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Which clippings match 'Market Segmentation' keyword pg.1 of 2
02 JULY 2014

Procter & Gamble use 'Like a Girl' viral to co-opt female consumers

"Procter & Gamble Co.'s Always today is launching 'Like a Girl,' a video ... that takes issue with generations of playground taunts about people running, throwing or fighting 'like a girl.' It asks: 'When did doing something 'like a girl' become an insult?'"

(Jack Neff, 26 June 2014, Advertising Age)

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
22 AUGUST 2013

Re-imagining segmentation in Google Analytics

"One of the most popular and powerful features in Google Analytics is Advanced Segmentation. It lets you isolate and analyze subsets of your traffic. You can select from predefined segments such as 'Paid Traffic' and 'Visits with Conversions' or create your own segments with a flexible, easy–to–use segment builder. Then, you can apply one or more of these segments to current or historical data, and even compare segment performance side by side in reports.

We've recently re–imagined segmentation to make it even easier for new Analytics users, yet also more powerful for seasoned analysts and marketers."

(Google Inc)

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TAGS

2013analysing dataanalysis dataanalyticsanimated explainer video • cohort analysis • cohort segmentation • cohort studies • compare segment performance • customersdata gathering instrumentsdemographics • Google Analytics • Google Inchistorical datamarket segmentationmetricsmetrics toolsreports • segment builder • segmentation • site behaviours • sub-segment • subset • traffic analysistransaction datatrend analysisuser behavioursuser demographicsuser groupsuser segmentationwebsite traffic statistics

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
10 FEBRUARY 2012

Peggy Orenstein on our gender performance culture

"Peggy Orenstein ('Cinderella Ate My Daughter: Dispatches from the Front Lines of the New Girlie–Girl Culture') and Kaveri Subrahmanyam ('Digital Youth: The Role of Media in Development') had a conversation about girl culture and digital media for Googlers in Santa Monica on February 9, 2011. They were joined by Adriana Manago, who works with Kaveri at the Children's Digital Media Center (UCLA/CSULA)."
(About @Google Talks, 9 February 2011)

Fig.1 Kaveri Subrahmanyam talks to Peggy Orenstein about "Cinderella Ate My Daughter", About @Google Talks [18:24]

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TAGS

Adriana Manago • Barbie Fashion Designer • boredomboys • bullying • chat roomCinderella • Cinderella Ate My Daughter • culture of prettydesiredigital mediadigital youthdoll playempowermentFacebookfeminismgendergender performance culture • girlhood • girlsGoogle Inc • Google Talks • identity • identity development • Kaveri Subrahmanyam • Lord and Taylor • market segmentationmedia literacy • media researcher • new medianew technology • nursery colours • overcoding • parent • Peggy Orenstein • performance cultureperformativitypinkpink and prettyplaying with dolls • popular zeitgeist • pornographyprettysextingsexual agencysexualisationsexualitysocial mediasocialisation • Tyler Clementi • young girl

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
16 MAY 2011

Market research should focus on emotional need states in all consumers rather than focus on segments as if they are stable and mutually exclusive

"The concept of the USP, as seen by the brand manager, is to focus on one main selling benefit of the brand versus those offered by competitors. The strategic thinking which goes into selecting a brand's USP resembles warfare between competitive brands, with imagery maps reflecting the battlefield, and positioning statements as the weapons. But where is the consumer in all of this?

Consumers do not want one characteristic or one USP. Consumers want it all. Why should a consumer have to choose between the longest lasting pain reliever versus the fast acting, or the safest, most gentle, or the cheapest priced? The concept of marketing a USP is not a consumer–centric view. It is not a realistic, relevant reflection of how consumers operate. Furthermore, a USP for a brand is limiting in appeal by the very definition of trying to sell one main benefit to the sub–segment of consumers which most values that one benefit. Consumers want pain relievers to be fast–acting, and safe, and strong, and inexpensive and more.

The consumers' emphasis on one or more of these benefits changes from occasion to occasion, and from mood to mood. Consumers are not stable, nor consistently rational. Although segmentation research allows us to place consumers into distinct groups, and to put a descriptive label on each person, consumers are not fixed with just the characteristics of the one segment. The reality is all consumers have all emotional needs within them. Some elements/associations are stronger and some are weaker, depending on the person and the day. Our emotional desires fluctuate such that what appeals to one person in one week might be less appropriate for the same person the next week. These fluctuations are hard to target because a population of consumers are all in fluctuation. This is why segmentation research can be so frustrating to market researchers when trying to neatly explain brand behaviors. Unique segments do not uniquely buy just one or two uniquely defined brands. And segments are not stable.

Instead, brand managers should be targeting all consumers with the intention of painting their brand with the emotional associations the brand can satiate. Market research should focus on emotional need states in all consumers rather than focus on segments as if they are stable and mutually exclusive. "

(John Hallward, 2007)

2). excerpt from John Hallward (2007). "Gimme! The Human Nature of Successful Marketing", Wiley

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TAGS

appeal • associations • brandbrand behavioursbrand managercharacteristicscommodity • competitive brands • competitorconsumer • consumer-centric view • descriptive labelsemotional desiresemotional needsemotive manipulationgroupshuman nature • John Hallward • market researchers • market segmentationmarketingpositioning statements • satiate • segmentation • segmentation research • selling • strategic thinkingsub-segment • successful marketing • target audience • unique selling point • unique selling proposition • USP

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
27 APRIL 2011

User-Centred Design: Personas

"Personas are 'hypothetical archetypes' of actual users. They are not real people, but they represent real people during the design process. A persona is a fictional characterization of a user.

The purpose of personas is to make the users seem more real, to help designers keep realistic ideas of users throughout the design process. Personas have proper names (that are often catchy and related to their user group name, for example, Hanna Reed–Smith, Human Resources Specialist) and are represented with pictures. Designers and evaluators refer to personas when considering design specifics; for example, 'Would Hanna know to click on that button to add a new employee?' Personas put a name, face, and characteristics on users to keep the users in the forefront of design decisions."

(Shawn Lawton Henry)

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TAGS

accessibility • analysis phase • archetypal charactersarchetype • brand loyalty • catchy names • characteristicsdemographics • design hypotheticals • design methoddesign processdesign techniquedisability • experience levels • fictional account • fictional characterisation • fictional scenarioshuman factorshuman-centred design • hypothetical archetypes • market segmentation • marketing personas • marketing teammotivational needs • personal details • personas (UCD)product developmenttarget audiencethinking tooluser analysisuser attitudesuser behavioursuser demographics • user goals • user group name • user groupsuser motivationsuser perspective • user profile • User-Centred Design (UCD)

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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