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Which clippings match 'Marketization Of Education' keyword pg.1 of 2
09 JUNE 2015

Living with the H-Index: metric assemblages in the contemporary academy

"This paper examines the relationship between metrics, markets and affect in the contemporary UK academy. It argues that the emergence of a particular structure of feeling amongst academics in the last few years has been closely associated with the growth and development of ‘quantified control’. It examines the functioning of a range of metrics: citations; workload models; transparent costing data; research assessments; teaching quality assessments; and commercial university league tables. It argues that these metrics, and others, although still embedded within an audit culture, increasingly function autonomously as a data assemblage able not just to mimic markets but, increasingly, to enact them. It concludes by posing some questions about the possible implications of this for the future of academic practice."

(Roger Burrows, 2012)

Burrows, Roger (2012). "Living with the h-index: Metric assemblages in the contemporary academy". The Sociological Review, 60(2), pp. 355-372. ISSN 0038-0261 [Article] : Goldsmiths Research Online. Available at: http://research.gold.ac.uk/6560/

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TAGS

2012academic identities • academic value • Aidan Kelly • analytic error • Anne Kerr • audit culture • bibliometric measures • bygone era • campus novel • citation-based measures of impact • economic criterion • Frank Parkin • Full Economic Costing (fEC) • Goldsmiths Research Online (GRO) • governmentality • h-index • higher education • incommensurable kinds of value • Key Information Set (KIS)knowledge economylaissez faire capitalismleague tables • magniloquence • managerialism • market economic imperatives • marketization of education • Mary Holmes • metricisationMichel Foucault • monetary value • neoliberal state • neoliberalism • Nick Gane • ordoliberalism • page rank • Paul Wakeling • professionalisation • proletarianisation • public sector • publish or perish • quantified control • quantified measurementquantitative analysis • quantitative criterion • RAEREFRoger Burrows • Ros Gill • Science Citation Index • Scopus • Simon Parker • university life • work stress • workload planning

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
23 MARCH 2013

Designerly Activity: art, design and technology as research

"A great deal of art or design or technology activity entails some research, or orthodox or unorthodox kinds, in support of the main activity. It is not quite so certain that the activity itself is the same as research activity per se. One has to ask, was the art or design or technological activity an enquiry whose goal was knowledge? Was it systematically conducted? Were the data explicit? Was the record of the conduct of the activity 'transparent', in the sense that a later investigator could uncover the same information, replicate the procedures adopted, rehearse the argument conducted, and produce the same result? Were the data employed, and the outcome arrived at, validated in appropriate ways? Most academic institutions with higher level art, design or technology departments can point to at least a few cases of practical activity where an effort has been made, successfully, to meet these criteria. So can a few research institutes and professional design offices. In these cases the activity can properly be equated with research, and should be recognised and rewarded accordingly. Where any activity, whether it claims to be 'research' or not, fails to meet the criteria which define research activity as 'a systematic enquiry whose goal is communicable knowledge', it cannot properly be classed as research or equivalent to research. Where an activity does meet the criteria, it can be classed as research."

(Bruce Archer, 2004, p.28, The Design and Technology Association)

Archer, B. (2004). "Designerly Activity and Higher Degrees", The Design and Technology Association.

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TAGS

2004art and design • art enquiry • Bruce Archer • communicable knowledge • design and technologyDesign and Technology Association • design enquir • designerly ways of knowingguidemarketization of education • orthodox research • rehearse the argument • replicate procedures • research activity • research equivalence • research institutes • research results • systematic approach • systematic enquiry • systematically conducted endeavour • technological enquiry • technology activity • unorthodox research • valid knowledgevalidity

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
11 NOVEMBER 2012

Udemy: crowd learning through microcontent bundles

"There was a time when learning was what we did from birth to college graduation. After that? We just worked and eventually retired.

But the world is changing rapidly. And now, more than ever, learning is something that happens outside the classroom throughout our entire lives.

We now have to learn new skills every year just to stay relevant in our jobs (not to mention making a career change!). And it's not just our careers, we also want to learn and continually improve in the things we do outside of work. Whether it's yoga or golf or photography or anything we're passionate about, we want to be better. Every day we see our friends sharing their new achievements and posting their milestones on Facebook; how do we keep up and reach our potential?

