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Which clippings match 'Military Conflict' keyword pg.1 of 1
09 JUNE 2015

Compelling motion infographics: The Fallen of World War II

"The Fallen of World War II is an interactive documentary that examines the human cost of the second World War and the decline in battle deaths in the years since the war. The 15-minute data visualization uses cinematic storytelling techniques to provide viewers with a fresh and dramatic perspective of a pivotal moment in history."

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TAGS

23 • 80 • Africa • AlteredQualiea • Andy Dollerson • Aotearoa New Zealand • Auschwitz-Birkenau • AustraliaAustriaaverage age • battle deaths • Belgium • Belzec • British colonial era • BurmaCanadacasualties • Chelmno • civilian deaths • concentration camp • cost of war • counting the numbers • course of historyD-Day landingdata visualisation • data-driven documentary • death campDenmark • Eastern Front • Estonia • firebombing • Francefutility of wargas chambergassingGreecehistorical perspective • human cost of war • HungaryIndiaIndonesiainfo graphicsinteractive information designItalyJapanJewish HolocaustKoreaLatviaLithuania • long peace • Luxembourg • Majdanek • military conflictMyanmarNazi Germany • Neil Halloran • Netherlands • North American historical perspective • Norwaynumerical scalesOkinawa • Omaha Beach • Pacific Rim • Pacific War • peace • Pearl Harbor • Peoples Republic of ChinaPeoples Republic of PolandPhilippinespicture statisticsPolandRomania • Siege of Leningrad • Slovakia • Sobibor • Soviet armySoviet Russia • Stalingrad • statistical graphics • Steven Pinker • Treblinka • UKvisual information designwarwar crimes • Western Front • World War II • Yellow River • Yugoslavia

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
01 APRIL 2014

Battle of Orakau anniversary fuels call for national day of remembrance

English Google translation: "It would be an understatement to say the Prime Minister John Key was challenged today as he attended the 150th anniversary of the Battle of Ōrākau. Hundreds of Maori and Pakeha turned up to support the call to commemorate NZ Land Wars. Therein lies the strength of the challenge to the PM. The time has come for all of NZ, Maori and non–Maori alike, to be counted in honouring our nation's history. For a long time we have commemorated battles fought overseas. We need to start officially commemorating the ones fought in NZ. The PM appears indifferent. Mataatua descendants returned to the site of battle where their ancestors fought.

I'm excited to see so many people here today. Their ancestors came to this site to support the cause and their descendants have now come back today. Today, ancestors who fell in battle on this very site at Orakau 150 years ago were remembered. Ngati Raukawa, Ngati Maniapoto, Waikato, and all of Tainui are grateful to all iwi who have come to Orakau to share in this experience to commemorate all ancestors who died during the Battle of Orakau. The coming together of iwi.

They've been dubbed the 'Orakau 300'. and today it's Orakau 3000 who have arrived to remember their ancestors who died 150 years ago.

Secondary students from a local school have started a petition to make today an official day of remembrance. If the message hasn't sunk in for the PM, Mataatua and Tauranga iwi will remind him at Gate Pa at the end of this month. Potaka Maipi, Te Karere."

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TAGS

150th anniversary • 2014ancestorsanniversaryAotearoa New Zealand • Battle at Orakau • Battle of Orakau • civil warcolonial historycolonial power • colonial times • colonisationcommemorationconflicthistoryindigenous historyiwiJohn KeyLand WarsMaoriMaori grievancemilitary conflict • national day of remembrance • national heritage • national history • Ngati Maniapoto • Ngati Raukawa • official day of remembrance • Orakau • Pakeharemembrance • Tainui • Waikatowarwhite settlement

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
08 JUNE 2012

David Lange: Nuclear Weapons are Morally Indefensible

"Most New Zealanders watched David Lange contest and win the 1985 Oxford Union debate, arguing the proposition that 'nuclear weapons are morally indefensible' with a mixture of pride and astonishment. After decades of knowing our place, and several years of government by homunculus, suddenly we had a Prime Minister who could stride the international stage with insouciance. And briefly, we seemed to matter.

