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Which clippings match 'Modernist Aesthetics' keyword pg.1 of 3
12 MARCH 2016

Josef Frank Exhibition: Against Design in Vienna

"The exhibition JOSEF FRANK: Against Design presents the full scope of Frank's pioneering and diverse oeuvre. In light of his prodigious output of furniture and textile designs that remain current to this day and his intensive involvement with the possibilities of architecture and living in the modern era, the title Against Design might at first seem a puzzling choice for an exhibition on Josef Frank. Frank, whose work as a designer and design critic continues to be considered contemporary today, represented a pragmatic approach to design and argued for a simple and 'normal'—but by no means normative—architecture and design. He believed that existing elements should be taken into account as a matter of course and intuitively developed for practical use, without striving toward representation and innovation. To Frank, it was not so much the formal qualities, but those of social experience that were important; his interiors and household objects were not intended to be subjected to formalist concepts, but placed at the service of convenience.

Especially today, Josef Frank's ideas about an uncontrived and unpretentious functionality, whose aim was an independent, free, enlightened bourgeois domestic culture far from stylistic dogmas and fashionable conventions, seem more relevant than ever."

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applied artsarchitecture • architecture and design • Austria • Austrian architect • Austrian designer • Austrian Museum of Applied Arts and Contemporary Art • design • design critic • designer • diverse oeuvre • domestic culture • exhibition • fashionable conventions • formal qualities • furniture design • household objects • interior design • intuitively developed • Josef Frank • living in the modern era • modernist aestheticsmodernist architecturemodernist furniturenon-representationaloeuvre • pioneering oeuvre • practical use • pragmatic approach to desig • prodigious output • service of convenience • social experience • stylistic dogma • textile design • uncontrived functionality • unpretentious functionality • Vienna

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
25 APRIL 2015

Supersymmetry: a immersive aesthetic experience by Ryoji Ikeda

"Supersymmetry attempts to transform the complexity of quantum information theory into an immersive aesthetic experience, meshing sound, visual data and high-speed light displays. The show pairs two inter-related installations. As you step into the cavernous, pitch-black space at the top of Brewer Street Car Park in Soho, you're confronted by [experiment]. Three 1m x 1m light boxes, glowing white, skitter and whoosh with tiny ball bearings, forming unique and unpredictable patterns. It's a disorientating experience, leaving you feeling adrift in such a frenetic space, with red lasers constantly scanning the surface movements.

As you step through the curtain into the next space, [experience], you're plunged into the middle of two 20m-long screens, blinking with forty monitors, all displaying how the previous room's data has been analysed and translated. The synchronized monitors pulse with high-speed analyses and typed text, while the electronic soundscape -- a symphony of bleeps, buzzes and droning hums -- adds to the charged atmosphere. The overall effect, as you glance at the mutating text and the rapid-fire bombardment of data, is both hypnotic and hallucinatory, and yet there's also something strangely oppressive about being caught in this endless loop of sound and information."

(Daniel Culpan, 23 April 2015, Wired)

"Supersymmetry" by Ryoji Ikeda, 2015. The exhibition runs at The Vinyl Factory Space at Brewer Street Car Park, London, W1F 0LA, until 31 May 2015.

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2015aesthetic experienceart and scienceart exhibitionartist in residence • artistic response • austere ambienceball bearings • beeps • bleeps • buzzes • CERN • charged atmosphere • complexity • dark space • disorientating experience • droning • electronic soundscape • emotionally empty art • endless loop • hallucinatory • Higgs boson • humming • hyper-sensory experience • hypnotic • immersive aesthetic experience • Japanese artist • Japanese visual artist • Large Hadron Collider • light installationlight pulseslightboxmodernist aesthetics • multistorey building • particle accelerator • particle research • physics • quantum information theory • Ryoji Ikeda • sound and imagestrobing • Supersymmetry (2015) • symmetry • The Vinyl Factory • unique patterns • unpredictable patterns • visual artistvisual representations of scientific conceptsvisual spectacular • whooshes • Wired (magazine)

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
21 MARCH 2015

Inside the White Cube: The Ideology of the Gallery Space

"A gallery is constructed along laws as rigorous as those for build­ing a medieval church. The outside world must not come in, so windows are usually sealed off. Walls are painted white. The ceil­ing becomes the source of light. The wooden floor is polished so that you click along clinically, or carpeted so that you pad soundlessly, resting the feet while the eyes have at the wall. The art is free, as the saying used to go, 'to take on its own life.' The discreet desk may be the only piece of furniture. In this context a standing ashtray becomes almost a sacred object, just as the firehose in a modern museum looks not like a firehose but an esthetic conundrum. Modernism's transposition of perception from life to formal values is complete. This, of course, is one of modernism's fatal diseases."

