of the submission."

(Creativity and Cognition Studios, University of Technology Sydney)

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action research • advance knowledge about practice • advance knowledge within practice • central practice element • contextual knowledge • contribution to knowledge • contribution to knowledge in the field • conventional PhD • creative artefact • creative artefacts • creative outcome • creative outcomes • creative work contextualisation • Creativity and Cognition Studios (CCS)critical analysis • critical appraisal • digital media practice • doctoral level analysis • doctoral submission • doctoral theses • doctoral thesis • exegesis • knowledge about practice • knowledgeable peers • mastery • nature of practice • new knowledge • new knowledge by means of practice • new understandings about practice • operational significance for that practice • original contribution to the field • original creative work • original investigation • original work • originalitypractice-basedpractice-based PhDspractice-based researchpractice-ledpractice-led researchresearch processresearch scholarship • research types • scholarly requirements • submission for examination • types of research • University of Technology Sydney

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
03 MARCH 2014

This American Life: Ira Glass on good taste and making good work

Kinetic type interpretation of "Ira Glass on Storytelling, part 3 of 4" by David Shiyang Liu.

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2009advice for studentsAfter Effects • artful elegance • beginners • craftsmanship • creative beginnings • creative potentialcreative skillscreative visioncreative work • encouragement • encouraging advice • expressive repertoiregood tasteindividual experience • Ira Glass • kinetic type • kinetic typographylong-term successmasterymotion graphicsmotion typeperseverance • personal ambition • personal taste • public radio • Public Radio International (PRI) • quit • radio production • radio show • sage advice • skilful masteryskill • skill-building • skilled behaviourskillful copingtaste (sociology) • This American Life (radio show) • visual interpretationwriting tips

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
26 FEBRUARY 2014

Life After Pi: a plea to change practices deemed unsustainable in the VFX industry

"In February of 2013, John Hughes, founder of Rhythm & Hues Studios, regretfully announced that the company was going bankrupt. With no way to pay his hard working employees, and no other options, hundreds were laid off. Two weeks later, they won the Academy Award for Best Visual Effects for 'Life of Pi.'

These were tragic, ironic times, and as employees, we were compelled to document it. As the bankruptcy finalized and layoffs continued, we began filming–watching helplessly as one of the most prestigious VFX companies in the world crumbled. As we all asked how this could happen, many stood up in outrage, sounding the alarm that this incident was not an isolated event, but a reflection of greater problems.

The old model of the movie business is passing away, yet modern–day Hollywood grips it ever more tightly. VFX companies and artists are treated as mere cogs in the machine, with little regard to creating a sustainable, collaborative working relationship. This will lead not only to the demise of more VFX companies, but to increasing instability industry wide.

Rhythm & Hues reached new heights in visual effects mastery with its stunning work on 'Life of Pi,' yet they still fell into bankruptcy.

'Life After Pi' reveals the behind–the–scenes factors that led to this sad and unforgettable moment in the history of Hollywood."

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2013Academy Award • bankruptcy • behind-the-scenesdesign industrydesign professionalsHollywood • John Hughes • Life of Pi (2012) • masterymovie business • production model • redundancy • Rhythm and Hues Studios • sounding the alarm • sustainable practicesustainable production practicestransforming workplaces • unsustainable pattern of production • unsustainable practices • VFXVFX industriesvisual effectsvisual effects industryworking practices of designers

CONTRIBUTOR

Jonathan Hearn
08 AUGUST 2012

PressPausePlay: does democratised culture mean better art, film, music and literature?

"The digital revolution of the last decade has unleashed creativity and talent of people in an unprecedented way, unleashing unlimited creative opportunities.

But does democratized culture mean better art, film, music and literature or is true talent instead flooded and drowned in the vast digital ocean of mass culture? Is it cultural democracy or mediocrity?

This is the question addressed by PressPausePlay, a documentary film containing interviews with some of the world's most influential creators of the digital era."

(House of Radon)

Fig.1 "PressPausePlay" (2011) [http://www.houseofradon.com/]

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2011 • Adam Watson • amateur cultural productionamateurism • Amy Phillips • Andre de Ridder • Andre Stringer • Andrew Keen • Anne Hilde Neset • Anthony Volodkin • Apparat • artistic process • Bill Drummond • Brenda Walker • Christopher Weingarten • consumer co-creationcreativitycultural democracy • David Girhammar • David Weinberger • democratised culturedigital eradigital revolutiondocumentary • Georgia Taglietti-Sonar • Hank Shocklee • Hillary Rosen • Hot Chip (group) • House of Radon (agency) • influential creatorsinformation wants to be freeJimi Hendrix • Jonas Woost • Katie Johnson • Keith Harris • Lena Dunham • Lykke Li • mass culturemasterymastery of toolsmediocrity • Mike Cosola • Moby • Nick Sansano • Norman Hollyn • Olafur Arnalds • originality • PressPausePlay • produserremix cultureRip Mix BurnRobyn • Robyn Carlsson • Scott Belsky • Sean Parker • Seth Godin • Shen Lihiu • Takafumi Tsuchiya • talent • Ted Schilowitz • Toby Smith • unlimited creative opportunities • Xiang Xaing • Yasuhiko Fukuzono • Zach Hancock

CONTRIBUTOR

Chris Thorby
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