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16 MARCH 2016

Lucea: kinetic sculpture by artist Anthony Howe

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aesthetic spectacle • algorithmic logic • Anthony Howe • artistelegancefractal patterngenerative designgeometry • kaleidoscopic • kinetic sculptorkinetic sculpturemovementmoving machinesNorth American artistoptical art • Orcas Island • outdoor works • perpetual motion • sculptorsculpturestainless steelsymmetrical balancesymmetrical patternsymmetry • Walla Walla Foundry • wind sculpture

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
25 APRIL 2015

Supersymmetry: a immersive aesthetic experience by Ryoji Ikeda

"Supersymmetry attempts to transform the complexity of quantum information theory into an immersive aesthetic experience, meshing sound, visual data and high-speed light displays. The show pairs two inter-related installations. As you step into the cavernous, pitch-black space at the top of Brewer Street Car Park in Soho, you're confronted by [experiment]. Three 1m x 1m light boxes, glowing white, skitter and whoosh with tiny ball bearings, forming unique and unpredictable patterns. It's a disorientating experience, leaving you feeling adrift in such a frenetic space, with red lasers constantly scanning the surface movements.

As you step through the curtain into the next space, [experience], you're plunged into the middle of two 20m-long screens, blinking with forty monitors, all displaying how the previous room's data has been analysed and translated. The synchronized monitors pulse with high-speed analyses and typed text, while the electronic soundscape -- a symphony of bleeps, buzzes and droning hums -- adds to the charged atmosphere. The overall effect, as you glance at the mutating text and the rapid-fire bombardment of data, is both hypnotic and hallucinatory, and yet there's also something strangely oppressive about being caught in this endless loop of sound and information."

(Daniel Culpan, 23 April 2015, Wired)

"Supersymmetry" by Ryoji Ikeda, 2015. The exhibition runs at The Vinyl Factory Space at Brewer Street Car Park, London, W1F 0LA, until 31 May 2015.

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2015aesthetic experienceart and scienceart exhibitionartist in residence • artistic response • austere ambienceball bearings • beeps • bleeps • buzzes • CERN • charged atmosphere • complexity • dark space • disorientating experience • droning • electronic soundscape • emotionally empty art • endless loop • hallucinatory • Higgs boson • humming • hyper-sensory experience • hypnoticimmersive aesthetic experience • Japanese artist • Japanese visual artist • Large Hadron Collider • light installationlight pulseslightboxmodernist aesthetics • multistorey building • particle accelerator • particle research • physics • quantum information theory • Ryoji Ikeda • sound and imagestrobing • Supersymmetry (2015) • symmetry • The Vinyl Factory • unique patterns • unpredictable patterns • visual artistvisual representations of scientific conceptsvisual spectacular • whooshes • Wired (magazine)

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
05 DECEMBER 2013

How calculus is changing architecture

"So, working with Bentley and MicroStation, we've written a custom piece of software that networks all of the components together into these chunks of information, so that if we change any element along the length of the building, not only does that change distribute through each one of the trusses, but each one of the trusses then distributes that information down the length of the entire facade of the building. So it's a single calculation for every single component of the building that we're adding onto. So, it's tens of millions of calculations just to design one connection between a piece of structural steel and another piece of structural steel. But what it gives us is a harmonic and synthesized relationship of all these components, one to another.

This idea has, kind of, brought me into doing some product design, and it's because design firms that have connections to architects, like, I'm working with Vitra, which is a furniture company, and Alessi, which is a houseware company. They saw this actually solving a problem: this ability to differentiate components but keep them synthetic. So, not to pick on BMW, or to celebrate them, but take BMW as an example. They have to, in 2005, have a distinct identity for all their models of cars. So, the 300 series, or whatever their newest car is, the 100 series that's coming out, has to look like the 700 series, at the other end of their product line, so they need a distinct, coherent identity, which is BMW. At the same time, there's a person paying 30,000 dollars for a 300–series car, and a person paying 70,000 dollars for a 700 series, and that person paying more than double doesn't want their car to look too much like the bottom–of–the–market car. So they have to also discriminate between these products. So, as manufacturing starts to allow more design options, this problem gets exacerbated, of the whole and the parts."

(Greg Lynn, February 2005)

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2005abnormalityalgorithmalgorithmic architecture • Antonio Gaudi • architecture • beautiful architecture • beauty • Bentley Motors • BMW • bridge • bubble diagram • buildingcalculation • calculus • Chris Williams • Christopher Wren • computational aestheticscontinuous series • curvature • custom software • dais • digital fabricationdigital toolsdimensions • Frei Otto • furniture • generic form • genetic evolutiongothic • Greg Bateson • Greg Lynn • harmonic • houseware • human-scale understandingideal form • intricacies of scale • Mannheim Concert Hall • manufacturingmathematics • MicroStation • model of beauty • model of nature • modular architecture • monstrosity • mutation • natural form • Norman Foster • parabola • part-whole thinking • physiological development • product designproduct differentiationproportions • Robert Maillart • structural abstractionstructural forcesstructural formstructuresymmetrysynthesised relationship • teratology • vertebrae • Vitra • vocabulary of form • William Bateson

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
15 AUGUST 2013

Busby Berkeley: choreographing the epic visual spectacle

"Berkeley's choreography is important less for its movement of the dancers than for its movement of the camera. To overcome the limitations of sound stages, he ripped out walls and drilled through ceilings and dug trenches for his film crews. When a desired effect could not be accomplished with traditional film equipment, he had his budget expanded to include costs for developing custom rigs. His innovations explored ideas that the stationary camera could not. He wanted to take the audience through waterfalls and windows. He wanted lines of dancers to fall away to reveal scenery that in turn would fall away to expose an even larger setting. His dreams were big, but his determination to see them actualized was even bigger.

Even his worst attempts resulted in eminently watchable movies of exhilarating movement, but his best efforts produced startling effects that bordered on surrealistic dream states. In the quintessential Berkeley films Footlight Parade (1933) and 42nd Street (1933), cameras mounted on tracks are sent soaring past a multitude of dancing legs, flailing arms and orchestra instruments. In all, he directed more than twenty musicals, including an underwater sequence with aquatic star Esther Williams."

(Scott Smith, 6 February 2013, Keyframe)

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42nd Street (1933) • aesthetic spectacleBusby Berkeleycamera angle • camera movement • camera rig • choreographic imaginationchoreographies for camerachoreographydance • dance productions • dancers • dancing legs • design formalismentertainment spectacle • Esther Williams • figures in space • flailing arms • Footlight Parade (1933) • geometryglamourgroupingkaleidoscopelegs • Lloyd Bacon • mirrored effectmovementmusical (genre)perspective viewscenerysound stage • stationary camera • surrealist stylesymmetry • underwater sequence • visual designvisual effectsvisual spectaclevisual spectacular • waterfa

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
18 OCTOBER 2012

Four to the Floor: the ever growing collection of Channel 4 idents

An "ever growing collection of Channel 4 current set of idents. The simple idea that flows through all these idents is the creation of 'the 4, be it optical illusion, supernatural intervention or coincidence, the iconic Channel 4 logo rears its head at some point during all these videos.

The basic premise leaves open many possibilities to play with, which perhaps also explains the longevity that these idents retain. New idents continue to be produced by Channel 4"

(John Beohm, idents.tv)

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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