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Which clippings match 'European Imperialism' keyword pg.1 of 1
17 MAY 2015

Al Nakba: Documentary on the Palestinian Catastrophe

"Al Nakba, documentary (200 min) -produced by Al Jazeera- was first broadcasted in Arabic on the 60th anniversary of the Palestinian catastrophe. It was translated into English in 2009 and then into four different languages: French, German, Spanish and Italian. Al Nakba won the prize for the best long documentary about Palestine in Al Jazeera Fifth International Film Festival (Doha/Qatar) and the audience award in Amal Ninth Euro-Arab Film Festival (Santiago/Spain). It participated in other film festivals in Brazil, Argentina, Italy, Jordan, Egypt and Palestine."

"Al Nakba" (2008). directed by: Rawan Damen

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TAGS

1799 • 19482008 • 60th anniversary • Al Jazeera • Al Nakba (2008) • Arab-Israeli war • archive material • British expansion • British Mandate in Palestine • catastrophecolonisation • dispossession • European imperialism • expulsion • four-part series • historyhistory of conflictideological intoleranceIndigenous peopleIsraelIsraeli-Palestinian conflictMiddle EastNapoleon BonaparteOttoman EmpirePalestine • Palestinian catastrophe • Palestinian exodus • Palestinian territories • Palestinian tragedy • Rawan DamenrefugeeState of Israeltelevision documentaryterritorialisation • The Nakba • Zionist

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
09 SEPTEMBER 2013

The 1907 Exposition Coloniale de Vincennes

"Souvent oubliée, l'exposition coloniale de 1907 dont l'ambition se limitait aux colonies françaises a été organisé au bois de Vincennes, en lisière de la commune de Nogent–sur–Marne. Le lieu même de cette petite exposition organisée par la Société Française de Colonisation, est resté intact, et l'on peut encore se promener à travers quelques pavillons de 1907, même si certain ont subi les outrages irrémédiables du temps et de la tempête de 1998.

Cinq villages sont reconstitués (Indochine, Madagascar, Congo, Soudan, Tunisie, Maroc) selon les grandes possession de l'empire français. Les indigénes de ces colonies avaient été amené pour parfaire l'animation. Il s'agissait de locaux, à qui on avait proposé un contrat et un salaire pour venir en France habiter ces villages sensés montrer comment l'on vit là–bas. Une fois sur place il est indéniables que ces personnes faisaient le spectacle à l'encontre de ce qu'aujourd'hui on appellerait la dignité humaine. Le visiteur pouvait voir de ses propres yeux, ses indigénes dont on parlait aux actualités cinématographiques. Rites religieux, danses, artisanat, la limite de l'exibition était sans aucun doute dépassée."

(Sylvain Ageorges)

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TAGS

190719th centuryAboriginalalien and strange • bois de Vincennes • Cambodia • Colonial Exhibition (1907) • colonial historycolonial mentalitycolonial powercultural differencecultural hegemonycultural imperialismcultural narrativesculture and customs • degrading • Democratic Republic of Congodignity • ethnographic zoos • ethnological expositions • European imperialism • exotic populations • fictional settingFranceFrench empire • French Indochina • human dignity • human zoos • Jardin dAgronomie Tropicale • Laosliving history museumMadagascar • Morocco • native peoplenatives • negro villages • Nogent-sur-Marne • non-European peoples • patronisingpavilion • primitive state • racismreconstruction • scientific racism • social Darwinism • Societe Francaise de Colonisation • Sudan • Sylvain Ageorges • theme parkTunisia • unilinealism • Vietnam

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
20 OCTOBER 2012

Alain Resnais and Chris Marker's: Les Statues meurent aussi

"Les Statues meurent aussi, co–directed with Alain Resnais. This 30 minute short film has a chequered history of censorship that at one time elevated it to a somewhat mythical status (2), and which prevented it from being brought into the wider public eye until some 16 years after it was completed. After its first screening at the Cannes Film Festival in 1953, and in spite of winning the Prix Jean Vigo in 1954, Les Statues meurent aussi was banned in France by the Centre National de la Cinématographie between 1953 and 1963 owing to its controversial anti–colonialist stance (3). While a truncated version was made available in 1963, the unabridged film only became available in 1968.

