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Which clippings match 'E-commerce' keyword pg.1 of 2
17 JULY 2013

The Social-Media Bubble is Quietly Deflating

"It might be over. Social–media companies drew only 2 percent of the venture capital headed to Internet–based enterprises last quarter, according to data published on Tuesday by CB Insights, a research firm that tracks venture–capital investment. In the two–year stretch that ended in the middle of 2012, social–media companies took in at least 6 percent of overall venture capital invested in Internet companies each quarter. But for three of the last four quarters, those social startups have brought in 2 percent or less (with the outlier quarter largely the result of a huge investment in Pinterest earlier this year). The peak came in the third quarter of 2011, when social companies led by Twitter took in 21 percent of the total $3.8 billion in Internet deals by venture capital firms."

(Joshua Brustein, 16 July 2013, Businessweek)

Fig.1 Andreas L avl42 (27 March 2012). "Skyline with Cranes" [http://www.flickr.com/photos/avl42/6880333552/].

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TAGS

2012ads • Anand Sanwal • Ashlee Vance • banner ad • big dataBloomberg BusinessweekBloomberg LPbusiness • CB Insights • click-through ratecloud computing • consumer-oriented application • e-commerce • economic bubble • Facebook • financial bubble • grouponInternet boom • Internet bubble • market bubble • NASDAQPinterestpredictions • price bubble • Silicon Valleysocial media • social media bubble • social media companies • social media startups • speculation • speculative bubble • Twitterventure capital • venture capitalists • Zynga

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
19 NOVEMBER 2012

Hyper Island: designing learning experiences to stay creative and competitive in an increasingly digitised world

"For over 15 years Hyper Island has been designing learning experiences for students and industry professionals alike. It all started with three men, a few beers, and one vision. The year was 1994, and multimedia pioneers Lars Lundh, Jonathan Briggs, and David Erixon converged in bar in Stockholm to discuss an upcoming CD–ROM project.

Together they realized their new digital world demanded a new kind of learning: industry–based learning. They envisioned a new institution that could prepare people for the lightening–fast pace of the modern workplace. A place where students could grow, not only as professionals, but also as human beings. ...

Hyper Island is now a thriving global presence, with two main areas of focus. Student Programs immerse young talent in intensive learning experiences from digital art direction to e–Commerce to data strategy. Executive Programs boost understanding of how digital changes societies and consumer behavior –– and how organizations need to change to stay creative and competitive in an increasingly digitized world. Hyper Island is now worldwide, located in Stockholm, Karlskrona, New York, London, and soon, Singapore. And Executive Programs teams can travel around the world designing and executing learning experiences for Fortune 500 companies and start–ups alike.

As the digital world shifts and evolves, Hyper Island continues to react and expand, creating an agile, forward–looking learning environment for students and industry leaders. What began as a bold experiment on a windswept island has become a revolutionary way to learn, reflect, collaborate, and above all, innovate."

(Charlotte Sundåker)

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TAGS

1994 • bold experiment • CD-ROM • centre for learning • challenging students • collaborateconsumer behaviourcreativity and innovation • data strategy • David Erixon • designing learning experiences • digital art direction • digital changes societies • digital worlddigitised worlde-commerceexperiential learningHyper Islandindustry leadersindustry professionals • industry-based learning • innovate • intensive learning experiences • Jonathan Briggs • Karlskrona • Lars Lundh • learning environmentLondonmultimedia • new digital world • new kind of learning • New Yorkpersonal developmentprofessional developmentreflect • revolutionary way to learn • Singapore • stay competitive • stay creative • Stockholmstudents • Stumholmen • Swedenworkplaceyoung talent

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
28 JUNE 2012

SEQ Legal: website law

"Web developers and webmasters need to ensure that their sites comply with the varied and ever–changing requirements of English law. Although it is relatively simple to create and publish a website, the legal consequences of those simple acts can be complex – and potentially expensive. A myriad of different UK and EU laws intrude upon website design, domain name choice, website content, sales from websites, and indeed every other aspect of ecommerce and online activity."

(SEQ Legal LLP.)

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TAGS

binding agreementcontractdesign businessdesign contract • domain name choice • e-commerce • ecommerce • English law • EU • EU law • intellectual propertylaw • legal consequences • legal services • online activity • professional practiceproject workrequirementssales • SEQ Legal • terms and conditionsUK • UK law • Web developers • webmasters • website • website content • website design • website law • websites

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
03 NOVEMBER 2009

Is traditional publishing dead? Next Wave

This a response to some interesting issues raised by a CNET video on future of the book.

Basically the incoming changes are going to revolutionise the whole concept in a way that the music industry still trying to cope with….see Independent article on music downloading which reveals that illegal filesharers spend more on music thus any punitive measures will actually push music sales down not up….

On offer by Xmas are Amazon's Kindle…..Plastic Logic's QUE (if it ready) and Barnes and Noble's nook

Also in background is the new Apple flat tablet which being rebranded as The Mac Slate apparently….

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CONTRIBUTOR

Shaun Belcher
16 JULY 2009

Shopping in 1999 A.D.

"From the film 1967 1999 A.D., a short sponsored by the Philco–Ford Corporation, showing what home shopping would be like three decades in the future. Although they missed the frenetic pace of today's online shopping experience–the housewife's browsing looks almost leisurely–they guessed correctly on the abundance flat–panel screens (with multiple monitors, no less), even if they were off by about a decade. Oh course, they didn't quite put together that we'd still be using keyboards for input."

(Joel Johnson, 10 September 2007, Boing Boing Gadgets)

[While this forecast is clearly about the potential of information and communication technology it also quite dramatically demonstrates the interdependence of technological development and culture e.g. reinforcing 1960's gender stereotypes.]

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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