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Which clippings match 'Conservative Think Tank' keyword pg.1 of 1
06 JUNE 2019

Astroturfing: corporate interests disguised as spontaneous popular movements

"The term 'astroturfing' is a play on the term 'grassroots movement,' since the grass is fake. Astroturfing has been attempted by online businesses who present a product as being highly desired and sought out by a certain customer base via company-sponsored message board posts, blogs or articles when there is no evidence to support such an assertion."

(BigCommerce)

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TAGS

advocacy groups • astroturf kingpin • astroturfing • astroturfing (phenomenon) • authentic response • authenticitybaseless claimsbelieving lies to be true • block legislation • campaign advertisingcognitive dissonanceconservative ideologyconservative think tankcontradictory narratives • controversial practice • corporate behaviour • corporate bullying • corporate lobbyingcorporations • corrupt practices • credibility • deceitful practices • deceitfulnessdeceptiondeliberate intention to misleaddiscrediting expertsdishonestydrunk drivingemotive manipulation • Employment Policy Institute • fake • fake grass-roots • fake grassroots movements • fake news • fake personas • fake reviews • fallacious argumentsfalse claims • falsified testimony • food safetygrass rootsgrassroots movement • hidden funding • illusion and reality • illusion of a populist idea. • inference • John Oliver • Last Week Tonight • Last Week Tonight with John Oliver HBO • lobbying • lobbyist • marketing practicesmemesmetaphorical representation • minimum wage • misleading message • misleading practices • mistruths • non-profit front groups • outreach • oversimplification • paid sick leave • perception management • pretending to be unbiased • public advocacy groups • public interest • public outreach • public-interest groups • Richard Berman • Rick Berman • secondhand cigarette smoke • sockpuppets • spontaneous popular movements • testimonies • the illusion of authenticity • undercover marketingunethical behaviourwhat is really happening

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
06 JUNE 2017

Sowing Climate Doubt Among Schoolteachers Through Unscientific Propaganda

"The book [Why Scientists Disagree about Global Warming] is unscientific propaganda from authors with connections to the disinformation-machinery of the Heartland Institute. In a recent letter to his members, David L. Evans, executive director of the National Science Teachers Association, said that 'labeling propaganda as science does not make it so.' He called the institute’s mass mailing of the book an 'unprecedented attack' on science education.

Judging from the responses of educators I know who have received 'Why Scientists Disagree About Global Warming' in recent weeks, most copies of it are likely to be ignored or discarded. But if only a small percentage of teachers use it as intended, they could still mislead tens of thousands of students with it year after year."

(Curt Stager, 27 April 2017, The New York Times)

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TAGS

2015 • 2015 United Nations Climate Change Conference • Breitbart • climate changeclimate change casualty • climate change denialists • climate change propaganda • climate change scepticismclimate contrarians • climate crisis • climate experts • climate reconstructions • climate science skeptics • climate scientistsconservative think tank • creationism • creationist perspectives • dishonesty • Energy Makes America Great • explanation of phenomena • fake science • false assertions • false premise • fossil fuel emissions • global warming • human-driven climate change • ice cores • Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change • IPCC • Joseph Bast • lake sediments • Marita Noon • misrepresentationNew York Times • paleoclimatology • propagandaresponsibility • school teachers • science education • science educators • scientific consensus • scientific evidence • solar activity • The Heartland Institute • the role of human activity on climate change • tree ringsunnatural phenomenon • volcanism

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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