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Which clippings match 'Collective Action' keyword pg.1 of 1
17 APRIL 2015

Tactical Media Files: a living archive of social-political action

"Tactical Media emerged when the modest goals of media artists and media activists were transformed into a movement that challenged everyone to produce their own media in support of their own political struggles. This "new media" activism was based on the insight that the long-held distinction between the 'street' (reality) and the 'media' (representation) could no longer be upheld. On the contrary, the media had come to infuse all of society.

To challenge dominant (strategic) structures in society, it was necessary develop new (tactical) means of producing and distributing media. Not a specialised task separate from the social movements, but a key activity around which social movements could coalesce. And of equal importance, the media environment characterised by a broadcast logic of geography was being supplemented with an environment characterised by a many-to-many logic of access.

Though much has changed these insights remain as valid today as they did in the early 1990s."

(Eric Kluitenberg and David Garcia)

Fig.1 Image from: Critical Art Ensemble, Digital Resistance: Explorations in Tactical Media, 2001. http://critical-art.net/books/digital

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TAGS

1990sagency of access and engagementamateur cultural productionAmsterdamartist collectivebig media • broadcast logic • broadcast mediacollective actioncritical artcritical engagementcritical perspectivescritical practices • David Garcia • digital resistance • Eric Kluitenberg • hegemonic discourse • International Institute for Social History in Amsterdam • living archive • living practice • many-to-many • media activism • media archive • media environment • media representation • multimedia organisation • new media activism • new tactical means • participative mediapolitical action • political struggles • politics of resistance • power and agency • producing and distributing media • renewal and re-invention • social historysocial movementstactical engagementtactical media • Tactical Media Files • television programming

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
02 NOVEMBER 2014

Exhibition about the use of self-education as an emancipation tactic

Exhibition: "Really Useful Knowledge", 29 October 2014 – 9 February 2015 / Sabatini Building, Floor 1, Museo Reina Sofía, Madrid.

"The notion of 'really useful knowledge' emerged at the beginning of the 19th century alongside the workers' awareness of the need for self–education. In the 1820s and 1830s, working class organisations in the UK introduced this phrase to describe a body of knowledge that encompassed various 'unpractical' disciplines such as politics, economy and philosophy, as opposed to the 'useful knowledge' proclaimed by business owners who had previously begun to invest more heavily in their companies' progress through financing workers' education in 'applicable' disciplines like engineering, physics, chemistry and mathematics. In this reference to the long–forgotten class struggles of early capitalism, the title of the exhibition suggests an inquiry into 'really useful knowledge' from a contemporary perspective.

The exhibition endeavours to position the notion of critical pedagogy as a crucial element in collective struggles, and explore the tension between individual and social emancipation through education with examples that are both historical and current, and their relation to organisational forms capable of leading unified resistance to the reproduction of capital. In doing so, the exhibition highlights the collective utilization of public resources, action and experiments, either forgotten or under threat of eradication, taking the museum as a pedagogical site devoted to the analysis of artistic forms interconnected with actual or desired social relations."

(Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofía)

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TAGS

19th century2014alternative educational models • authorised discourse • body of knowledgecapitalist structurescapitalist values • class struggles • collective action • collective struggles • critical pedagogy • early 19th century • early capitalism • early modern periodeducation and employmenteducation system • emancipation through education • everyday understanding • exhibition • folk knowledge • hegemonic discoursehegemony • historical models • inculcation of capitalist values • inculcation of values through education • individual emancipation • industrial educationindustrial model of educationknowledge is powerMadridMuseo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofia • organisational forms • political actionpower and agencyproper • really useful knowledge • reproduction of capitalreproduction of social relations of production • self-education • social emancipation • social hierarchiessocial historytactical behaviour • unified resistance • unpractical disciplines • useful knowledge • workers education • working class • working class organisations

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
29 DECEMBER 2008

Clay Shirky on Social Media and Groups

"Clay brings the conversation about social media and its affect on our communications and group forming abilities through a series of easy to grasp examples. He looks at Sharing. Del.icio.us reverses the old order of sharing – we used to get together in groups and then share. Whereas tagging now allows us to share and then form groups. Look at Flickr where you can post your tagged images on an event then go find others who have also posted on it. The example is HDR photography on Flickr which originated from someone putting the first HDR image up and another person asked how to achieve it. Soon, around HDR the interest group formed. A community of practice. Then Conversation."
(Steven Clark)

[a useful discussion – if somewhat techno–utopian and teleological]

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
04 APRIL 2005

Intimate Bureaucracy: experimental art that depends on networks of participants

"I coin the phrase, 'intimate bureaucracy' to capture this type of experimental art that depends on networks of participants. ... These almost opposed values of collective action and self–promotion combined to form the alternative to more hierarchical systems of appraising art works. Mixing the apparently contradictory collective versus conspiratorial action, Boggs' intimate bureaucracy is a poetic use of the trappings of large bureaucratic systems and procedures (e.g., money, receipts, correct change, official letters from bureaucrats, etc.) to create intimate aesthetic situations including the pleasures of sharing a special knowledge or a new language among a small network of participants."
(Craig Saper)

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TAGS

collective actioncounterfeit • Craig Saper • exchangegift culture • intimate bureaucracy • J. S. G. Boggs • money • networks of participants • participationtransaction
03 JANUARY 2004

Bowling Alone: Governance and Civic Engagement

"The norms and networks of civic engagement also powerfully affect the performance of representative government. That, at least, was the central conclusion of my own 20–year, quasi–experimental study of subnational governments in different regions of Italy [3]. Although all these regional governments seemed identical on paper, their levels of effectiveness varied dramatically. Systematic inquiry showed that the quality of governance was determined by longstanding traditions of civic engagement (or its absence). Voter turnout, newspaper readership, membership in choral societies and football clubs––these were the hallmarks of a successful region. In fact, historical analysis suggested that these networks of organized reciprocity and civic solidarity, far from being an epiphenomenon of socioeconomic modernization, were a precondition for it. ...

For a variety of reasons, life is easier in a community blessed with a substantial stock of social capital. In the first place, networks of civic engagement foster sturdy norms of generalized reciprocity and encourage the emergence of social trust. Such networks facilitate coordination and communication, amplify reputations, and thus allow dilemmas of collective action to be resolved. When economic and political negotiation is embedded in dense networks of social interaction, incentives for opportunism are reduced. At the same time, networks of civic engagement embody past success at collaboration, which can serve as a cultural template for future collaboration. Finally, dense networks of interaction probably broaden the participants' sense of self, developing the 'I' into the 'we,' or (in the language of rational–choice theorists) enhancing the participants' 'taste' for collective benefits."

(Robert Putnam, Journal of Democracy 6:1, Jan 1995, 65–78)

Robert Putnam (1993). "Bowling Alone: America's Declining Social Capital", Journal of Democracy 6.1 65-78.

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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