Although New Zealand's nuclear–free policy did not become law until 1987, it was integral to early years of the fourth Labour government. The 1984 snap election that made Lange Prime Minister was called by Robert Muldoon when National MP Marilyn Waring withdrew her support for her party over the issue of nuclear ship visits. Labour won the election with a nuclear ban as a flagship policy.

The policy was popular among New Zealanders, but not without cost. Our relationship with the US deteriorated in the early weeks of 1985. On the same journey that took him to Oxford, Lange, four days before the debate, met with a US State Department official who outlined the retaliatory measures that the US would be taking against New Zealand. The ANZUS alliance of which New Zealand had been part since 1951 was effectively cancelled at that meeting."

(Public Address, 14 October 2004)

This is the introduction to the transcript of the Rt. Hon. David Lange's 1985 Oxford Debate. The transcript is copyright to Public Address. It was prepared by Russell Brown and Fiona Rae, with the consent of David Lange. Thanks are due to Radio New Zealand's Sound Archives/Nga Taonga Korero (File: Media Numbers T4705 to T4708), Infofind, the Parliamentary Library and Barry Hartley.

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TAGS

1951198419851987 • alliance • ANZUS • Aotearoa New ZealandAustralasia • Australia New Zealand United States Security Treaty • cold warcritique • David Lange • destructionethicshistory • international stage • Jerry Falwell • Labour government • Marilyn Waring • mass destructionmilitary conflictmoral purposemorality • morally indefensible • New Zealanders • Nga Taonga Korero • nuclear • nuclear weaponnuclear weapons • nuclear-free • Oxford Union • Oxford Union debate • Parliamentary Library • peacekeepingpolicypolitical policy • political reform • postcolonialPrime MinisterRadio New Zealandrepresentation • retaliatory measures • Robert Muldoon • security treaty • sound archives • televised political debatetreatyTVNZUniversity of Oxforduranium • US State Department • USAweaponweapons

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
15 FEBRUARY 2009

Humorous ad parodying the 100% Percent Pure New Zealand campaign

"ABC's [Australia] advertising show The Gruen Transfer tonight challenges two advertising agencies to put together a pitch for the campaign that will convince Australia to invade New Zealand.

John McKie from 303, Sydney, presents a spoof of the recent 100 % Percent Pure New Zealand tourism series. The spot uses music inspired by two Australian bands, Youth Group and AC DC. The tourism pitch is online at invadenewzealand.com"
(Duncan, The Inspiration Room, 9th July 2008)

[It's encouraging to think that there is enough consensus in Aotearoa/New Zealand to realise the absurdity of wasting inordinate amounts of public money on military spending. And that such spending should be devoted to peacekeeping in the region e.g. the Solomon Islands, Bougainville and East Timor (including through UN peacekeeping operations).]

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TAGS

100% Percent Pure New Zealand • ABC Television • advertisingAotearoa New ZealandAustralia • Australian superiority myth • Bougainville • East Timoremotive manipulation • Gruen Transfer • Kiwimarketingmilitary conflictNew Zealand Defence ForcepeacekeepingsocietySolomon IslandsTourism New Zealandweapons

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
26 APRIL 2006

New Zealand is not naive to the great cost of waging war

"The New Zealand war memorials of the First World War have become part of the common fabric of NZ life, like stop signs or lamp–posts. Virtually every township in the country has one, usually in the main street. Excluding the many honours boards and plaques in schools and churches throughout the country, there are well over five hundred public memorials to the soldiers of the Great War."

(Ted Harris: DiggerHistory.Info)

[New Zealand's anti–nuclear stance and recent reluctance to engage in International conflicts has its reasons. Despite it's geographical remoteness it has not escaped the impact of war. The numerous memorials erected throughout it's countryside, in it's cities and it's towns are a testament to this. There are memorials commemorating the New Zealanders that died in: The Boer War; The Great War; The Second World War; The Korean War; The Vietnam/American War as well as more recent conflicts. New Zealand is not naive to the great cost of waging war.]

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