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Which clippings match 'Ideal Form' keyword pg.1 of 2
05 DECEMBER 2013

How calculus is changing architecture

"So, working with Bentley and MicroStation, we've written a custom piece of software that networks all of the components together into these chunks of information, so that if we change any element along the length of the building, not only does that change distribute through each one of the trusses, but each one of the trusses then distributes that information down the length of the entire facade of the building. So it's a single calculation for every single component of the building that we're adding onto. So, it's tens of millions of calculations just to design one connection between a piece of structural steel and another piece of structural steel. But what it gives us is a harmonic and synthesized relationship of all these components, one to another.

This idea has, kind of, brought me into doing some product design, and it's because design firms that have connections to architects, like, I'm working with Vitra, which is a furniture company, and Alessi, which is a houseware company. They saw this actually solving a problem: this ability to differentiate components but keep them synthetic. So, not to pick on BMW, or to celebrate them, but take BMW as an example. They have to, in 2005, have a distinct identity for all their models of cars. So, the 300 series, or whatever their newest car is, the 100 series that's coming out, has to look like the 700 series, at the other end of their product line, so they need a distinct, coherent identity, which is BMW. At the same time, there's a person paying 30,000 dollars for a 300–series car, and a person paying 70,000 dollars for a 700 series, and that person paying more than double doesn't want their car to look too much like the bottom–of–the–market car. So they have to also discriminate between these products. So, as manufacturing starts to allow more design options, this problem gets exacerbated, of the whole and the parts."

(Greg Lynn, February 2005)

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TAGS

2005abnormalityalgorithmalgorithmic architecture • Antonio Gaudi • architecture • beautiful architecture • beauty • Bentley Motors • BMW • bridge • bubble diagram • buildingcalculation • calculus • Chris Williams • Christopher Wren • computational aestheticscontinuous series • curvature • custom software • dais • digital fabricationdigital toolsdimensions • Frei Otto • furniture • generic form • genetic evolutiongothic • Greg Bateson • Greg Lynn • harmonic • houseware • human-scale understandingideal form • intricacies of scale • Mannheim Concert Hall • manufacturingmathematics • MicroStation • model of beauty • model of nature • modular architecture • monstrosity • mutation • natural form • Norman Foster • parabola • part-whole thinking • physiological development • product designproduct differentiationproportions • Robert Maillart • structural abstractionstructural forcesstructural formstructuresymmetrysynthesised relationship • teratology • vertebrae • Vitra • vocabulary of form • William Bateson

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
04 MAY 2012

Lucy McRae: body architect and synthetic biologist

"Lucy creates provocative and often grotesquely beautiful imagery that suggests a new breed existing in an alternate world.

Trained as a classical ballerina and architect her work inherently fascinates with the human body. The media call her inventor, friends call her a trailblazer. Either way, she relies on instinct to evolve an extraordinary visual path that is powerful, primal and uniquely Lucy McRae."

(Lucy McRae)

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absurd • alternate world • anatomyarchitecture • Bart Hess • beauty expressionbody • body architect • body morph • Champagne Valentine • classical ballerina • corporealcostume designfashionfashion body • future human • future human shapes • genetic manipulationgrotesquegrotesquely beautiful imageryhuman bodyhuman enhancement • human silhouette • ideal formintimate interfaces • invent and build • inventorlow-tech • Lucy McRae • LucyandBart • material world • new breed • performancephysical archetypeposthuman • primal • prostheticsprovocative • psychic-sexual • re-shape • scenario • shockingskinspeculative design • surrealist • synthetic biologist • transposing materialsvisceralvisual spectaclevisualisation

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
08 APRIL 2011

Jean-Luc Godard: figures posing in order to be admired

"Godard is right at home here, especially following his 80s fare like Passion and First Name: Carmen. In this decade more than ever before, Godard was preoccupied with the fusing of image and sound, in the vein of Renaissance art and music. This means that he's obsessed with the human form, male and female bodies. Historically, this creates something curiously hybrid. While classical opera may have to do with bodies, Godard's style is decidedly closer to that of pre–Classical painting, with uncovered figures posing still in order to be admired or, better, worshiped. Godard's use of male bodies juxtaposing the females here fits nicely into his standard approach to bodies along with everything else: exchange of commodities. The transaction doesn't take place in the segment; the problem is an imbalance of supply with demand, a Marxist cliché that Godard is only too glad to inject into a series of films supposedly just about art and love."

(Zach 'Andrews idea', 29/08/2010)

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1987 • Aria (1987) • Armide • art and love • body • bodybuilder • classical opera • commodityEuropean Renaissancefemale bodygender performance culturegymgymnasiumhomoeroticism • human form • ideal form • Jean-Baptiste Lully • Jean-Luc GodardjuxtapositionKarl Marx • male body • MarxismmasculinitynarcissismoperaovercodingParisphysiologyphysiqueposeposing • pre-classical • pre-classical painting • Prenom Carmen • sexualityspectaclestylisedtableautransactionvisual depiction • worship

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
07 JULY 2009

Pantalaine: Provisioners of America's Finest Plural Clothing

"I so want to believe that Pantalaine really has been 'Provisioners of America's Finest Plural Clothing' since 1950, but something tells me that they are just getting their jollies making fun of the unfortunately real Slankets and Snuggies out there. Having said that, I kind of like the idea of mutated accessories and clothing that encourages interaction with our fellow humans."
('GiggleSugar', Sugar Inc.)

[It appears that 'Pantalaine' is an invention of the US literary journal McSweeney's Quarterly Concern.]

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1950blanketclothingcouch dressfashionideal form • McSweeneys Quarterly Concern • mutant • Pantalaine • parodypersonal spacespectaclespeculative designtongue-in-cheek

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
09 MARCH 2009

Women or androids?

"Oh, Playboy, why do you want your 'readers' to lust after androids? That's the only explanation we can think of for the proportions of your lovely ladybots. We culled the stats for every centerfold from December 1953 (Marilyn Monroe) to January 2009 (Dasha Astafieva), then calculated each woman's body–mass index.

A clear trend emerged: While real American women have steadily eaten their way up the BMI slope – just like American men – Playmates have gone from a sylphlike 19.4 to an anime–ideal 17.6."

(Katharine Gammon, 19.02.09)

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19641986androidbeauty • belle curves • BMI • bodybody image • body-mass index • centerfold • cheesecakeclassical beautycultural norms • Dasha Astafieva • fashionfemale formfemininitygendergender politics • glamour model • glamour photography • glamour shotideal female bodyideal form • infoporn • ladybot • Laurie Carr • Marilyn Monroephysical archetypepin-upPlayboy (magazine) • playmate • pornographyproportions • Rosemarie Hillcrest • Wired (magazine)

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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