(Brian O'Doherty, 1986)

Brian O'Doherty (1986). "Inside the White Cube: The Ideology of the Gallery Space", The Lapis Press.

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1976 • aesthetic conundrum • art is free • artistic modernism • Brian O Doherty • clean design • clean white box • design formalismform and function • formal values • functional formgallery spacesideology of the gallery spaceinterior architecturemedieval church • modern museum • modernist aestheticsmodernist design principlesmorphology • neutral gallery space • neutral space • neutral white box • non-placeobjectivity • painted white • polished wooden floor • programmed useregulationsacred spacessingle-minded spacesspatial configurationspatial literacy • structural features • symbolic place • symbolic structures • Thomas McEvilley • transposition of perception • tyranny of modernism • tyranny of modernist aesthetics • white box • white cube • white wa

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
14 SEPTEMBER 2014

A personal project to introduce a daughter to the Hungarian alphabet

"This book is the result of a very personal project aiming to introduce a little girl to the 44 letters of the Hungarian alphabet.

Illustrations were carefully designed so that every subject that appears in this book is something she's currently very much interested in. So in one way this book is not just a tool but also a diary documenting a four–year–old little girl's world in the summer of 2013 on an island in the Mediterranean Sea.

On the other hand though, hopefully it will also serve as an equally exciting source of knowledge and inspiration for anyone interested in language or design.

Ez a könyv egy személyes ajándék, aminek elsődleges célja, hogy megismertessen egy kislányt a magyar ábécé 44 betűjével.

Lgyekeztem min den itt előforduló illusztráció úgy elkészíteni, hogy azok az ő pillanatnyi érdeklődési körét legjobban tükrözzék. Így bizonyos szempontból ez a könyv nem csak egy eszköz, hanem napló is, ami, dokumentája egy négy éves kislány világbát 2013 nyarán, egy földközi – tengeri szigeten.

Másrészről viszont, remélhetőleg legalább enynyire izgalmas forráa lesz mindenki más számára is, akit egyszerűen csak érdekel a nyelv vagy a képek világa."

(Anna Kövecses, 2013)

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2013 • abeces konyv • alphabetalphabet book • Anna Kovecses • Blurb (self-publishing) • book illustrationbright colourschildrens bookchildrens book illustrationcolour fielddiary • early education • editorial designflat colourflat spaceFutura (typeface)Hungarian • Hungarian alphabet • Hungarian language • illustration • magyar • modernist aestheticsnostalgic tribute • preschool education • Reykjaviksans-serif typefaceself-publishing • stimulating imagination • teaching language • vibrant colourwomen illustratorsyoung girl

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
13 SEPTEMBER 2014

About Two squares: In 6 constructions: A Suprematist Tale (Suprematicheskii Skaz Pro Dva Kvadrata v Shesti Postroikakh)

"This short book, intended for children of all ages, is perhaps the best–known work of El Lissitzky (1890–1941). Lissitzky was a Russian artist, architect, designer, typographer, and photographer who was active in the avante garde movement that flourished in Soviet Russia and in Germany, until the dominance of Soviet Realism by 1930 put a stop to its revolutionary activity. He directly influenced the typographical and display advertising innovations of the Bauhaus and 'de Stijl'. This book entirely integrates modern typographical effects, as Lissitzky intended, with his illustrations in the Suprematist style.

The original book About Two Squares was printed by letterpress, even the slanted text and illustrations. It was first produced ('constructed') in 1920 at the Soviet art institute UNOVIS in Vitebsk, and around April 1922 printed by Sycthian Press, Berlin, by Haberland Printers, Leipzig, in paperback, with 50 hardbound copies autographed and numbered, as the copyright page states."

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1922 • About 2 Squares (El Lissitzky) • allegory • art books • artistartists booksavant-garde artists • avant-garde movement • black square • Bolshevism • childrens bookDe Stijldesign formalismEl LissitzkyFuturismgeometric abstractiongeometric formsgeometric primitivegraphic designgraphic design historyibiblioJew • Lazar Markovich Lissitzky • letterpress printinglithographymanifestomodernist aesthetics • modernist utopian vision • non-objective art • offset litho • offset printingpaperback • periodical design • picture bookprintingprintmaking • propagandist works • red circle • red square • Russian constructivism • Russian nationalism • sans-serif typeface • Soviet propaganda • Soviet Russiasquare • story of revolution • Suprematism • suprematism movement • suprematist aesthetics • typographical effects • typography • UNOVIS (Affirmers of the New Art) • utilitarianvisual abstraction

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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