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Which clippings match 'Amateur' keyword pg.1 of 2
20 APRIL 2012

The amateur video which sparked the 1992 Los Angeles Civil Unrest

"in March 1991, television screens across the world broadcast [George Holliday's] videotaped footage of LAPD officers raining down 56 baton blows on an African American named Rodney King. ... on April 29, 1992, a jury in Simi Valley, one of the whitest exurbs of Los Angeles, acquitted three of the four officers involved in beating Rodney King. The response in South Los Angeles was loud and immediate: That night, thousands of residents, black and Latino, took to the streets, starting a four–day riot that destroyed more than 1,000 buildings, injured 2,500 people, killed 58, and resulted in $1 billion in damage and 16,000 arrests."

(Josh Sides, 19/04/2012, Design Observer)

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TAGS

19911992 • 1992 Los Angeles Civil Unrest • acquitted • African Americanamateuramateur cameraamateur videoarsonassault • baton • beating • brutalitybystandercitiescitizen journalismcivic engagementcivil disobediencecivil libertiescivil rights • civil unrest • damageethics • exurb • eyewitnessforce of law • George Holliday • high-speed pursuit • Hispanic • injusticejustice • LAPD • Latasha Harlins • Latino • looting • Los Angeles • Los Angeles Police Department • Los Angeles Riots • manslaughter • motoristmurderpolicepolice brutality • police officer • povertypower corrupts • property damages • real behaviourriot • rioted • riots • Rodney King • self-control • Simi Valley • social differentiationsocial responsibility • South Central Riots • suffering injustice • television report • unethical behaviourunjustunjust powervideotapedvideotaped footage

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
04 FEBRUARY 2012

Star Wars Uncut: crowdsourcing Star Wars 15 seconds at a time

"Star Wars Uncut is the brainchild of Casey Pugh, a developer dedicated to creating new and fun experiences on the web.

In 2009, Casey became interested in using the internet as a tool for crowdsourcing user content.

Star Wars was a natural choice to explore the dynamics of community creation on the web – the response from fans has been overwhelming worldwide and the resulting movie is incredibly fun to watch."

(Casey Pugh)

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TAGS

15 seconds • 2009amateuramateur cultural productionamateur videoanimationauthorship • Casey Pugh • collaborationcollage • community creation • copycrowdsourcingfandomfans • geeky • homagehome movieLEGOlo-fimimicrymovienetwork societyparticipationplayfulproduce a segmentremix culturesharingsocial mediaStar Wars • star wars geek • Star Wars Uncut • sweding • upload your footageuser-generated contentvideovideo collageVimeovirtual collaborationworldwide communityYouTube

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
31 OCTOBER 2010

The Internet of the 90's was bright, rich, personal, slow and under construction

"To be blunt [the Internet of the 90's] was bright, rich, personal, slow and under construction. It was a web of sudden connections and personal links. Pages were built on the edge of tomorrow, full of hope for a faster connection and a more powerful computer. One could say it was the web of the indigenous...or the barbarians. In any case, it was a web of amateurs soon to be washed away by dot.com ambitions, professional authoring tools and guidelines designed by usability experts.

I wrote that change was coming 'soon' instead of putting an end date at 1998, for example, because there was no sickness, death or burial. The amateur web didn't die and it has not disappeared but it is hidden. Search engine rating mechanisms rank the old amateur pages so low they're almost invisible and institutions don't collect or promote them with the same passion as they pursue net art or web design.

Also new amateur pages don't appear at such amounts as ten years ago because the WWW of today is a developed and highly regulated space. You wouldn't get on the web just to tell the world, 'Welcome to my home page.' The web has diversified, the conditions have changed and there's no need for this sort of old fashioned behaviour. Your CV is posted on the company website or on a job search portal. Your diary will be organised on a blog and your vacation photos are published on iPhoto. There's a community for every hobby and question.

This is why I refer to the amateur web as a thing of the past; aesthetically a very powerful past. Even people who weren't online in the last century, people who look no further than the first 10 search engine results can see the signs and symbols of the early web thanks to the numerous parodies and collections organised by usability experts who use the early elements and styles as negative examples."

(Olia Lialina, February 2005)

Fig.1 Cyndi Howells. 'Cyndi's Genealogy Home Page Construction Kit'

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1990s2005ad-hocaestheticsamateur • amateur pages • animated gifauthoring toolbox modeldesign for the screendesign formalismdesign historydigital culture • dot.com • experthistoryhome pageInternetmasterymedia artMIDInet artnew mediaOlia Lialinaparticipationpastiche • personal links • regulated space • regulationtransformationunder constructionusability • usability experts • usability guidelines • vernacularvisual communicationvisual designvisual languagevisual literacywebweb designweb vernacularwww

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
31 OCTOBER 2010

コミPo!...ComiPo! Manga Sequencer

"the Tokyo–based Web Technology Com Corp. held a press conference for their new software 「コミPo!」(AKA ComiPo!). This 'manga sequencer' – the first of it's kind for the PC – allows users to create their own Japanese comics with all the trimmings: character models, big eyes, facial expressions, panel layouts, dialogue, sound effects, speed lines, the works."

(Patrick Macias, 16 October 2010)

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amateuramateur cultural productionauthoring toolcharactercomic book • ComiPo! • designdrawingfandomJapan • Keiichi Tanaka • manga • manga sequencer • otakuOtakulturepublishingremix culturescriptiblesequence designsoftwarevisual communication

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
15 JANUARY 2010

Web 2.0 has created a cult of digital narcissism and amateurism?

"Critics such as Andrew Keen argue that Web 2.0 has created a cult of digital narcissism and amateurism, which undermines the notion of expertise by allowing anybody, anywhere to share (and place undue value upon) their own opinions about any subject and post any kind of content regardless of their particular talents, knowledgeability, credentials, biases or possible hidden agendas. He states that the core assumption of Web 2.0, that all opinions and user–generated content are equally valuable and relevant is misguided, and is instead 'creating an endless digital forest of mediocrity: uninformed political commentary, unseemly home videos, embarrassingly amateurish music, unreadable poems, essays and novels,' also stating that Wikipedia is full of 'mistakes, half truths and misunderstandings'."

(http://influxive.com/)

TAGS

2.0 portals • advance web • amateuramateurismbiascommentarycontentcritiquedigital narcissismexpertisemasterymediocritynarcissismopinion • political commentary • relationship management • search engine optimisationSEOsmall businesstruthuser-generateduser-generated contentwebWeb 2.0Web 3.0web developmentWikipedia

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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