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Which clippings match 'Collections' keyword pg.1 of 3
07 OCTOBER 2014

Radical Museology / Working the Collection

"Drawing from Claire Bishop's recently published Radical Museology Or What's Contemporary in Museums of Contemporary Art? and taking place against the backdrop of our reading of the Arts Council England Collection, this roundtable focuses on the economic, historiographical, geopolitical and wider societal stakes of public acquisition and collection display. Focusing on museums that offer non–conservative and critically–reflective models.

Participants include Jesús Carrillo (Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofia, Madrid), Francesco Manacorda (Artistic Director, Tate Liverpool) and Marta Dziewanska (Museum of Modern Art Warsaw). Chaired by Claire Bishop."

(Chaired by Claire Bishop, 22 May 2014, Nottingham Contemporary)

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TAGS

2014acquisitionsart historyart museumArts Council England • Arts Council England Collection • chronological ordering • Claire Bishop • collection display • collectionsconstellations metaphor • contemporaneity • contemporary artcontemporary art exhibitionscontemporary art museumcontemporary culture • critically-reflective models • Dan Perjovschi • dialectical contemporaneity • Francesco Manacorda • geopolitical • historiographical • Isobel Whitelegg • Jesus Carrillo • Madrid • Marta Dziewanska • Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofiamuseologymuseum • Museum of Modern Art Warsaw • museum studies • museumsNottingham Contemporaryperiodisation • permanent collection • presentism • public acquisitions • Reina Sofia • short-termism • Tate Liverpool • The Arcades Projectthematic organisation • Warsaw

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
15 JUNE 2014

The peculiar case of the Icelandic Phallological Museum

"Paris has the Louvre. London has the Tate Modern, and New York the Metropolitan Museum. But Husavik, Iceland–a diminutive village on the fringe of the Arctic Circle–boasts the world's only museum devoted exclusively to painstakingly preserved male genitalia. Founded and curated by Sigurður 'Siggi' Hjartarson, the Icelandic Phallological Museum houses four decades worth of mammalian members, from a petite field mouse to the colossal sperm whale, and every 'thing' in between. But, lamentably, Siggi's collection lacks the holy grail of phallic phantasmagoria: a human specimen. Siggi's world changes dramatically when he receives generous offers from an elderly Icelandic Casanova and an eccentric American. However, as the competition for eternal penile preservation heats up between the two men, Siggi soon discovers that this process is more complicated than it initially appeared. In their debut feature film, Jonah Bekhor and Zach Math follow Siggi on his dogged, often emotional quest to complete his exhibition in a peculiar, yet startlingly relatable, story of self–fulfillment and the value of personal legacies (both big and small)."

Jonah Bekhor and Zach Math (2012). "The Final Member" [documentary film, http://www.imdb.com/title/tt2318701/]

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TAGS

2012anatomyarctic circle • Ari Karlsson • Asbjorn Bjorgvinsson • bodycabinet of curiosities • Casanova • collections • collector • documentary film • documentary subject • Douglas Mason • Drafthouse Films • eccentric • eccentric collection • Fantastic Fest • genitalia • genitals • Hannes Blondal • Helgi Heoinsson • human donor • human specimen • Husavik • Iceland • Icelandic Phallological Museum • intriguing objects • Jonah Bekhor • male genitalia • mammalian penis • mammals • Marci Bowers • Mitchell Morris • museumNorth American • organ donor • Pall Arason • Paula-Jo Husack • penis • penis museum • penis size • personal collections • personal legacies • Petur Halldoresson • phallic • phallic phantasmagoria • Reynir Hjartarson • Sigurour Hjartarson • Sin Hastings • specimentaboo subjects • taxidermist • Terry Gunnel • The Final Member (2012) • Tom Mitchell • Zach Math

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
23 SEPTEMBER 2013

The Broad: contemporary art museum by Diller Scofidio + Renfro

"The Broad is a new contemporary art museum built by philanthropists Eli and Edythe Broad on Grand Avenue in downtown Los Angeles. The museum, which is designed by Diller Scofidio + Renfro, will open to the public in late 2014. The museum will be home to the nearly 2,000 works of art in The Broad Art Foundation and the Broads' personal collections, which are among the most prominent holdings of postwar and contemporary art worldwide. With its innovative 'vault–and–veil' concept, the 120,000–square–foot, $140–million building will feature two floors of gallery space to showcase The Broad's comprehensive collections and will be the headquarters of The Broad Art Foundation's worldwide lending library."

