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Which clippings match 'Irony' keyword pg.1 of 1
27 APRIL 2017

Kung Fury: nostalgic homage to 1980s retro style

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1980s retro style2015 • action comedy • Adolf Hitlerarcade machinearchetypal charactersblack humour • brick phone • character archetypecheesy • cheesy one-liner • computer hacking • computer nerd archetype • crowdfunding • David Hasselhoff • David Sandberg • dinosaurDynaTACexcessive violence • genre hybridisation • genre play • ironyKickstarterkitsch • Knight Rider • Kung fu • Kung Fury (2015) • martial artist • melange • meta-narrative • metatext • Miami Police Department • nostalgic styleover-the-topparodypastiche • police detective • retroretro computer graphics • revenge plot • science fictionshort filmSwedish filmmaker • Thor (mythology) • time travel • Transformers • triceratops • Umea • Unicorn • vikingWorld War II

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
09 NOVEMBER 2016

The vaporwave aesthetic and the music playing behind an infomercial for public access purgatory

"Vaporwave isn’t just something you listen to either, it’s something you experience, and experiences include visuals. Vaporwave visual art, simply referred to as 'aesthetics,' is varied but tends to honor some core tenets. If you’re looking at something pink and teal with a marble classical bust and a glitchy Windows 95 logo, you’re probably looking at a vaporwave aesthetic. If you’re watching a YouTube video with a title written in a weirdly soothing stretched out font, you’re probably watching a vaporwave aesthetic.

If you haven’t guessed by now, vaporwave is a bit of a joke, or more accurately, an internet meme. Vaporwave’s trippy immediate artistic ancestor 'seapunk' was a running inside joke on Tumblr during 2011 about fashion and art and music inspired by the ocean. The look and sound of a psychedelic club run by a hipster Ariel from The Little Mermaid is a pretty accurate summation. Neon seapunk imagery even found its way into Rihanna’s 2012 Saturday Night Live performance, confounding many viewers with its colorful and stylish but garish, cheap, and seemingly unprofessional grainy green screen look. The exact difference between seapunk and vaporwave is blurry, but as far as I understand vaporwave trades the aquatic focus for a fascination with the emptiness of aging and/or amateur glossy commercialism. It’s the music playing behind an infomercial for public access purgatory."

(Jordan Minor, 03 June 2016)

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1980s retro styleamateur cultural production • amateur glossy commercialism • anti-corporate aesthetic • appropriationcheesy • classical bust • colour schemecolourfulcomputer graphicsconsumption spectacle • cultural aesthetic • digital texts • emptiness • fan art • Floral Shoppe (2011) • inside joke • internet art form • internet cultureInternet memeirony • Japanese funk • Macintosh Plus (musical alias) • manipulating samples • manufactured nostalgia • marble • memenetworked productionnew forms of expression • new sincerity • nostalgic styleoceanparticipatory mediapinkpsychedelic imageryreappropriationremix cultureretro computer graphics • runaway consumerism • seapunk • Sega Genesis • Simpsonwave • Simpsonwave aesthetic • slow jams • stretched out font • teal • tech-fueled nostalgic loop • tech-savvy • The Little Mermaid • The Simpsons (television) • trippy • Tumblrvaporware • vaporwave • vaporwave aesthetic • vaporwave visual art • Vektroid (electronic musician) • video gamesvisual aestheticsWindows 95

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
18 FEBRUARY 2012

Irony and Utopia: History of Computer Art

"Some pioneers of VR technology, including Brenda Laurel and Jaron Lanier, have been among its principal exponents, suggesting that the creation of virtual worlds and of shared cyberspaces will have revolutionary social consequences and allow hitherto unimagined forms of human expression. Such a view is echoed in the work of academic theorists like Donna Haraway and Alluquere Rosanne Stone, who believe that advanced information technologies may have radical political consequences, an idea which they pursue through the image of cyborgs which blur the distinction between humans and machines. These ideas can also be found in the use of VR as a theme in youth culture, for example the cyberpunk nightclubs and cafes in London and San Francisco. Here too, we find an agenda for cultural and political change, in this case, again, premised on innovations in human–machine interface technologies."

(Ralph Schroeder, 1994, pp.519–528)

2). Ralph Schroeder (1994). "Cyberculture, cyborg post–modernism and the sociology of virtual reality technologies: surfing the soul in the information age", Futures 1994 26(5) 519–528 (from a reading list created by Beau Sievers for the lecture series titled "Irony and Utopia: History of Computer Art" at the Bruce High Quality Foundation University).

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1994 • advanced information technologies • Alluquere Rosanne Stone • BHQFU • Brenda Laurelcomputer artcultural and political changecyberculturecyberpunk • cyberpunk nightclubs • cyborgDonna HarawayHCI • history of computer art • human expression • human-machine interface technologies • humans and machinesinformation ageirony • Jaron Lanier • Londonman machinepostmodernism • radical political consequences • Ralph Schroeder • San Francisco • shared cyberspaces • social consequencestechnology innovation • unimagined forms of human expression • utopiavirtual realityvirtual reality technologiesvirtual worldsVR • VR technology • youth culture

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
27 JANUARY 2009

Is the Selfridges joke on us?

"The ads are the result of a collaboration between [Barbara Kruger], [Selfridges] and advertising agency Mother which has been going on for several years now.

Although Kruger has always remained tight–lipped about the deal, it's obvious what she gets out of this: what better setting for her slogans than a high temple to consumerism (with an eager congregation queuing outside from 5am)? As for Mother – well, this is what they do: archly ironic social commentary that amounts to 'anti–advertising'. The assumption is that the Selfridges customer is so post–modern and media–savvy that they're all in on the joke.

But what is the joke exactly? That shopping is an alienating process. To say, 'I shop, therefore I am' is to point out the emptiness at the core of the capitalist lifestyle. Take another Kruger slogan used by Selfridges: 'You want it, you buy it, you forget it.' Get it? It's like Gerald Ratner gone highbrow. The joke is on us. Selfridges is laughing at its customers. Only we can't help but laugh along, for fear of appearing unsophisticated; unmetropolitan. How very clever of them. But let's not worry about it too much. Just keep on shopping."
(Mark Hooper Thursday 27 December 2007)

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advertisingBarbara KrugerconsumerismcultureI shop therefore I amironylifestyle • media-savvy • Selfridges • slogan • social commentaryUK

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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