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Which clippings match 'Henry Jenkins' keyword pg.1 of 1
26 SEPTEMBER 2014

Rethinking Intermediality in the Digital Age

"In the past decades 'intermediality' has proved to be one of the most productive terms in the domain of humanities. Although the ideas regarding media connections may be traced back to the poetics of the Romantics or even further back in time, it was the accelerated multiplication of media themselves becoming our daily experience in the second half of the twentieth century that propelled the term to a wide attention in a great number of fields (communication and cultural studies, philosophy, theories of literature and music, art history, cinema studies, etc.) where it generated an impressive number of analyses and theoretical discussions. 'Intermediality is in' ('Intermedialität ist in'), declared one of its pioneering theorists, Joachim Paech, at the end of the 1990s. However, we may also note, that since then other theoretical approaches introduced even newer perspectives that have not only revitalized the study of media phenomena in general but have specifically targeted the emerging new problematics raised by the new electronic media. Facing the challenge of the daily experiences of the digital age, discussions of media differences or 'dialogues' highlighting the 'inter,' the 'gap,' the 'in–between,' the 'incommensurability' between media are currently being replaced by discourses of the 'enter' or 'immersion,' and the 'network logic' of a 'convergence culture' in which we have a 'free flow of content over different media platforms' (Henry Jenkins). At the same time the turn towards the corporeality of perception in all aspects of communication has also shifted the attention from the 'interaction of media' towards the 'interaction with media,' from the idea of 'media borders' towards the analysis of the blurring of perception between media and reality, of humans and machines – media being perceived more and more not as a form of representation but as an environment and as a means to 'augment' reality."

The inaugural conference of ISIS (International Society for Intermedial Studies / former NorSIS) Cluj–Napoca, October 24–26, 2013. Conference venue: Sapientia University, Calea Turzii nr. 4.

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2013 • augment reality • augmented reality • between media • Cluj-Napoca • convergence culture • corporeality of perception • digital age • discussions of media differences • emerging new problematics • form of representation • Henry Jenkinshumans and machinesimmersion • incommensurability • interaction of media • interaction with media • intermediality • International Society for Intermedial Studies • Joachim Paech • Marie-Laure Ryan • media and reality • media borders • media phenomena • media platforms • multiple delivery platforms • multiplication of media • narrative theory • network logic • new electronic media • Sapientia Hungarian University of Transylvaniatransmedia storytelling

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
20 OCTOBER 2012

Concerning Intellectual Property: a conversation with Pat Aufderheide and Ellen Seiter (part four)

"In some ways, independent media–makers seem caught in the middle of this struggle, seeking ways to protect their own creative products, but also often at the mercy of bigger corporate interests. What do we gain by looking at the issues from their perspective?"

(Henry Jenkins)

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best practicesbig media • codes of best practices • copyright • corporate interests • creative productsdebateDIY • Ellen Seiter • fair useHenry Jenkins • independent media makers • independent media-makers • indie mediaintellectual propertylawlegislationmonopoly • moral-panic • noncommercial creators • Pat Aufderheide • PIPApiracypolicyprotectionremixsocial consciousnessSOPA

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
31 MAY 2010

Confronting the Challenges of Participatory Culture: Media Education for the 21st Century

"Most public policy discussion of new media have centred on technologies–tools and their affordances. The computer is discussed as a magic black box with the potential to create a learning revolution (in the positive version) or a black hole that consumes resources that might better be devoted to traditional classroom activities (in the more critical version).Yet, as the quote above suggests, media operate in specific cultural and institutional contexts that determine how and why they are used. We may never know whether a tree makes a sound when it falls in a forest with no one around. But clearly, a computer does nothing in the absence of a user. The computer does not operate in a vacuum. Injecting digital technologies into the classroom necessarily affects our relationship with every other communications technology, changing how we feel about what can or should be done with pencils and paper, chalk and blackboard, books, films, and recordings.

Rather than dealing with each technology in isolation, we would do better to take an ecological approach, thinking about the interrelationship among all of these different communication technologies, the cultural communities that grow up around them, and the activities they support. Media systems consist of communication technologies and the social, cultural, legal, political, and economic institutions, practices, and protocols that shape and surround them (Gitelman, 1999).The same task can be performed with a range of different technologies, and the same technology can be deployed toward a variety of different ends. Some tasks may be easier with some technologies than with others, and thus the introduction of a new technology may inspire certain uses. Yet, these activities become widespread only if the culture also supports them, if they fill recurring needs at a particular historical juncture. It matters what tools are available to a culture, but it matters more what that culture chooses to do with those tools."

(Henry Jenkins, Katie Clinton, Ravi Purushotma, Alice J. Robison, Margaret Weigel, MacArthur Foundation)

[2] Jenkins, H., K. Clinton, et al. 'Confronting the Challenges of Participatory Culture: Media Education for the 21st Century', MacArthur Foundation.

