Not Signed-In
Which clippings match 'Publisher' keyword pg.1 of 2
20 DECEMBER 2012

Art Photo Index: important fine-art and documentary photography

"Art Photo Index (API) is a visual index of important art and documentary photographers, their images and their websites from throughout the world.

Our goal with API is to become the most useful index and search engine for discovering and exploring fine–art and documentary photography. Unlike other general purpose search engines where pertinent information is buried within the less relevant, the Art Photo Index search tool focuses only on a vetted art and documentary photographers and their work, making it the ideal search engine for our discerning audience of curators, gallery directors, publishers, editors, picture researchers, collectors and others who love art and documentary photography.

The photographers included in Art Photo Index have been selected as a result of their accomplishments in the art or documentary photography field. Many of those included have been published by major photobook publishers or serious art photography magazines. Some have received awards given by art and documentary photography organizations. Others are represented by major art photography galleries."

(Photo–Eye)

Fig.1 Meighan Ellis (2009). "The Assistant", Te Aro, Wellington, Aotearoa New Zealand, from the The Sitters series.

1

TAGS

API (photography) • art collectorsart curator • art lover • Art Photo Index • art photography gallery • art photography organisation • curator • discerning audiences • discovering and exploringdocumentarydocumentary photography • documentary photography organisation • editorfine art collections • fine-art photography • gallery director • image database • image index • important art • important photographers • major • Meighan Ellis • Photo-Eye • photobook publisher • photographerphotography • photography awards • photography magazine • picture researcher • publishersearchsearch enginesearch tool • selected works • serious art • vetted art • vetted content • visual index

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
03 MAY 2012

Knowledge Unlatched: a new academic publishing business model

"The Problem: specialist books in the Humanities and Social Sciences (including but not exclusively monographs) are under threat due to spiralling prices and reduced library funds.

Access is restricted: while academics could choose to bypass existing publishers and just post content on the Web, the general consensus within academia is that they would prefer to have their books professionally published.

Only a few hundred copies make it into the eight to twelve thousand research universities, and very few teaching universities have access to these materials. For many individuals private purchase is beyond their reach.

A Possible Solution: cover the costs of creating the first digital copy through a library consortium and make the titles open access. Publishers would continue to generate additional revenues from the sale of print, ePub and PDFs in bespoke formats."

(Frances Pinter, 2011)

1

TAGS

2011academiaacademic journals • academic publishing • academics • bespoke format • Bloomsbury Academicbookcontent on the webdigital convergencedigital copyeconomic changeepub • Frances Pinter • groupon • humanities and social sciences • journal subscription • knowledge access • knowledge economy • Knowledge Unlatched • library consortium • long form • long form publication • longform • longform publication • media landscape • monograph • new business modelsnew digital distribution networksold mediaopen accessPDFpeer review • professionally published • publicationpublisherpublishingpublishing model • reduced library funds • research universities • sale of printscholarly journals • specialist books • spiralling prices • teaching universities

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
05 FEBRUARY 2012

Scientific publishing: the price of information

"On January 21st Timothy Gowers, a mathematician at Cambridge University, wrote a blog post outlining the reasons for his longstanding boycott of research journals published by Elsevier. This firm, which is based in the Netherlands, owns more than 2,000 journals, including such top–ranking titles as Cell and the Lancet. However Dr Gowers, who won the Fields medal, mathematics's equivalent of a Nobel prize, in 1998, is not happy with it, and he hoped his post might embolden others to do something similar.

It did. More than 2,700 researchers from around the world have so far signed an online pledge set up by Tyler Neylon, a fellow–mathematician who was inspired by Dr Gowers's post, promising not to submit their work to Elsevier's journals, or to referee or edit papers appearing in them. That number seems, to borrow a mathematical term, to be growing exponentially. If it really takes off, established academic publishers might find they have a revolution on their hands. ...

Dr Neylon's petition, though, is symptomatic of a wider conflict between academics and their publishers–a conflict that is being thrown into sharp relief by the rise of online publishing. Academics, who live in a culture which values the free and easy movement of information (and who edit and referee papers for nothing) have long been uncomfortable bedfellows with commercial publishing companies, which want to maximise profits by charging for access to that information, and who control many (although not all) of the most prestigious scientific journals."

(Feb 4th 2012, The Economist)

1

TAGS

academicacademic journalacademicsboycott • bundling • Cambridge University • Cell (journal) • Elsevier (publisher) • free access • free and easy movement of information • funded researchgift culture • Lancet (journal) • libraries • Nick Fowler • online publishing • petition • prestigious • publicationpublisherpublishers • publishing companies • referee papers • Research Works Act • scientific journals • subscribe • taxpayer-funded research • The EconomistTimothy Gowers • Tyler Neylon

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
14 NOVEMBER 2010

Publisher of Academic Journals

"Academic Journals, a broad–based open access publisher, was founded on two key tenets: To publish the most exciting researches with respect to the subjects of our functional Journals. Secondly, to provide a rapid turn–around time possible for reviewing and publishing, and to disseminate the articles freely for teaching and reference purposes."

(Academic Journals)

TAGS

academic journals • arts and education • biological sciences • disseminationenquiryinsightjournal • legal studies • medical sciences • PDFphysical sciencespublisherpublishingresearchscholarshipsocial sciencestheory

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
08 JULY 2009

Internet predicted to transform museums' relationship with public

"Two titans of the British museum world, Sir Nicholas Serota and Neil MacGregor, last night sketched out their visions for the museum of the future.

Both said that the relationship between institutions and their audiences would be transformed by the internet. Museums, they said, would become more like multimedia organisations.

'The future has to be, without question, the museum as a publisher and broadcaster,' said MacGregor, director of the British Museum.

Serota, director of the Tate, said: 'The challenge is, to what extent do we remain authors, and in what sense do we become publishers providing a platform for international conversations?"
(Charlotte Higgins, Guardian, 8 July 2009)

1

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
Sign-In

Sign-In to Folksonomy

Can't access your account?

New to Folksonomy?

Sign-Up or learn more.