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Which clippings match 'Community' keyword pg.3 of 19
09 MARCH 2011

Christchurch earthquake: 'It's good to be alive'

"Steve Mateer of Lyttelton tells of his frantic skateboard down the hill to get to his boys' school after his truck was nearly crushed by falling rocks when the quake hit."

(NZ Herald, Friday 25 Feb 2011)

[In great Australasian style Steve Mateer demonstrates the art of understatement as he explains how he survived the 22 February 2011 Christchurch earthquake.]

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TAGS

2011Aotearoa New ZealandAustralasiacafe • catastrophe • Christchurchcivic engagementcoffeecommunitydevastationearthquake • Lyttelton • Lyttelton Coffee Co • rock hop • skateboard • South Island • Steve Mateer • surfingsurvival • Taylors Mistake • truck • understatement • Windy Point

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
03 JANUARY 2011

In Media Res: collaborative, multi-modal forms of online scholarship

"In Media Res is dedicated to experimenting with collaborative, multi-modal forms of online scholarship. Our goal is to promote an online dialogue amongst scholars and the public about contemporary approaches to studying media. In Media Res provides a forum for more immediate critical engagement with media at a pace closer to how we experience mediated texts.

Each weekday, a different scholar curates a 30-second to 3-minute video clip/visual image slideshow accompanied by a 300-350-word impressionistic response. We use the title 'curator' because, like a curator in a museum, you are repurposing a media object that already exists and providing context through your commentary, which frames the object in a particular way. The clip/comment combination are intended both to introduce the curator's work to the larger community of scholars (as well as non-academics who frequent the site) and, hopefully, encourage feedback/discussion from that community.

Theme weeks are designed to generate a networked conversation between curators. All the posts for theme weeks thematically overlap and the participating curators each agree to comment on one another's work."

(In Media Res: A MediaCommons Project)

TAGS

collaborationcommentarycommunityconceptualisationcritical theorycritiquecuratordigital culture • Digital Scholarly Network • forumin media res • Institute for the Future of the Book • media • media object • MediaCommons • mediated texts • multi-modalmulti-modal designmuseum • networked conversation • New York University Libraries • online community • online dialogue • online scholarship • re-purposerecombinanttheory building

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
03 NOVEMBER 2010

Clay Shirky: How cellphones, Twitter, Facebook can make history

16 June 2009

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TAGS

2009cell phonecensorshipchange • changing the nature of politics • citizenshipClay Shirkycollaborationcommunicationcommunity • control of news • convergenceconversationdigital cultureempowermentFacebookgroupshistoryinnovationinteractionmedia landscapemessageNigeriaold mediaorganisationsparticipationprint revolution • repressive regimes • social changesocial constructionismsocial interactionTED Talkstransformation • transformed media landscape • Twittertxt

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
25 JULY 2010

One Man's Mission to Fight Terrorism One School at a Time

"BILL MOYERS: But this intrigues me because you've set out over these years to educate young girls primarily. I mean, you do have some boys in your schools, but primarily your goal is to educate young girls. And given the fact that the Afghani and Pakistani societies are so male dominated, that men run the families, they run the government, they run the villages, they run the Taliban, why focus on girls instead of the men who are going to, in that culture, grow up and run things?

GREG MORTENSON: Well, it's obviously the boys need education also. But as a child in Africa, I learned a proverb. And it says, ‘If we educate a boy, we educate an individual. But if we can educate a girl, we educate a community.’ And what that means is when girls grow up, become a mother, they are the ones who promote the value of education in the community. The education of girls has very powerful impacts in a society. Number one, the infant mortality's reduced. Number two, the population is reduced. The third thing is the quality of health improves. And, from my own observation, when girls learn how to read and write, they often teach their mother how to read and write. Boys, we don't seem to do that as much. They also, you'll see people, kids coming out for the marketplace, have meat or vegetables wrapped in newspaper. And then you'll see the mother very carefully unfolding a newspaper and ask her daughter to read the news to her. And it's the first time that woman is able to get information of what's going on in the outside world around--very powerful to see that. And another compelling reason is when women are educated, they're not as likely to condone or encourage their son to get into violence or into terrorism. In fact, culturally when someone goes on jihad, they should get permission from their mother first. And if they don't, it's very shameful or disgraceful. So when women are educated, as I mentioned, they are less likely to encourage their son to get into violence. And I've seen that happen, Bill, over the last decade in rural areas of Afghanistan, Pakistan. I mean, I could go on all day about this, but educating girls is very powerful."

(Bill Moyers Journal, 15 January 2010, PBS)

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TAGS

2010 • Admiral Mike Mullen • Afghanistanautonomy • Bill Moyers Journal • civic engagementcommunityculturedemocratic participationeducationemancipationempowermentengagementgender • General David Petraeus • General Stanley McChrystal • Greg Mortenson • humanitarianism • ideologyinspiring peopleIslamic worldJihad • K2 • Kunar • learning • Major General Michael Flynn • mullah • Nuristan • Pakistanparticipation • Pashtunwali code • PBSpeace • Quran • Reverence for Life • schools • Sharia law • Stones into Schools • sustainability • Taliban • Tanzania • teachingterrorism • Three Cups of Tea • traditiontransformation • Urozgan • Urozgan province • war

CONTRIBUTOR

Lindsay Quennell
08 JULY 2010

Historypin: annotate your spaces with your personal snapshots

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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