Les Statues meurent aussi was commissioned by the literary review and publishing house, Présence Africaine, which was set up in 1947 in Paris as a quarterly literary review for emerging and important African writers. Founded by the Senegalese thinker Alioune Diop, it housed the writings of some of the most important francophone thinkers in the latter half of the 20th century, such as Aimé Césaire, Ousmane Sembene, Léopold Sédar Senghor, in addition to French metropolitan writers such as Jean–Paul Sartre and Albert Camus. The journal also translated groundbreaking works by Chinua Achebe and Wole Soyinka into French for the first time. Having emerged so soon after the new French Constitution of 1946 had declared a 'French Union', Présence Africaine's publications signalled a new, post–colonial status for French and francophone thought, embracing what was then a key notion: that of négritude (4). It is this notion that the second half of Les Statues meurent aussi engages with most deeply, and perhaps most controversially, especially as it strives to connect the death of the statue with the rise in the commercialisation of African art for the pleasure of the colonial classes. Indeed, it is against the backdrop of a France that had so recently lost its colonial power, but which still retained many of the quasi–Manichean distinctions between white, Western culture and black, African culture, that (and in spite of their claims to the contrary) Resnais and Marker's film projected its passionately anti–colonial, anti–racist, even anti–capitalist audio–visual collage. It is little wonder then that such a film should have been censored until the late 1960s, by which time it might have lost some of its topicality, but none of its political vigour."

(Jenny Chamarette, 14 September 2009, Senses of Cinema)

[1] Sarah Cooper, Chris Marker, Manchester University Press, Manchester and New York, 2008. As Cooper points out, Les Statues meurent aussi is available as an extra on the French DVD release of Resnais' Hiroshima mon amour, Arte France and Argos Films, 2004.

[2] See Roy Armes' entry on Les Statues meurent aussi in his The Cinema of Alain Resnais, A. Zwemmer/A.S. Barnes, London and New York, 1968, p. 34.

[3] This is heavily documented in scholarship on Marker and Resnais. In particular, see Cooper, p. 12; Emma Wilson, Alain Resnais, Manchester University Press, Manchester and New York, 2006, pp. 22–4; Nora M. Alter, Chris Marker, University of Illinois Press, Urbana, Chicago, 2006, pp. 58–9.

[4] For further details see V.Y. Mudimbe (ed.), The Surreptitious Speech: 'Présence Africaine' and the Politics of Otherness, 1947–87, Chicago University Press, Chicago, 1992, pp. 3–4.

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TAGS

1953 • African art • African cultureAlain Resnaisanti-capitalism • anti-colonial • anti-colonialist • anti-racist • audiovisual • audiovisual collage • censorship • Centre National de la Cinematographie • Chris Marker • colonial classes • colonial powercommercialisationcritique • death of the statue • European imperialismfilmfilm essayFranceintercultural • Les Statues meurent aussi • negritude • post-colonial • post-colonialismpostcolonial • Presence Africaine • Senses of Cinema (journal)statue • Statues Also Die • Western culture

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
03 FEBRUARY 2009

Foundations of European Imperialism?

"In order to understand and expose the underlying global social hierarchy today, it's imperative for researchers to trace back its historical roots. Obviously this is an overwhelmingly daunting task to say the least, for the problem of racism is almost as old as Humanity itself. Therefore, we must at least try to trace it back to a more immediate past in order to comprehend the racist quagmire encompassing the world today. Now we can attest to the fact that Historical Global European Imperialism / Expansionism / Colonialism has had the most impact on reshaping the world in the last several centuries. Clearly, it has had the most influence, by far, in the world of politics, economics, education, commercialism, you name it. Furthermore without European Imperialism, "America" as you currently know it would not exist. In addition to that, had it not been for European Imperialism, White institutional control would not be so globally pervasive."
(changabula, Chinadaily BBS)

[A sensationalist (and somewhat anti–North American) but interesting perspective on the representation of East Asian people in popular media.]

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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