Not Signed-In
Which clippings match 'Amateur Photographer' keyword pg.1 of 2
17 APRIL 2014

British Pathe releases 85,000 films on YouTube

"Newsreel archive British Pathé has uploaded its entire collection of 85,000 historic films, in high resolution, to its YouTube channel. This unprecedented release of vintage news reports and cinemagazines is part of a drive to make the archive more accessible to viewers all over the world.

'Our hope is that everyone, everywhere who has a computer will see these films and enjoy them,' says Alastair White, General Manager of British Pathé. 'This archive is a treasure trove unrivalled in historical and cultural significance that should never be forgotten. Uploading the films to YouTube seemed like the best way to make sure of that.'

British Pathé was once a dominant feature of the British cinema experience, renowned for first–class reporting and an informative yet uniquely entertaining style. It is now considered to be the finest newsreel archive in existence. Spanning the years from 1896 to 1976, the collection includes footage–not only from Britain, but from around the globe–ofmajor events, famous faces, fashion trends, travel, sport and culture. The archive is particularly strong in its coverage of the First and Second World Wars.

Alastair White continues: 'Whether you're looking for coverage of the Royal Family, the Titanic, the destruction of the Hindenburg, or quirky stories about British pastimes, it'll be there on our channel. You can lose yourself for hours.'

This project is being managed by German company Mediakraft, which has been responsible for numerous past YouTube successes. The company will be creating new content using British Pathé material, in English and in foreign languages."

(The British Pathé Archive, 17 April 2014)

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8

TAGS

1896 • 1976 • Alastair White • amateur photographerarchival materialarchiveBritish filmBritish PatheBritish Royal Family • cinemagazine • cosmeticscultural collecting organisationscultural heritagedigitisation project • Edward Curtis • factory girlfactory workerfilm archive • film collection • filmed news stories • First World War • footagehair styling • heat exchanger • heat pump • Hindenburg disaster • historic filmhistorical collection • holiday camp • Mediakraft • national cultural heritage onlinenews reportnewsreel • newsreel archive • pastimes • Playboy Bunny • Playboy Club • promotion and dissemination • RMS Titanic • sea travel • Second World Warshort subjectssocial history • Titanic disaster • travelogue • vintage films • WWIWWIIYouTubeYouTube channel

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
05 DECEMBER 2012

...then my phone went and made it art

Fig.1 CollegeHumor Staff "Look at this Instagram (Nickelback Parody)" uploaded 3 December 2012.
Fig.2 Nickelback (2005). "Photograph".

1
2
3

4

TAGS

2012 • add a filter • aestheticisationamateur photographerauthenticity of thingsbeachblurry • boobs • coffee foam • CollegeHumor • craft as conceptdecorationdigital image processingdocumentingduck • eggs benedict • family snapshotsfilter • fingernails • fortune cookie • garden gnome • humourInstagramiPhoneographylikeslive feedlo-fiLOLcatsmemeMichelangelo • my phone made it art • Nickelback • parodyparticipatory culturepenispopular culture • pretentious • pretentiousness • red eye • snapshots • Temple Run

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
31 JULY 2012

What is Vernacular Photography?

"The term covers (and promises) a lot, and a quick Google search fills in quite a bit of the territory. One enthusiast snagged the domain name, but there are plenty of others in the game.

One site notes that vernacular photography is '...one of the most affordable areas of collecting and therefore offers wonderful opportunities for the beginner to acquire beautiful examples of photographic art at very reasonable prices.' gargantuaphotos.com poses the basic question: 'Why would I buy someone else's crappy old photos?', and thefoundphoto.com is another gallery/vendor.

Boston University hosted Vernacular Reframed, 'a two–day interdisciplinary conference examining issues in vernacular photography' in November 2004, but lots of enthusiasts are in the game as well: Square America, bighappyfunhouse.com, and Junior Bonner blogs about the phenomenon. Some specialize in specific genres, like photobooth and African American Vernacular Photography. Ookpik specializes in Michigan photographs, happy palace has an eclectic (and ever–growing) mix, greywater posts 'photographs from films I processed that I found in old cameras...', and eBay has a Vernacular Photography Enthusiasts group with more than 100 members.