We're busier than ever. And despite having access to a mountain of information via the internet, we still struggle to find structured, comprehensive, trusted sources who can excite us and teach us all the things we want to know. We need trusted experts, guides, to help us on our way – we need the ability to learn from the amazing instructors in the world."

(Udemy)

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TAGS

andragogy • busy lifestyle • career change • changing knowledge landscapeschanging worldcontinuous developmentcrowdlearningdigital education • e-learning bundles • help us on our way • how toinstructionInternet • keeping up • learning • learning capacity • learning the crowd • lifelong learning • maintaining relevance • marketization of educationmicrolearningnew skillsonline courses • our careers • outside the classroom • pedagogyperformativitypersonal development • reaching your potential • reflexive modernisation • reliable instruction • reliable knowledge • reliable sources • self-improvement • sharing achievements • structured content • supplemental learningtailored curriculumtrainingtrusttrust and reliability • trusted experts • trusted guides • trusted sources • trustworthiness • Udemy • virtual learning • wisdom of crowds

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
18 MAY 2009

Mike Neary: the idea of the university is up for grabs

"As the growing body of literature testifies, the role, function and nature of the university are subject to increasingly intensive debate as higher education undergoes profound transformations at the national and international level. There is no longer any consensus about the 'idea' or the 'uses' of the university (Newman 1873; Kerr 1963), if there ever was. Universities are being 'realised and reshaped' (Barnett 2000; 2005), 'rethought' (Rowland 2007) and 'redefined' (Scott 1998). While some regard these transformations positively, others feel that these changes undermine the academic mission of the university, leading to 'crisis' (Scott 1984), 'deprofessionalisation' (Nelson and Watt 2003), 'corporatisation' and 'commercialisation' (Bok 2003; Slaughter and Leslie 1997; Callinicos 2007), 'ruination' (Readings 1996) and even the 'death' of the university itself (Evans 2004).

A key issue of concern for those who feel the academic mission of the university is being undermined is the way in which the student experience has been consumerised (Boden and Epstein 2006). The concept of student as consumer is based on a market led model of corporate governance, within which risky activity is motivated by profit driven imperatives. In this paper I argue for a different model of risk, one which is based on taking progressive risks with the curriculum in order to give students more responsibility for their learning, and – in so doing – provide much richer learning environments. I describe this model not as student as consumer but student as producer (Neary and Winn 2009). This model may be at odds with the market driven paradigm, which sees universities as providing a service for students, but it has the potential, I argue, to provide the basis of a framework for teaching and learning in higher education which promotes social responsibility as the key organising function of the university, making it better able to deal with the social emergencies that underpin its own crisis of identity."
(Professor Mike Neary, Centre for Learning & Teaching – Conference 2008, University of Brighton)

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
25 JANUARY 2009

market expectations unreasonable yardstick for universities?

"To argue that universities should react to the needs of the market might seem a very natural response to resolve the disappointment many feel, but it is wholly incoherent. When fields of study, of which computer science appears to be the best example, overemphasize marketable skills, a trade off is required between the instrumentality of an education and the advancement of knowledge.

And given that markets change, requiring an ever changing and increasing set of skills, such a trade off may not only poison the type of education that distinguishes universities, it might in the end be entirely futile.

Most fields of study only prepare students for the workforce indirectly. When studying a discipline, certain skills are developed in the learning process, be they improved literacy and numeracy, or the ability to evaluate complex ideas, but such skills should not be the ends of a university education, only the means by which one succeeds. They are byproducts that may or may not be useful to the job market.

If universities are not meeting our economic expectations it is not because they are 'failing' but because we expect too much from them. The idealized image of the university, of which I am advocating, has not completely withered. Though, it has always been under threat as governments have always sought to use universities for advancing social goals, be it, as in the past, the cultivation of a sense of patriotism or the training of a cultural elite, or as in today, in preparation for the 'new economy.'

Unfortunately, the ivory tower is addicted to public money. Public money that is contingent on sacrificing intellectual curiosity in favour of the needs of the market, something that universities, should be unfit for. We could blame politicians, or we could blame the forces of globalization. However, the responsibility ultimately rests with those charged with guiding our universities. For if a dean of arts at a major institution like Ken Coates will not stand up for the university as primarily a place of inquiry, who will?"
(Carson Jerema, Macleans OnCampus, 4th June, 2008)

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TAGS

2008 • academic drift • Canadaglobalisation • ivory tower • Ken Coates • market forcesmarketization of educationnew economyperformativityuniversity

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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