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Which clippings match 'Media Convergence' keyword pg.1 of 5
26 SEPTEMBER 2014

Intermediality in Film: A Historiography of Methodologies

"Abstract: After a short survey of the key questions regarding intermediality in cinema and placing them into the context of current debates in media studies and film theory, the paper addresses the key issues of the methodology of studying intermediality in film. In assessing the import of intermedial studies on film, the paper focuses on certain characteristic methodologies that have emerged in treating intermedial occurrences within films throughout the history of theorizing about the movies in general. Some of the major historical paradigms to be briefly described are: the normative aesthetic viewpoints in the spirit of cinematic New Laocoöns, the trans–medial theorizing of the moving image, inter–art theories, and parallax historiographies. Finally methodologies aiming at modelling intermediality and mapping the rhetoric of intermedial cinema are presented in somewhat more detail."

(Ágnes Pethő, 2010)

Ágnes Pethő (2010). "Intermediality in Film: A Historiography of Methodologies", Acta Universitatis Sapientiae, Film and Media Studies, 2 (2010) 39−72.

TAGS

2010 • Agnes Petho • artformconvergence • current debates • David Bordwell • David Rodowick • film theoryFriedrich Kittler • hybrid artform • hybrid form • inter-art theories • intermedial cinema • intermedial occurrences • intermedial studies • intermediality • intermediality in cinema • intermediality in film • Irina Rajewsky • Jay David Bolter • Laocoon • Malcom Turvey • media convergencemedia studiesmoving image • multimedial nature • Murray Smith • Noel Carroll • normative aesthetic viewpoints • parallax historiographies • post-medium • remediation • Richard Allen • Richard GrusinSapientia Hungarian University of Transylvania • Stanley Cavell • Sven Lutticken • trans-media

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
21 JULY 2013

Mobile phones as cultural resources for learning: an analysis of mobile expertise, structures and emerging cultural practices

"If it is the case that mobile devices, with their specific social and technological structures and attendant cultural practices, have become an integral part of everyday life, then the educational field has to react. But how and who? Fact is that mobile devices have reached and become fully integrated in everyday life, worldwide and across social milieus. This development is 'ubiquitous' (e.g. Haythornthwaite, 2008, Beale 2007, Nyiri 2002) and is accompanied by an increase in individualisation enabled and necessitated by a variety of mobile devices characterised by media convergence. Education must ask questions about the impact of these irreversible trends on the personal development of young people and about its role in mediating them as well as about their impact on individual agency of young people in the context of emerging socio–cultural structures (see Stald 2007)."

(Ben Bachmair, Norbert Pachler and John Cook, 2009)

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TAGS

agency of access and engagement • Caroline Haythornthwaite • educational field • emerging sociocultural structures • everyday life • Gitte Stald • individual agency • individualisation • irreversible trends • knowledge integrationknowledge management • Kristof Nyiri • learningm-learningmedia convergencemediating practicesmobile devicesmobile phoneparticipatory technologiespedagogypersonal development • Russel Beale • social agency • social and technological structures • social changesocial constructionismsocial interactionsociocultural perspectiveteaching • technological transformation • ubiquitous accessubiquitous information flowsyoung people

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
20 FEBRUARY 2013

Media technology convergence: from Desktop to mobile

"When that Apple II came out, it really could do nothing. It could show text and after we waited a bit, we had these things called images. Remember when images were first possible with a computer, those gorgeous, full–color images? And then after a few years, we got CD–quality sound. It was incredible. You could listen to sound on the computer. And then movies, via CD–ROM. It was amazing. Remember that excitement? And then the browser appeared. The browser was great, but the browser was very primitive, very narrow bandwidth. Text first, then images, we waited, CD–quality sound over the Net, then movies over the Internet. Kind of incredible. And then the mobile phone occurred, text, images, audio, video. And now we have iPhone, iPad, Android, with text, video, audio, etc. You see this little pattern here? We're kind of stuck in a loop"

(John Maeda, TEDGlobal 2012)

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CONTRIBUTOR

Alise Piebalga
28 SEPTEMBER 2012

Creative Industries KTN: Partnering For Innovation

"Creative Industries KTN will be hosting a half day event around challenge 3 of the funding competition which seeks projects that investigate the potential of Cross–Platform analytical metrics and feedback tools to help content producers better understand the consumption of their products in a converged landscape.

This session will provide an opportunity for potential applicants to learn more about the programme and how to apply to it."

(Creative Industries Knowledge Transfer Network)

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TAGS

2012aggregator • analytical feedback • analytical metrics • audience research • business of being a resident • content origination tools • content producer • converged landscape • creative contentcreative economyCreative Industries Knowledge Transfer NetworkCreative Industries KTNcross-platform • data ecology • digital content • emergent ecology • feedback tools • funding competitionGPS • GPS technology • hyperlocal • hyperlocal media • hyperlocal media models • knowledge-based economylocalisationlocationLondonmedia audiencemedia consumptionmedia convergencemetrics toolsmobile applications • publication mechanisms • quantitative data • resident • textual content • UKuser behavioursuser interactionsworkshop

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
03 MARCH 2012

Open journalism: the newspaper is moving beyond a newspaper

"If the story of the Three Little Pigs broke today, how would a modern newspaper cover it? That's the concept behind a new TV ad for The Guardian, the newspaper's first major TV spot for 25 years.

The spot launches a campaign to promote the paper's 'open journalism' approach–its name for the way in which it is attempting to involve its readership in not just commenting on stories, but contributing to and even determining its news agenda. 'Open is our operating system, a way of doing things that is based on a belief in the open exchange of information, ideas and opinions and its power to bring about change,' said Alan Rusbridger, editor–in–chief of Guardian and MediaGuardian publisher Guardian News & Media. 'The campaign is designed to bring that philosophy to life for new and existing readers.'

The launch ad examines the way in which the tale of the Three Little Pigs might be covered by The Guardian today, with all the different forms of content and different channels that implies. It also seeks to get over the way in which stories develop over time as new facts come to light and the effect of social media on switching the focus of coverage and debate.

An epic two–minute version (shown above) debuted on Channel 4 last night.

Comparisons will inevitably be made with 1986's classic Points of View by BMP (indeed the Guardian itself has said that the new ad is a 'nod' to the old one. They share an endline: The Whole Picture).

But while Points of View got over its message succintly and elegantly, Three Little Pigs is less focussed, less pithy. This can be seen as a reflection of the changing nature of media–newspapers are now less about relating THE story and more about acting as a platform for multiple strands around a topic to be explored by multiple participants, including the readers themselves, in real time. But it makes for a less memorable piece of advertising storytelling.

'The aim is to reach progressive audiences and show them why they should spend time with us,' according to Andrew Miller, chief executive of the Guardian's parent company Guardian Media Group. But you have to wonder whether such progressive types would not be aware of what the Guardian is doing anyway? The ad will probably make existing Guardian readers feel better about themselves, but will its slightly daunting complexity attract many new ones?"

(Patrick Burgoyne, 1 March 2012, Creative Review)

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TAGS

adadvertisersauthorityauthorship • Bartle Bogle Hegarty • BBH (advertising agency) • bloggingcitizen journalismcoverageCreative Review (magazine)debate • depth of coverage • digital firstdigital publishingend of printjournalismmediamedia convergencemedia landscapemedia paradigm shift • news editor • newspaperold media • open journalism • open software • printprint mediaprint publishingpublishingpublishing model • range of coverage • readershipThe GuardianThe Whole Picture • Three Little Pigs • traditiontransformationtruth

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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