Serious scholarship is not far behind: Electronic Journal of Vernacular Photography may be stillborn, but Innocence regained? Or just another kind of fiction? from eye magazine suggests that there are many who take the medium seriously. One is Geoffrey Batchen who taught a course at CUNY's Graduate Center (there's a video of a lecture he gave at Brown)

Quite a few museums have had vernacular photography shows, including Kodak and the Rise of Amateur Photography at New York's Metropolitan Museum, and this grant proposal from the Indiana University Archives Seeing the Color of America: Digitizing the Charles Cushman Collection is evidence of archival interest in the medium.

My friend Joan Larcom reminds me of one of the authorities who has done the most in this realm, Michael Lesy, and his coinage of the term demotic photography, which I find a good supplement to 'vernacular'. A New York Times story notes that:

'In the past, Mr. Lesy has ruffled some academic feathers by arguing that what he calls 'demotic photography,' like family snapshots or picture postcards, deserves the same level of scholarly study traditionally given only to art photography... 'my whole intention is to subvert the [art photography] canon... There are possibilities that go beyond the safe definitions of what an artist is and what the camera is used for. ...Academics... deal with photographs as aesthetic, intellectual constructs, or as integers in philosophical or linguistic argument. That's not all they are. They're slippery and deeply emotionally charged. A photograph is a thing which, to use an old scholarly word, needs to be 'unpacked.' There's the manifest content, then half a dozen layered contents.'
(NYT 17 Dec 2005 sec B pg 9)"

(Hugh Blackmer, oook.info)

1

TAGS

2004academic journal • accidental documents • amateur cultural productionamateur photographeramateur photographyanonymous • anonymous snapshots • archival interest • art photography • Charles Cushman Collection • City University of New York • CUNY • demotic photography • Electronic Journal of Vernacular Photography • family photos • family snapshotsfound • found films • found photographs • Geoffrey Batchen • Hugh Blackmer • Indiana University Archives • Kodak and the Rise of Amateur Photography • layered meaninglayers of meaningmanifest content • Michael Lesy • New York Metropolitan Museum • newspaper photographs • nostalgia • Ookpik • photobooth • photobooth photography • photographic art • photography enthusiasts • picture postcardspostcardreadymadesnapshotsnapshotsvernacular photography • vernacular photography enthusiasts • vernacular photography shows • Vernacular Reframed (conference)

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
26 JULY 2009

Jimmy Forsyth: Photographer who chronicled vanishing community life in the UK north-east

"The Tyneside amateur photographer Jimmy Forsyth, who has died aged 95, produced an acclaimed portrait of industrial working–class life in Britain.
...
in the early 1950s he heard rumours of plans to demolish Elswick and Scotswood Road. A whole way of life was under threat, and Jimmy imagined that he could capture the spirit of the community through photography. Thus he began in 1954, with a second–hand box camera and no formal training, his epic project to produce a portrait of the area by a trusted insider.

Mindful of posterity, he took a systematic approach – his images are indexed and his subjects carefully identified. Crucially, the task also saved Jimmy from unemployment. He assembled the prints, processed by Boots or a local chemist, in tartan–covered albums, and including the price of the films, his photography probably consumed a considerable part of his £2–a–week National Assistance money. Often he would sell people their prints for half a crown to fund the next roll of film. In an effort to improve his finances, Jimmy opened a shop in 1956 in Pine Street, but his generosity in providing goods 'on tick' soon forced him to sell up.

When the bulldozers eventually came to Elswick in the late 1950s, they inspired a period of intense activity for Jimmy, who stayed until the last moment to document the painful process of demolition. He even photographed the demolition men and the families left behind, until, he said, there was a knock at 356 Scotswood Road, where he was living: 'You'd better move out. We're doing this block next.'"
(The Guardian, 16 July 2009)

[Jimmy Forsyth, 1957. Scotswood Teddy Boys]

1

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
19 JANUARY 2009

Scoopt: cashing in on cameraphone journalism

"Scoopt is a media agency that has been created specifically to help members of the public sell photographs and videos of newsworthy events to the media. We bridge the gap between amateur photographer – and by 'amateur', we mean anybody with a digital camera or a cameraphone who just happens to be in the right place at the right time – and picture desks. Scoopt is now owned and operated by Getty Images, which means that Scoopt members have direct access to worldwide media markets."
(Scoopt FAQ)

1

TAGS

agencyamateuramateur photographerauthorshipbrokeragecameraphonecitizen journalismdigital cameradigital mediaenterpriseeyewitnessGetty Images • news photography • newspaper photography • opportunismrepository • Scoopt • traditionUK

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
Sign-In

Sign-In to Folksonomy

Can't access your account?

New to Folksonomy?

Sign-Up or learn more.