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TAGS

2014architectural spacearchitectureart museumbox • Charles Renfro • collectionscontemporary artcontemporary art museumdesign proposalsDiller Scofidio + Renfro • display design • display of apparatus • display of process • Edythe Broad • Eli and Edythe Broad • Eli Broad • fine art collectionsgallery spaces • Grand Avenue LA • holdings • lending library • lightLiz DillerLos Angelesmuseumpersonal collectionsporous spacesproject pitchpurpose-builtRic Scofidiosculptural formshowcase • storage facility • The Broad (museum) • The Broad Art Foundation • transparency • vault • veiled • Walt Disney Concert Ha

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
26 MARCH 2013

The use of inspirational works by designers to create new ideas

"Designers immerse themselves in environments rich in inspiration: collecting examples, amassing libraries, pinning notes and images around their workspaces, and so on. There is a broad recognition that much of the design proceeds by modification of previous ideas (e.g., Oxman, 1990) and that experts amass collections of examples and precedents to employ in design (e.g., Lawson, 2004). Indeed there are attempts to introduce students to relevant design precedents (e.g., Heylighen and Verstijnen, 2003). However, much of the previous research has tended to focus on reference, recall, and reasoning, and to neglect the vital role of explicit external sources of inspiration in triggering and guiding designers' activities. It appears that many attempts at computer support and most research starts with conceptual design; this paper reports on research which attempts to investigate the even earlier gathering of sources of inspiration and exploration of ideas and hence to understand the mechanisms by which inspiration is harnessed (see also Eckert and Stacey, 2000)."

(Marian Petrea, Helen Sharpa and Jeffrey Johnson, 2006, Design Studies)

Marian Petrea, Helen Sharpa and Jeffrey Johnson (2005). "Complexity through combination: an account of knitwear design", Volume 27, Issue 2, March 2006, Pages 183–222

TAGS

2005 • amassing • Ann Heylighen • Bryan Lawson • Claudia Eckertclippingcollecting • collecting examples • collecting ideas • collection of ideascollectionsconceptual archivecool stuffdesign artefacts • design environments • design inspiration • design precedents • Design Studies (journal) • explicit external sources • favourite things • gathering • gathering sources • get inspiration • Ilse Verstijnena • inspirationinspirational visual content • inspirational working environments • inspirational works • inspiring creative workplaces • Keith Billings • knitwear • knitwear designMartin Staceymaterial culture • mental imagery • modification of previous ideas • new ideaspersonal collections • personal curation • personal libraries • pinning • pinning images • pinning notes • precedents • reference collections • reference resources • reference works • Rivka Oxman • Samer Akkach • semi-structured interviewsources of inspiration • spatial reasoning • triggering ideasvisual ideasvisual research

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
09 JANUARY 2013

National Archives of Australia: Archives Viewer

"Say hello to the Archives Viewer (naming things isn't really one of my strengths). Instead of rewriting my existing script I decided to create a completely new web application. Why? Mainly because it gave me a lot more flexibility. I could also make use of a variety of existing tools and frameworks like Django, Bootstrap, Isotope and FancyBox. Standing upon the code of giants, I had the whole thing up and running in a single weekend. The code is available on GitHub.

What does it do? Simply put, just feed the Archives Viewer the barcode of a digitised file in RecordSearch and it grabs the metadata and images and displays them in a variety of useful ways. It's really pretty simple, both in execution and design.

Yep, there's a wall. It's not quite as spacey and zoom–y as the CoolIris version, but perhaps that's a good thing. It's just a flat wall of page image thumbnails with a bit of lightbox–style magic thrown in. But when I say just, well... look for yourself. There's something a bit magical about seeing all the pages of a file at once, taking in their shapes and colours as well as their content. This digital wall provides a strangely powerful reminder of the physical object.

Of course you can also view the file page by page if you want. Printing is a snap – just type in any combination of pages or page ranges and hit the button. The images and metadata are assembled ready to print. No more wondering 'which file did this print out come from?'.

But perhaps the most important feature is that each page has it's own unique, persistent url. Basic stuff, but oh, so important. With a good url you can share and cite. Find something exciting? Tell the world about it! I've included your typical social media share buttons to help you along."

(Tim Sherratt, 29 August 2012)

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TAGS

Archives Viewer • barcodeBootstrap (toolkit)collections • CoolIris • digital humanities • Django • FancyBox • GitHub • image viewer • Invisible Australians • Isotope • lightboxmetadataNational Archives of Australia • persistent url • RecordSearch • Tim Sherratt • web applicationwhite Australia policy

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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