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affordancesblack box systemblackboardchalkclassroomcommunityconvergence • cultural communities • cultural contextcultural formsdigital media and learningdigital technologieseducationengagementFacebookFriendster • game clans • Henry Jenkins • institutional context • learning revolution • MacArthur Foundation • message boards • metagaming • MITMySpace • new media literacies • participationparticipatory cultureparticipatory learningpedagogypencilpracticessharingsocial constructionismtechnologytransformationuser

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
09 FEBRUARY 2009

One to one is not enough: participatory technologies and learning

"The ways students use digital technologies are fundamentally different from how they are taught in the design studio. Implicated herein is the practice of teaching primarily through one–on–one 'desk crits' – what design educator Cal Swann derogatorily refers to as the 'Sitting by Nellie' approach, which often results in design instructors explaining their personal experiences in order to improve the students' work.

Conversely, by motivating students as active participants in learning, who construct knowledge collaboratively with their peers – rather than relying upon transmissive teacher–to–student approaches that create what Fischer calls 'passive, consumer–learners' – co–operative technologies reduce the focus on isolated learners. Such collaborative practices are not just about learning how to master participatory technologies as a means to personal expression; they should also be understood as social skills that enable engagement within a larger group or community.

The implications of participatory technologies for the practice of design will be long–term, far–reaching and are already being felt – though they are only beginning to be understood. What these developments mean for design education has barely begun to be addressed. 'The informal participatory communities of fans and gamers are where digital natives already congregate when they seek out knowledge – not the traditional classroom where learning is seen to be static, provisional and bureaucratic,' Jenkins declares. His cautionary report that schools tend to educate only individual problem–solvers – even though students entering the workplace will be asked to work collaboratively in teams, drawing on different sets of expertise – is as valid to design pedagogy as it is to education in general.

Digital technologies allow anyone with access not only to peer behind the curtain of the mysterious creative process but to experiment with it, and even appropriate the creations of others, first hand. Pierre Lévy's notion of a problem–solving, democratic 'collective intelligence' is already a reality on the Net where most of tomorrow's designers now engage with creative culture. When this group enters higher education, they will not leave their online communities and collaborative skills at the door.

There will always be a symbiotic relationship between design and the technologies used to support the creation of artefacts. Nevertheless, once connected digital technologies are introduced in the design studio – as they were in the 1990s – a new way of (net‑)working and engaging with design's communities of practice is possible. Consequently, design education requires a new approach that imparts relevant knowledge and skills in partnership with these technologies – technologies that take advantage of a classroom that exists beyond the academy walls and position the design student as a part of a broader community of learners.

From this perspective, students are not just individualised learners, the computer is not just another production tool, and the classroom studio is not a self–contained entity where students acquire knowledge to be applied later outside in the 'real world'. This type of connected pedagogy can be envisioned as a part of a wider network of learning, fostering engagement with the field that continues long after students receive their diplomas. The design classroom and its curriculum of projects, critiques and comps still have a crucial role to play in such a context, but they have to be connected with what students already know about in their world.

This article is based on research from the KnowledgeWorks Foundation (kwfdn.org).

Illustration by João Fazenda"
(Deborah Littlejohn, Eye no.70 vol. 18)

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agency of access and engagementCal Swanncommunities of practice • consumer-learners • CoP • Deborah Littlejohn • design educationdesign studiodesk critsdigital technologiesHenry Jenkinsparticipationparticipatory technologiespedagogy • Sitting by Nellie

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
04 APRIL 2005

Learning Objects for Design (Formalism)

"'Learning Objects in Design: Written Refocalization' is a learning object for design education. A learning object for design (LOD) is comprised of the modules: concept; interpretation (examples that are interpretations of the concept(s)); design task; proto design; critique guide; resources. When delivered as a web site, as opposed to through a learning delivery system, the LOD also includes an index page. The learning object provides a design problem that embodies one or more design concepts. The student takes a partially completed design and completes it. Further, the student critiques the designs of other students according to an included critique guide. 'Learning Objects in Design: Refocalization' uses the design concepts: focus and refocalization. Its design task requires students to rewrite a story around a secondary character."

(Robert Woodbury, Steven Forth, Cheryl Qian, David Botta, Ben Lin)

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alternation • approximate symmetry • architectural design language • asymmetry • audio refocalization • balance • Ben Lin • British Columbia • Charles Jencks • Cheryl Qian • continuity editing • David Botta • design formalismdesign language • design learning resource • dominanceform and functionfunctional formgestalt principles • gradation • Henry Jenkins • hierarchy scale • knowledge repositorylearning objects • learning objects for design • learning resource • linear rhythm • LOD • narrative sequencing • pattern-making • precision snap • purposeful imbalance • refocalization • repetitionrepetition and change • Robert Woodbury • spatial perspective • spatial rhythm • spatial scale • spatial symmetry • Steven Forth • subordination • symmetrical balance • Technical University of British Columbia (TechBC) • vertical balance • visual balance • visual continuity • visual contrastvisual hierarchyvisual perspective • visual scale • written refocalization
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